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Publication numberUS2964315 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 13, 1960
Filing dateNov 2, 1959
Priority dateNov 2, 1959
Publication numberUS 2964315 A, US 2964315A, US-A-2964315, US2964315 A, US2964315A
InventorsDinning Neil F
Original AssigneeDinning Neil F
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Ski-training device
US 2964315 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Dec. 13, 1960 N. F. DINNING SKITRAINING DEVICE 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed NOV. 2, 1.959

i c u/ United States Patent SKI-TRAININ G DEVICE Neil F. Dinning, 278 Howard Ave., Sherbrooke, Quebec, Canada Filed Nov. 2, 1959, Ser. No. 850,323 8 Claims. (Cl. 272-57) The present invention relates to improvements in skitechnique training devices and more particularly to an apparatus of this nature wherein a skier may perform the required movements under conditions simulating actual skiing conditions.

As is well known, downhill skiing at the present time is performed at high speeds requiring considerable skill and training for proper control. To maintain control at these speeds expert skiers have developed the technique generally known as parallel skiing.

There are various versions of this technique but in all cases the principle involved depends upon the controlled shifting of the centre of body weight towards the tips of the skis and so unweighting the back portions. This is accomplished by bending of the knees and forward inclination of the body. Simultaneously the torso is twisted and the desired turning effect is achieved. The braking effect occurs when the knees straighten and the body rises thus redistributing the weight back along the entire ski length.

As will be appreciated to achieve the desired result these movements can only be accomplished while moving at a comparatively high speed over slippery surfaces. To master this technique in actual skiing requires expert instruction and constant practice.

The present invention aims to provide an apparatus on which and in combination with the usual skis and boots the required movements can be practiced on any smooth firm surface indoors or outdoors without the necessity of any forward motion. Accordingly, a skier may thus master the ability, condition his body and familiarize himself to the feel and performance of his own equipment before exposing his body to the hazards of high speed skiing. V

More specifically, a preferred embodiment. of a ski training device in accordance with the invention com-. prises essentially a supporting platform havingnan upper surface provided with at least two spaced supporting portions adapted to receive and retain a pair of skis in side by side relationship and a boot locating portion disposed intermediate the ski supporting portions. The lower surface of the platform is provided with a main supporting point, disposed directly beneath the boot locating portion of the upper surface and a further adjustable point which is located in advance of the main supporting point. It should be mentioned that the skis are located on the platform" upper surface so that the ski boots are aligned with the boot locating portion in order that the weight of the person wearing the skis is normally located above the main supporting point of the lower surface and the device, when resting on a smooth level surface; makes contact with the surface on the main supporting point and the adjustable supporting point.

The adjustable supporting point is adjustable in the sense that it can be moved along the length of the platform lower surface in even graduations towards the 2,964,315 Patented Dec. 13, 1960 front of the device and away from the main supporting oint.

p Further, the lower surface of the platform is shaped so that in any position the bottom surface of the adjustable point is at a lesser vertical distance from a plane defined by the upper surfaces of the ski supporting portions than the bottom surface of the main supporting points. As the portion of the platform supporting the lower surface adjustable point tapers upwardly towards the platform upper surface this vertical distance diminishes as the adjustable point is moved out.

Since in a preferred construction the lower surface main supporting point consists of a pair of transversely spaced smooth surfaced bosses or gliders and the adjustable point consists of a centrally located similar glider, the device is normally supported on three spaced apart points with the weight of the skier centered over the main supporting point. By forward inclination of the body the weight is transferred through the skis to the platform so that the Weight is shifted from the main supporting point to the adjustable supporting point. This action raises the main supporting points from contact with the supporting surface or at least reduces their frictional contact with the surface so as to permit sliding movement. Accordingly by applying a twisting or rotary motion of the body as is required by the various techniques the platform can be pivoted in either direction about the adjustable point which now serves as an axis.

The gliding sliding motion thus achieved simulates closely the actual motions of parallel skiing as previously described.

Having thus generally described the nature of the invention particular reference will be made to the accom panying drawings and in which:

Figure 1 is a view in perspective elevation of a preferred construction of a ski training device in accordance with the invention.

Figure 2 is a cross sectional view of the constructionshown in Figure 1 along theline 22..

Figure 3 is a cross sectional view of the construction shown in Figure 1 along the line 3'--3.

Figure 4 is a diagrammatic view in side elevation of the device of the invention as it would appearwhentlie body of the skier 'is inclined forwardly shifting the major portion of the weight to the adjustable supporting point.

Figure 5' is a view in plan of the underside of the construction shown in Figure 1. t

Figure 6 is a longitudinal cross section of the construction shown in Figure 5 along the line 6--6.

With particular reference to Figures 1, 5 and 6 of the drawings 'a preferred construction of a ski training device in accordance with the invention is shown as come prising a unitary body or platform 10 moulded from a suitable plastic material for example, high impact styrene, or the like. It will be appreciated that other materials. could be utilized; for example the platform could be: fabricated from wood, aluminum or steel tubing, or the like.

