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Publication numberUS2966694 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 3, 1961
Filing dateNov 15, 1954
Priority dateNov 15, 1954
Publication numberUS 2966694 A, US 2966694A, US-A-2966694, US2966694 A, US2966694A
InventorsJr Charles L Brown
Original AssigneeElectrolux Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Double purpose suction cleaning nozzle
US 2966694 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jan. 3, 1961 c. L. BROWN, JR 2,966,694 DOUBLE PURPOSE SUCTION CLEANING NOZZLE Filed Nov. 15, 1954 I El!- 22 T a 40, 361

( INVENTOR ATTORNEY Unite i DOUBLE PURPOSE SUCTION CLEANING NOZZLE Filed Nov. 15, 1954, Ser. No. 468,691

6 Claims. (Cl. 15-417) My invention relates to cleaning implements for vacuum cleaners and more particularly to a double purpose tool, that is, one provided with two different types of suction nozzles which may be used selectively in order to clean different kinds of surfaces.

More particularly, my invention relates to the com bination of a brush nozzle for use in cleaning hard surfaces, and a nozzle for cleaning soft surfaces. It is highly desirable that such a tool have an overall height as small as possible in order that it may be inserted in narrow spaces. It has long been known to provide a tool of this nature with a swivel mounting on a suction conduit so that the tool merely may be turned over when it is desired to change from one type of nozzle to the other, the tool and the suction conduit comprising a rotary valve arranged so that turning of the former with respect to the latter serves to connect the proper suction nozzle to the conduit, as is shown in Patent No. 1,849,- 515 issued July 16, 1930 to Lars Ell. However, in order that the suction conduit may have the necessary cross-sectional area to accommodate the desired air flow, the diameter of this conduit must be such as to require an overall height of the tool which is greater than desirable, particularly when one of the tools is a brush nozzle which itself must have a greater vertical dimension than a nozzle for cleaning soft surfaces because of the length of the brush bristles.

In accordance with my invention a substantial reduction in the height of the combined tool is obtained without reducing the cross-sectional area of the suction conduit by making the latter fiat or oblong with its minor axis extending in a direction substantially normal to the two nozzle structures. This obviously prevents the tool from being rotatably mounted on the suction conduit, and in order to change from one type of nozzle to the other the tool is removed from the conduit, turned over and again connected to the conduit.

However, this nonrotatability is in itself an advantage, as in a tool embodying a rotary valve of the above type, turning of the suction conduit within the body of the tool when it is not desired to change from one nozzle to the other, as frequently takes place during manipulation of the tool during cleaning, nevertheless shifts the connections established by the valve so as to interfere with the proper flow of air into the suction nozzle being used. By making the suction conduit nonrotatable in the body of the tool, this undesired shifting of the valve is positively prevented.

Further objects and advantages of my invention will be apparent from the following description when considered in connection with the accompanying drawings, which form a part of this specification and of which;

Fig. l is a cross-sectional view taken on the line 1-1 of Fig. 2 and shows the nozzle for cleaning soft surfaces in operative position;

Fig. 2 is a bottom view of the nozzle shown in Fig. 1;

Fig. 3 is a cross-sectional view taken on the line 33 of Fig. 1;

States Patent Fig. 4 is a cross-sectional view similar to Fig. 3, but with one of the parts in a different position; and

Fig. 5 is a cross-sectional view similar to Fig. 3, but with the tool reversed so that the brush nozzle is in operative position.

Referring to the drawings, reference character 10 designates the body of a suction tool comprising parts 12 and 14 secured together by suitable screws 16. Part 12 includes the structure of a suction nozzle intended for cleaning soft surfaces, such as rugs or upholstered furniture. As is shown more particularly in Fig. 2, this part 12 is formed with a plurality of channels 18 in the outer face thereof, which channels lead to an opening 2!) extending through the part.

The other part 14 includes the structure forming the brush nozzle. This includes bristles 22 which are retained in a metal backing strip 24 which in turn is received within a recess formed in the outer surface of the part 14. A plate 26 is secured to the part 14 by screw 28 and serves to clamp the strip 24 in place. An opening 30 is formed through plate 26 and through part 14.

The mating surfaces of parts 12 and 14 are formed so as to provide a passageway 32 which extends into the body of the tool 10 from one of the side edges thereof and between the faces of the tool which carry the two different nozzle structures. As will be seen Particularly from Fig. 1, this passageway 32 is rectangular or oblong in cross-section with its minor axis extending normal to the sides of the tool on which are formed the suction nozzles. The inner end of this passageway is closed by means of a wall 34 formed by the two parts 12 and 14.

A hollow member constituting a suction conduit 36 is formed with a portion 38 having a rectangular or oblong shape corresponding to that of the passageway 32. The other portion of the conduit 36 is formed as a cylinder 40 with a slightly tapered bore 42 which is adapted to frictionally engage the tapered end of the suction hose or pipe.

