Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2965935 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateDec 27, 1960
Filing dateAug 11, 1958
Priority dateAug 11, 1958
Publication numberUS 2965935 A, US 2965935A, US-A-2965935, US2965935 A, US2965935A
InventorsAllen J Olsen
Original AssigneeRogers Ind Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Combination window
US 2965935 A
Abstract  available in
Images(4)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Dec. 27, 1960 Filed Aug. 11, 1958 A. J. OLSEN COMBINATION WINDOW 4 Sheets-Sheet 1 INVENTOR. Aug/J. 0Lsa/ BY Dec. 27, 1960 Filed Aug. 11, 1958 ls/wj A. J. OLSEN 2,965,935

COMBINATION WINDOW 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 IN V EN TOR. 4145/ J. 0L 3511 mww Dec. 27, 1960 A. J. OLSEN 2,965,935

COMBINATION WINDOW Filed Aug. 11, 1958 4 Sheets-Sheet 3 INVENTOR J. azse-l/ 4Troka/ I Dec. 27, 1960 A. J. OLSEN 7 2,965,935

COMBINATION WINDOW Filed Aug. 11. 1958 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 INVENTOR. lllib J, ozsen Zara/ United States Patent COMBINATION WIND OW Allen J. Olsen, Detroit, Mich., assignor to Rogers Industries, Inc., a corporation of Michigan- Filed Aug. 11, 1958, Ser. No. 754,470

Claims. (Cl. -52.2)

This invention relates to combination windows and more particularly to combination window assemblies and screens.

It is the object of the present invention to provide a novel form of window frame having a pair of tracks, one track adapted to slidably receive an upper window assembly and a lower framed screen. The other track adapted to slidably receive a vertical adjustable lower window assembly.

It is the object of the present invention to provide novel means for slidably and pivotally mounting the window assemblies within the window frame tracks for the purpose of minimizing friction and eliminating noise.

It is a further object to provide novel mounting for window assemblies whereby they may be slidably provisioned within the window frame and pivotally thereon and disengaged therefrom.

It is a further object to provide a novel window assembly including a series of interlocked channels together With a novel corner angle for fixedly securing the channels together defining the window or screen frame as a rigid unit.

It is a further object to provide a nylon cornerlock for the window and screen frames which include as a part thereof laterally and outwardly projecting pads which serve as cushions and which are adapted to slidably bear against portions of the window frame for minimizing friction and providing a quiet operation.

It is a further object to provide self locking frame corner angles.

It is another object to incorporate in the window frame corner angles laterally extending pivot means for retainingly engaging the upper ends of the window elements within the window frame tracks.

It is a further object to provide a novel latch mountable within the lower ends of the window assemblies on opposite sides to retain the lower ends of the window elements within their respective guide channels or tracks and which also lock said window assemblies closed or secure same in vertically adjusted positions.

It is another object herein to provide a novel form of window latch which is self securing within portions of the 'window assemblies but which may be easily disengaged and removed for repair or replacement.

These and other objects will be seen from the following specification and claims in conjunction with the appended drawings in which:

Fig. 1 is a front elevational view of an assembled Window frame with windows and screen as mounted within a building wall.

Fig. 2 is an interior elevational view of said assembled window frame on reduced scale illustrating the removability of the windows.

Fig. 3 is a section on an enlarged scale taken on line 3-3 of Fig. 1.

Fig. 4 is a fragmentary section taken on line 4-4 of Fig. 1. I

Fig. 5 is a fragmentary section taken on line 5-5 of Pi 1.

Fig. 6 is a fragmentary section taken on line 6-6 of Fi 1.

Fig. 7 is a fragmentary section on an enlarged scale taken on line 7-7 of Fig. 3.

Fig. 8 is a fragmentary section on an enlarged scale taken on line 8-8 of Fig. 3.

Fig. 9 is a plan view of the corner angle shown in Fig. 7.

Fig. 10 is an end elevational view thereof.

Fig. 11 is a side elevational view of the screen frame corner lock of Fig. 8, on an enlarged scale. I

Fig. 12 is a plan view thereof.