The platform 10 is shaped as illustrated to provide a central beam 16 having spaced transverse extensions 12a, 12b, 12a. The portions of the extensions 12a, 12c extending above the beam 12 and forming the upper surface of the device are provided with recessed ski receiving surfaces 13a, while the portion of the extension 12b extending above the beam provides the ski boot locating portion 13b. The ski engaging surfaces 13a, 13c are in horizontal parallel aligned-relationship as shown. in'Figure 3 and each is provided with a suitable ski engaging surface, for example a layer of sponge rubber as indicated at 14. In'the-construction' shownitheiupper. surface of the portion 13b is substantially level "with the? ski supporting surfaces 13a, 13c and will be contacted by the skis to act as a further support. Alternatively the portion 13b can terminate below the surfaces 13a, 130 to permit longitudinal flexing of the skis if desired.

As shown in Figures 5 and 6 the interiors of the beam 16 and extensions 12a, 12b, 12c are provided with reinforcing webs indicated generally at 15 so as to provide the desired strength and rigidity to the moulded form without adding unnecessarily to the amount of material utilized and consequently to the weight of the device.

The end portions of the central extension 12b, protruding beyond each side of the beam 16 are also provided internally with a solid block 20 each having a central bore 21 adapted to receive the shank of a dome shaped glider 22 having a smooth polished bottom surface. With this arrangement, the main supporting point of the lower surface of the platform comprises the spaced apart gliders 22 extending beyond the lower surface of the extension 12b. From this point the lower surface of the platform extends upwards towards each end with the forward end, having the extension 12a, provided with a central web channel 25 containing a plurality of regularly spaced apart blocks 23 provided with central bores 24 each adapted to selectively receive the shank of a further glider 22a which thus provides a further and adjustable supporting point for the platform lower surface. With this arrangement, the glider 22a can be inser-ted in any desired one of the blocks 23 so that the relative spacing from the main supporting point can be varied as desired.

7 In all cases, as will be evident from the drawings, the vertical distance from the bottom surface of the glider 22a to the plane defined by the aligned surfaces 13a, 130 of the upper surface will be less than the corresponding vertical distance between the lower surface of the gliders 22 and the said plane so defined.

As the web-channel 25 tapers upwardly towards the front end of the platform this vertical distance between the top surface and the bottom of the glider 22a will be reduced in graduated steps as the glider is moved outwards along the blocks 23. It is by this arrangement ;hat the desired action is achieved as will be described ater.

As an example the following dimensions have been utilized in an experimental model and found satisfactoryoverall length of beam 16, about 36"; length from front of beam 16 to centre of gliders 22, about 24"; maximum height from level of ski supporting surfaces 13a, 13c to bottom of gliders 22,,about 4"; minimum height from ski supporting surface 13a to lower surface of corresponding end of web channel 25, about 3".

In use, the user attaches his boots and skis in the usual manner and stands on the device with his skis resting on the resilient layers 14 covering the surfaces 13a, 130. As is shown diagrammatically in Figure 1, the heels of the boots are placed over the boot locating portion 13b so that the weight of the body is evenly distributed through the device onto the three point suspension formed by the gliders 22 and 22a. In this position all three points are resting frictionally against the supporting surface and the skis cannot be rotated.

When the knees are bent and the body inclined forward the body weight becomes centered over the adjustable point 22:: and the points 22 leave the floor or other smooth supporting surface A as shown in Figure 4 if the technique practiced calls for a complete weight shift. In a technique where the weight shift is more gradual the weight distribution is such that at least sufficient weight is raised from the gliders 22 so that they can slide over the supporting surface. The body and skis can now be pivoted or rotated with the adjustable point 22a acting as a main pivotal axis. As the knees are straightened and the body rises, the weight again moves backwards and is evenly distributed between the points 4 22 and 22a. The points 22 again rest on the supporting surface and any rotational movement is checked.

Accordingly, the movement required in any of the accepted techniques of parallel skiing can thus be practiced. As will be obvious from the accompanying drawings and preceding description the further forward the point or glider 22a is placed the more effort is required to make the necessary movements. This of course can be further varied by moving the boots forward from the boot locating portion 13b. The varying snow conditions found in actual skiing can thus be duplicated.

I claim:

1. A ski training device comprising, a platform having an upper surface provided with a boot locating portion and at least two spaced apart ski supporting portions in substantially paralleled horizontal alignment adapted to engage and support a pair of skis with the boot retaining portions of said skis in alignment with said platform boot locating portion, a lower surface provided with a main supporting point adapted to rest on a fiat supporting surface and being disposed in substantial vertical alignment with the said upper surface boot lo cating portion, and a further adjustable point also adapted to rest on said fiat supporting surface and disposed in spaced relationship from and in advance of said main supporting point, the vertical distance bteween the bottom surface of said adjustable supporting point and the plane defined by said upper surface ski supporting portions being less than the vertical distance between the lower surface of said main supporting points and said upper surface plane, whereby distribution of the weight of a person on skis supported on said platform upper surface towards the end of said platform having said adjustable supporting point reduces the frictional contact of said main supporting point with said fiat supporting surface to at least a point permitting sliding pivotal movement of said platform about said lower surface adjustable supporting point.