Fig. 13 is an end elevational view thereof.

Fig. 14 is a perspective view of one form of corner angle for the window frame assembly shown in Fig. 8.

Fig. 15 is a plan view of the window latch shown in Fig. 8.

Fig. 16 is a side elevational view thereof.

Fig. 17 is a left end elevational view of Fig. 16.

Fig. 18 is a right end elevational view thereof.

Fig. 19 is a section on an enlarged scale taken on line 19-19 of Fig. 16.

Fig. 20 is a fragmentary section on an enlarged scale taken on line 20-20 of Fig. 15.

It will be understood that the above drawings illustrate merely a preferred embodiment of the invention and that other embodiments are contemplated within the scope of the claims hereafter set forth. Referring to the drawings, Fig. 1 indicates fragmentarily at 11 a portion of a building wall having a rectangular opening 12 within which is' nested and secured a window frame 13. Said frame has an irregular cross sectional shape as shown in Fig. 4 and is so constructed as by extruding, for example, to provide a pair of parallel spaced guideways or tracks for receiving respectively the vertically adjustable window assemblies 17 and 29.

Frame 13 includes the front upright flanges 14 which define a pair of end rails and which is also formed into the top and bottom rails 15 suitably chamfered at their ends and secured together on a conventional manner.

The front flange 14-15 adapted to be positioned flush with the interior wall of a building has an inner edge which defines the upright rectangular opening 16 within which is loosely projected the lower vertically adjustable tilt window 17, Fig. 5. Said window along its rear surface bears against the upright retainer 18, and slidably engages the same upon vertical adjustment, there being a suitable resilient seal 92 mounted on window 17 engageable with retainer 18.

The flange 14 in conjunction with retainer 18 has upon its interior the upright channel 19 further defined by the extrusions 31-32 which form an integral part of the win-' dow frame assembly 13.

Fig. 4 fragmentarily illustrates the location of the rear wardly arranged vertically adjustable framed window 29 which is slidably positioned within the rectangular opening defined by the continuous rearwardly extending flange 33 adjacent retainer 18. Said window slidably engages the inwardly directed flange 27 with a suitable seal 92 carried upon the rear surface of the frame of window 29 engageable with the inner surface of continuous flange 27.

Window frame 13 also includes the additional continuous extrusion 34 which defines with extrusion 32 and flange 27 the second upright channel 28 into which is slidably positioned the laterally extending pivots 20 projecting laterally from the upper end of window 29 on its opposite sides as further shown in Fig. 1. Said pivots are retainingly engaged by the inwardly directed flange 33 which forms a part of Window frame 13. Window assembly 29 is otherwise loosely positioned within the opening defined by flange 33. Similar pivots 20 projecting laterally from opposite sides of the top of window 17 are retainingly engaged by flange 14 adjacent opening 16.

A pair of laterally directed spring biased latches 21 project from the lower ends of both of the window assemblies 17 and 29 with the latches on window assembly 29 nested within channel 28 and with the corresponding latches for window 17 nested within channel 19, Fig. 6. Accordingly in both cases the vertically adjustable windows are loosely positioned within the respective window openings and are retained at their upper ends by the gilvots 20 and at their lower ends by the retractable latches As shown in Figs. 1 and 6, within the upright channels 19 and projecting rearwardly of flanges 14 is the upright latch plate 23 which is continuous throughout the window frame and has formed therethrough a pair of opposed transverse notches 22, adapted to cooperatively and retainingly receive latches 21 for securing window 17 in its lowermost position.

Said latches 21 restrain lower window 17 against upward movement within its track. However, window 17 may be elevated by manual application to the said latches as at points 80 by which the sliding latches are withdrawn from the respective slots 22. Upon upward movement of window 17, the respective latches 21 will ride along the interior surfaces of latch plates 23 and will be resiliently projected within the next adjacent opposed recesses 24 in said latch plates upon registry therewith to thereby support window 17 in an intermediate position against downward movement.

Slots 24 terminate in the curved cam surfaces 25 whereby an upward thrust upon window 17 will automatically retract the respective latches against their spring biased supports.

Further elevation of the window 17 may be accomplished until latches 21 resiliently project within the opposed top pair of notches 24 formed in latch plates 23. In order to drop the window down, it is necessary to again manually retract the latches inwardly against the action of their springs. It is further necessary to hold these latches inwardly until passing of the lower of the slots 24. Further downward movement of window 17 will'result in a snap closing and locking of the window with the latches 21 automatically projecting into latch openings 22 at the bottom of the window frame.

A similar construction is also provided for similar latches 21 arranged at the lower ends of the upper window 29 and wit-h respect to the second track or channel 28, as best illustrated in Fig. 5.

Here corresponding latches 21 normally bear against upright latch plates 23' which project rearwardly from extrusions 32. These plates also have a series of horizontally opposed pairs of notches adapted to retainingly receive latches 21 by which the upper window 29 is secured in its upper closed position or may be in an intermediate lowered position.

A similar camming structure is provided as shown at 24 and 25, Fig. l, by which window 29 may be elevated from any intermediate secured position without manual withdrawing of the respective latches.

Arranged below window 29 in a conventional manner and with respect to channel 28 is a screen 30 with a suitable frame 82 at its upper end interlocked with window 29 as shown in Fig. 3, with the lower end of said screen interlocked with the bottom sill 33.

The above described adjustable window assembly 29 includes the extruded preferably aluminum frame elements 35 which are mitered at 36 and include, as shown in Fig. 3, back flange 37 and the inwardly directed spaced extrusions 38 which define channel 39 adapted to snugly and cooperatively receive the respective legs 40 of the corner angles 43, shown on an enlarged scale in Fig. 7.

The respective frame elements 35-37 are in the form of extruded aluminum strips of the cross sectional shape movement of the respective windows.

shown in Fig. 3. These are assembled as shown and the respective corner angles 43 constructed of nylon are employed for fixedly securing the window frame elements together as a unit. The respective grooves 39 are of such size as to snugly and frictionally receive corner angles 40-43.

Legs 40 throughout portions of their length have a series of transverse inwardly directed serrations 41 which extend rearwardly or upwardly therearound and are adapted to grippingly engage frame elements 3537 and are thereby restrained against dislodgement.

The interlock is particularly illustrated at 42 in Fig. 7. The central body 43 of the corner angle terminates in the outer projection 44 which extends through corresponding notches formed in the outer surface of channel members 3537 and terminates in the upright pressure pad 45. This pressure pad extends laterally of the respective opposite sides of the window assembly and is adapted for loose contact with the inner surface of flange 33, Fig. 4, which defines corresponding window opening 26. The positioning of said pressure pads 45 on opposite sides of window 29 is shown in Fig. 1.

Being constructed of nylon, preferably, or of some other plastic, or low friction material, there is provided a sliding contact or pillow as at 45 between the upper ends of the window 29 and the adjacent frame portions by which vertical adjustments of the window are defined. A similar assembly is also provided at 20-45 within the opposing upper ends of lower window 17 and wherein the respective pillows 45 terminate in the laterally extending pivots 20. Shown in Fig. 5, these pivots are retainingly projected within channel 19 and against the inner surface of the respective continuous flange 14-46, inwardly of latch plates 23.

This construction permits a pivotal mounting loosely of the upper ends of windows 17 and 29 within their respective guide channels upon release of their respective lower latches 21. Said windows may be completely removed from the window flange, as illustrated in Fig. 2.

As shown in Figs. 3 and 7, the cooperating slotted channel frames for windows 17 and 29 include inner flange 46 which terminates in the inwardly directed continuous boss 47 to define with the flange 37 the continuous chamber 38 adapted to retainingly receive one margin of flexible sealing bead 49.

The opposite margin of said bead cooperatively engages peripheral portions of glass 50 which is nested within lateral offset 51 of the window frame and suitably secured thereto as by cementing.

The bottom frame for said windows includes extension 52 and web 53 defining with opposed flanges 38 the elongated grooves 54 similar to grooves 39 adapted to snugly and cooperatively receive end portions 55, Fig. 8, of corner angles 56 similar to top corner angles 43 of Fig. 7.