2. A ski training device as claimed in claim 1, including means whereby said lower surface adjustable supporting point can be moved along said lower surface towards one end of said platform and away from said lower surface main supporting point in graduated steps, said platform lower surface tapering upwardly away from said main supporting point, whereby, said vertical distance between said adjustable point bottom surface and said upper surface plane is reduced accordingly.

3. A ski training device as claimed in claim 1, wherein said lower surface main and adjustable supporting points are provided with smooth substantially fiat friction reducing bottom surfaces adapted to contact said flat supporting surface.

4. A ski training device as claimed in claim 1, wherein said main supporting point comprises a pair of dome shaped gliders mounted on the lower surface of said platform in aligned spaced relationship transversely to the axis of said platform.

5. A ski training device comprising, a main beam having a plurality of spaced transverse extensions extending beyond the upper surface of said beam and beyond said beam at each side, at least two of said transverse extensions disposed at the front and rear of said beam respectively having upper ski supporting surfaces disposed in horizontal parallel alignment with a further one of said transverse extensions disposed between said ski supporting extensions and constituting a ski boot locating portion, a pair of contact members having friction reducing lower surfaces mounted in aligned spaced relationship on the lower surface of said boot locating transverse extensions and constituting main supporting points adapted to frictionally contact a smooth supporting surface, and a further contact member having a friction reducing lower surface mounted on the lower surface of said beam in spaced relationship from said main supporting point to constitute an adjustable supporting I point also adapted to frictionally contact said smooth supporting surface, the lower surface of said beam between said main supporting point and the forward one of said transverse beam extensions being so formed that the vertical distance between the bottom surface of said adjustable supporting point and a plane defined by the ski supporting surfaces of said front and rear transverse beam extensions is less than the vertical distance between the lower surfaces of said main supporting points and said plane, whereby distribution of the weight of a person on skis supported on said platform upper surface towards the front end of said beam reduces the frictional contact of said main supporting point with said smooth supporting surface to at least a point permitting sliding pivotal movement of said platform about said lower surface adjustable point.

6. A ski training device as claimed in claim 5, including means whereby said lower surface adjustable supporting point can be moved along said beam lower surface towards the front end of said beam in graduated steps, said beam lower surface tapering upwardly away from adjacent said main supporting point, whereby said vertical distance between said adjustable point bottom surface and said upper surface plane is reduced accordingly.

7. A ski training device as claimed in claim 5 wherein said lower surface main and adjustable contact members comprise dome shaped gliders having smooth lower surfaces.

8. A ski training device as claimed in claim 5, wherein said beam and transverse extensions are moulded from plastic material as a unitary body.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,274,081 Mautin Feb. 24, 1942 2,573,808 Ravoire Nov. 6, 1951 2,580,932 Lantry Jan. 1, 1952 2,657,055 Denham Oct. 27, 1953

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2274081 *Jun 5, 1941Feb 24, 1942Francois MautinSki exercising machine
US2573808 *Aug 12, 1948Nov 6, 1951George N MooreApparatus for teaching and practicing skiing
US2580932 *Aug 25, 1949Jan 1, 1952Norman D LantryExercising device
US2657055 *Feb 13, 1951Oct 27, 1953Denham James EarlSki practice board
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3207510 *Mar 27, 1963Sep 21, 1965Gibson Frederick MSki training device
US4101136 *Jan 17, 1977Jul 18, 1978Corll James AExercising apparatus
US4251068 *Jul 12, 1979Feb 17, 1981Tarnacki Edward JExercising device for skiers
US4678183 *Oct 4, 1985Jul 7, 1987Joseph SkovajsaDevice for ski training
US4708339 *Feb 27, 1987Nov 24, 1987Questek Corp.Pre-ski testing and exercising apparatus
US5078393 *Jul 28, 1989Jan 7, 1992Morasiewicz Kathleen GFoot exercising device
US5184989 *Nov 13, 1991Feb 9, 1993George StanecPhysical exercise system using skis
US5188578 *Jan 13, 1992Feb 23, 1993Voigt Bruce SFor attaching to a ski boot
US5904636 *Feb 17, 1998May 18, 1999Chen; PaulExerciser for surfing
US6666797 *Nov 13, 2000Dec 23, 2003Daniel William MartinApparatus for the simulation of snowboard use
US7686751Oct 22, 2007Mar 30, 2010Simbal Sports, LlcBoard sport training device and method of use
EP0153590A2 *Jan 25, 1985Sep 4, 1985James J. PerrinePre-ski testing and exercising apparatus
Classifications
U.S. Classification482/71, 482/146, 434/253, D21/771
International ClassificationA63B69/18
Cooperative ClassificationA63B69/18
European ClassificationA63B69/18