The respective channel frames have cooperating mitered corners as indicated at 36 in Fig. 1, and the corner angles 43 and 56 are adapted for fixedly securing the respective frame elements 35 in assembled relation.

Corner angle 56 has formed around intermediate end portions a series of rearwardly and outwardly inclined serrations 57 adapted to frictionally and retainingly engage within the corresponding right angularly related grooves 54.

Here also corner angles 56 at the lower ends of the windows extend through slotted end portions of adjacent frame elements and terminate in the upright pressure pads 58 similar to pressure pads 45 adapted for loose sliding engagement with the corresponding window guide flanges 33 and 16, as shown in Figs. 4 and 5.

Pads 58 are integral with the corner angles and are constructed of a non-metallic material such as nylon for minimizing friction and noise and to facilitate sliding The above described pressure pads 45 and 58 are arranged upon the exterior of opposite sides of said windows adjacent their tops and bottoms.

The respective bottom channel frames for said windows include the elongated flanges 59 which define with webs 53 and 61 the elongated outwardly opening slots 81 which extend across the width of the respective bottom channel frame. a

A pair of vertically aligned inwardly directed flanges 60 extend from Webs 53 and 61 serving as retaining guides for the manually retractable latch assemblies 66 arranged within and adjacent the outer ends of slot 81.

The bottom plates 59 terminate in the elongated downwardly depending flanges 62 which cooperate with the forwardly spaced vertical extensions 63 at the inner end of web 61 to define therewith an elongated recess adapted to retainingly receive the upper edge of the screen frame 83. Said screen frame is nested in the outer channel of window frame 13 and bears against retainers 27.

Flange 63 terminates in the upwardly curved and inwardly directed interlock 64 adapted to project under a corresponding downwardly extending laterally elongated interlock 94 projecting outwardly from the top channel frame of lower window 17 providing a seal therebetween. The lower channel screen frame is retained within bottom guide flange 33, Fig. 3, and includes support boss 93 which rests upon said flange. With screen 30 removed, window 29 may be vertically adjusted.

Referring to Fig. 7, the upper pressure pads 45 terminate in the inwardly directed flanges 65 which overlie the upper corners of the windows, said flanges 65 merging into the above described nylon pivots 20.

Latch assembly The above described latch is shown in detail in Figs. 15 through 20 and is generally indicated at 66 as a unitary molded device formed of a non-metallic substance, such as nylon, due to the strength, low friction, and wear characteristics thereof.

The latch includes the pair of spaced upwardly directed flanges 67 and the parallel spaced downwardly directed flanges 68, there being an intermediate longitudinally disposed connecting web 69 defining therebelow an elongated slot 70 adapted to receive coiled spring 78, Fig. 8.

The respective inner flanges 67 and 68 as shown in Figs. 3 and 8 interlockingly engage the opposed aligned flanges 60 upon the interior of the outwardly opening slot 81 which slidably receives latch assemblies 66 and limiting said assemblies to transverse sliding movements.

Latch assembly 66 has the outwardly projecting latch 21 at its outer end cooperatively engageable with the interior surfaces of guide flanges 33 and 16, Figs. and 6. Said latches 21 are adapted to slidably engage latch plates 23 and 23' and to be loosely projected within the respective transverse slots 22 and 24 above described in connection with Fig. I.

Said latch assemblies therefore perform the function of serving as projection means at the lower ends of the respective windows retainingly engaged within the inner and outer channels of the main window frame and bearing against the interior surfaces of the respective guide flanges 16 and 33.

The latch element 21 serves the further function of fixedly, yet adjustably securing the respective windows in closed position or in intermediate positions within their respective channels.

Each latch assembly 66 has one end wall engaged by spring 78, Fig. 8. The other end wall defining said slot is tapered at 71 to cooperatively engage cam surface 74 of dog 73 positioned within slot 70.

The inner end of said dog has a circular boss '77 adapted to retainingly engage within one end of spring 78. The opposite end of said dog has a lateral boss 75 which extends outwardly and movably through opening 76 formed in web 61 defining the bottom wall of slot 81.

Upon assembly, web 61 cooperates with the latch assembly for effectively retaining securing spring 78 within slot 70 and likewise supports dog 73 therein.

As shown in Figs. -16, latch assembly 66 has towards its rear end the outwardly opening slot 79 defined by the spaced end walls 80 which provide a finger piece or means to permit manual withdrawal of the latch as sembly for disengaging latch 21 from a particular latch plate opening, such as opening 22 in Fig. 1. This permits vertical adjustment of the window. Access to slot 79, as shown in Fig. 8, is through the outwardly opening slot 81 in the bottom channel frame for the window.

Boss 75 on dog 73 serves to anchor spring 78 within a latch assembly 66 and furthermore said boss restrains said latch assembly against outward withdrawal-from the end of slot 81. Should it be desired to replace the latch assembly, this may be done by simply projecting boss 75 inwardly so as to clear opening 76 against the action of spring 78. The entire assembly may then be laterally withdrawn from the end of slot 81 for repair or replacement. Upon re-assembly, the action of spring 78 and the cam action of inclined surface 71 with respect to cam surface 74, causes boss 75 to resiliently project through opening 76 as the latch assembly is reassembled within slot 81. This is a great improvement over prior constructions because the removal of the latch assembly may be accomplished without in any manner disassembling the window frame.

Referring to Figs. 3 and 8, the screen assembly includes the cooperating mitered end channel frame elements 82 with spaced outwardly directed flanges 83 there-around defining a continuous outwardly opening slot 88.

Corner angles 84 of non-metallic material such as nylon are snugly and tightly projected within the outwardly opening slots of said screen channel frame for fixedly securing the frame elements together. The interior wall of flange 83 towards its outer edge is laterally offset as at 83 to retainingly receive the lateral offset 84, Figs. 11, 12 and 13.

The outer ends of the corner angles are tapered at 85 to facilitate insertion within the slots defined in the frame channels 83. A series of outwardly and rearwardly directed serrations 86 extend transversely across the bottom or inner walls of angle members 84. An additional set of right angularly related serrations 88 extend transversely across the outer walls of lateral extension 84. These serrations operatively and retainin-gly engage interior surface portions of the screen channel frames 83 whereby the screen frame assembly is fixedly secured together.

The corner angles 84 extend to outer margins of the intersecting channels 83. There is provided at the outer edge on one side of said corner angle the right angularly related pressure pad 87. This pad of nylon material projects laterally from opposite sides of the framed screen at its top and bottom and is adapted for loose sliding contact with the interior surface of guide flange 33 of the outer channel 28 in the window frame 13.

The screen 38 at its margins is projected within the outwardly opening continuous groove 90 formed upon the exterior of the assembled screen frame 83 and is secured therein by the continuous wire head 89 in a conventional manner.

The bottom channel frame for said screen, as shown in Fig. 3, includes the transverse outwardly extending flange 91 to facilitate raising of the screen from the position shown in Fig. 3 and removal thereof. Upon assembly within window frame 13, of outer window 29 with respect to channel 28, the screen is then inserted with its upper edge retainingly projected between the depending flanges 62-63 which form a part of the lower channel frame of window 29.

The lower edge of the bottom flange of the screen frame is projected behind guide flange 33 which functions like a sill and retains the screen against outward 7. movement once assembled. Inwardly extending boss 93 cooperates with the top surface of flange 33 for supporting said screen in the position shown.

Thereafter the outer window 17 is assembled with respect to window frame 13 by first canting the window as shown in Figs. 2 and 5 so that the pivots 20 at its upper end interlock Within channel 19 behind guide flanges 16.

As a final step, the two latches 21 at opposite lower ends of window 17 are manually retracted simultaneously and the window frame is projected at its lower end into channel 19. The latches 21 when released assume the window retaining position shown in Fig. 6, completing the combination window assembly of Fig. 1.

The corner angles 43, 56 and 84 and associated pivots and pressure pads may be constructed of a suitable low friction metal or other material. The dotted line indication of dog 73 in Figs. 15 and 16 is not a position of use. It is molded thatway and broken off.

Having described my invention, reference should now be had to the following claims.

I claim:

1. In a window structure, a sash including a channel frame having an outwardly opening groove extending throughout the width of said sash, spring biased manually retractable non-metallic latches slidably and retainingly positioned within opposite ends of said groove, each latch having an elongated slot therein, a dog within and retainingly engaging the latch at one end of said slot and including a boss movably projected outwardly of said slot through an opening in said channel frame, and a coiled spring under compression in said slot interposed between said dog and latch at the other end of the slot, said dog serving to anchor said spring, the spring resisting manual inward withdrawal of said latch, said dog securing said latch against longitudinal outward movement from its normal latching position.

2. The window structure of claim 1, said boss being manually projectable inwardly against the action of the spring for disengagement from the opening in said channel frame, permitting longitudinal outward removal of said latch from said channel groove.

3. A hollow rectangular frame defining an upright channel, a sash mounted therein, said sash including a channel frame having an outwardly opening groove extending throughout the width of said sash, spring biased manually retractable non-metallic latches slidably and retainingly positioned within opposite ends of said groove, an upright transversely apertured latch plate within said channel and cooperable with said latches, each latch having an elongated slot in its undersurface, a dog within.

and retainingly engaging the latch at one end of said slot, and including a boss movably projected outwardly of said slot and through an opening in said channel frame, and a coiled spring under compression in said slot interposed between said dog and the latch at the other end of the slot, said dog serving to anchor said spring, the spring resisting manual inward withdrawal of said latch, a wall portion of said channel frame cooperating with said slot for retaining the spring and dog therein, said dog securing said latch against longitudinal outward movement from its normal latching position.

4. The sash structure of claim 3, said boss being manually projectable inwardly against the action of said spring for disengagement from said channel frame permitting longitudinal removal of said latch from said channel groove.

5. In a window structure, a sash including a channel frame having an outwardly opening groove therein, a spring biased manually retractable non-metallic latch slidably and retainingly positioned within said groove, said latch having an elongated slot therein, a dog within and retainingly engaging the latch at one end of said slot and including a boss movably projected outwardly of said slot through an opening in said channel frame, and a coiled spring under compression in said slot interposed between said dog and latch at the other end of the slot, said dog serving to anchor said spring, the spring resisting manual inward withdrawal of said latch, said dog securing said latch against longitudinal outward movement from its normal latching position.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,101,349 Sharp Dec. 7, 1937 2,639,769 Krantz May 26, 1953 2,730,776 Flicker Jan. 17, 1956 2,775,797 Rosen Ian. 1, 1957 2,781,112 Fischer Feb. 12, 1957 2,804,181 Haynes Aug. 27, 1957 2,804,952 Nothdurft Sept. 3, 1957 2,818,610 Pengelly Jan. 7, 1958 2,861,659 Hagerty et al Nov. 25, 1958

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2101349 *Apr 7, 1934Dec 7, 1937Commw Trust CompanyJoining lengths of metal
US2639769 *Mar 10, 1947May 26, 1953Walter M KrantzScreen insert for storm windows
US2730776 *Apr 14, 1953Jan 17, 1956Jasco Aluminum Products CorpWindow sash mounting and locking arrangement
US2775797 *Jan 31, 1955Jan 1, 1957Rosen HerbertLocking mechanism
US2781112 *Jul 19, 1955Feb 12, 1957Challenger Products IncWindow sashes
US2804181 *Apr 6, 1954Aug 27, 1957Joseph E HaynesSliding sash with lubricated bearings
US2804952 *Mar 9, 1955Sep 3, 1957Nothdurft Karl FWindow frame corner clip
US2818610 *Jul 15, 1954Jan 7, 1958Air Master CorpStorm windows
US2861659 *Dec 10, 1956Nov 25, 1958Adlake CoCorner joint
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3083419 *Dec 9, 1960Apr 2, 1963Richard E PenningtonCombination window sash lock and lift
US3099050 *Feb 24, 1960Jul 30, 1963Vac Inc DeWindow sash construction
US3121922 *Sep 15, 1961Feb 25, 1964Zephyr Aluminum CompanyWindow with removable sashes
US3129470 *Nov 14, 1960Apr 21, 1964Seasonmaster IncWindow sash latch construction
US3133324 *Jun 13, 1961May 19, 1964Philip ForemanMagnetic weather seal and window control
US3167822 *Aug 30, 1963Feb 2, 1965Season All Ind IncDouble hung window
US3219100 *May 15, 1961Nov 23, 1965Security Aluminum CompanyStorm window
US3253847 *Dec 12, 1961May 31, 1966Reynolds Metals CoFrame constructions and parts and methods for making the same or the like
US3290825 *Jun 4, 1964Dec 13, 1966Frank E AdamsDouble-hung balanced take-out window
US3342514 *Mar 31, 1965Sep 19, 1967Win Chek Ind IncFrame corner structure
US3369326 *Dec 9, 1964Feb 20, 1968Kaufmann Window And Door CorpWindow construction
US4024690 *Feb 25, 1976May 24, 1977Replacement Products Industries CorporationWindow sash and frame with thermal barrier
US4037378 *Feb 24, 1976Jul 26, 1977Replacement Products Industries CorporationWindow frame
US4087941 *Mar 4, 1977May 9, 1978Coleman Mfg. Co.Window assembly
US4344255 *Aug 18, 1980Aug 17, 1982Quaker Window Products Co.Window sash
US4498567 *Sep 30, 1982Feb 12, 1985R. A. Jones & Co., Inc.Perimeter guard for a machine
US4833848 *May 28, 1987May 30, 1989Georges GuerinDouble panel assembly
US5551189 *Jun 23, 1994Sep 3, 1996Caldwell Manufacturing CompanyIn a tilt window
US5671958 *Jun 28, 1996Sep 30, 1997Szapucki; Matthew PeterSnap on latch mechanism for a sash window
US6155615 *Jul 22, 1998Dec 5, 2000Ashland Products, Inc.Tilt-latch for a sash window
US6183024May 7, 1999Feb 6, 2001Ashland Products, Inc.Tilt-latch for a sash window
US6230443May 5, 1999May 15, 2001Ashland Products, Inc.Hardware mounting
US6485070Oct 26, 2000Nov 26, 2002Ashland Products, Inc.Tilt-latch for a sash window
US6722712Mar 11, 2002Apr 20, 2004Ashland Products, Inc.Tilt-latch for a sash window
US6832792Aug 14, 2002Dec 21, 2004Newell Operating CompanyActuator for a tilt-latch for a sash window
US6874826Nov 14, 2000Apr 5, 2005Ashland Products, Inc.Actuator for a tilt-latch for a sash window
US6948278Dec 4, 2000Sep 27, 2005Ashland Products, Inc.Adjustable tilt-latch for a sash window
US7171784Apr 10, 2003Feb 6, 2007Newell Operating CompanyTilt-latch for a sash window
US7222458Mar 14, 2005May 29, 2007Newell Operating CompanyActuator for a tilt-latch for a sash window
US7431355Jun 23, 2006Oct 7, 2008Newell Operating CompanyTilt-latch for a sash window
US8850759 *Mar 4, 2013Oct 7, 2014Sven DietherWindow
US20130232894 *Mar 4, 2013Sep 12, 2013Sven DietherWindow
USRE37916Sep 29, 1999Dec 3, 2002Ashland Products, Inc.Snap on latch mechanism for a sash window
DE1434974B1 *Jul 29, 1963Apr 30, 1970Devac IncLotrecht bewegbares Schiebefenster od.dgl.
Classifications
U.S. Classification49/450, 403/295, 292/175, 52/204.5, 160/381
International ClassificationE06B3/44, E06B3/964
Cooperative ClassificationE06B2003/4492, E06B3/9648, E06B3/44, E06B2003/4453
European ClassificationE06B3/44, E06B3/964K2