The end of rectangular portion 38 is open and one of the wider walls is formed with a port 44. The two narrower walls of the portion 38 are formed with recesses 46 and a spring pressed detent 48 is so located in the tool 10 adjacent to one side of the passageway 32 as to engage one of the recesses 46 when the conduit 36 is fully inserted, in which position the open end of portion 38 of the conduit is closed by wall 34.

With the parts in the position shown in Figs. 1 and 3 it will be seen that the port 44 in the hollow member 36 is in alignment with the opening 20 leading from the passageway 32 to the nozzle structure in the part 12, whereas the opening 30 between the passageway 32 and the brush nozzle structure is closed by a wall of the hollow member. Consequently, if suction is applied to the hollow member through a suction hose or pipe, air will be caused to flow inwardly through the opening 20 and the aligned port 44 to the interior of the hollow member. If the nozzle is placed on a surface to be cleaned, air consequently will be drawn through the channels 18 to the opening 20 and will pick up and carry along dust and dirt from the surface.

If it is desired to use the brush nozzle the tool is removed from the suction conduit by withdrawing the latter from the passageway 32, the spring pressed detent 48 yielding to permit this. The tool is then turned over and the hollow member is again inserted in the passageway 32, whereby the position of the parts will be that shown in Fig. 5, wherein the port 44 is aligned with the opening 30 to the brush nozzle, while the opening 20 is closed. In this position, the detent engages the other recess 46.

If it is desired to reduce somewhat the suction applied to either of the nozzles, the hollow member may be moved outwardly in the passageway 32 so as to permit air to enter the hollow member through both the openings 2t and 3%, as is shown in Fig. 4. The nozzle structure on the part 12 is here shown as being in position for use, but due to the fact that the hollow member is withdrawn somewhat, air may also enter through the opening 30 from the brush nozzle, thus cutting down the suction applied to the opening 2%). If desired, the hollow member may be formed with additional recesses 51 so located that when engaged by the detent 48 the inner open end of the rectangular portion 38 is spaced a slight distance from the wall 34 which normally serves to close the inner end of the passageway 32.

If the portion 38 of the hollow member were not flattened but were cylindrical, it would necessarily have a diameter substantially greater than its present minor dimension in order to provide the same cross-sectional area, and hence the overall height of the tool would be correspondingly greater. (Ionsequently, in accordance with my invention the vertical height of a duplex suction tool may be substantially less than would be the case if the suction conduit were cylindrical where it extends within the tool.

While I have shown and described a more or less specific embodiment of my invention, it is to be understood that this has been done for the purpose of illustration only and that the scope of my invention is not to be limited thereby, but is to be determined from the appended claims.

What I claim is:

1. In a vacuum cleaner tool, a nozzle body formed with dissimilar surface contacting structures on opposite sides thereof, said body being formed with noncircular passageway means extending thereinto between said sides and communicating with said structures, and a hollow member having a noncircular exterior shape corresponding to that of said passageway means and insertable thereinto in different positions to establish communication selectively with the respective structures, said passageway and said hollow member being transversely elongated corresponding to the width and being transversely constricted corresponding to the thickness of the tool to afford substantially unobstructed airflow through said tool, the opening through one of said surface contacting structures being in tangential communication with a plurality of radial channels in the outer face of said structure whereby a spiral movement is imparted to the dust laden air as it enters said opening.

2. In a vacuum cleaner tool, a nozzle body having dissimilar surface contacting structures on opposite sides thereof, said body being formed with a noncircular passageway extending thereinto between said sides and with openings between the respective surface contacting structures and opposite sides of said passageway, and a hollow member formed with a port in one side and insertable in either of two positions in said passageway so as to cause said port to register with one or the other of said openings, said passageway and said hollow mem her being transversely elongated corresponding to the width and being transversely constricted corresponding to the thickness of the tool to afford substantially unobstructed airflow through said tool, the opening through one of said surface contacting structures being in tangential communication with a plurality of radial channels in the outer face of said structures whereby a spiral movement is imparted to the dust laden air as it enters said port.

3. In a vacuum cleaner tool, a nozzle body having dissimilar surface contacting structures on opposite sides thereof, said body being formed with a noncircular passageway extending thereinto between said sides with the minor dimension of said passageway disposed substantially at right angles to said sides, said body having openings between the respective surface contacting structures and opposite sides of said passageway, and a hollow member formed with a port'in one side and insertable selectively in either of two positions in said passageway so as to cause said port to register with one or the other of said openings, said passageway and said hollow member being transversely elongated corresponding to the width and being transversely constricted corresponding to the thickness of the tool to afford substantially unobstructed airflow through said tool, the opening through one of said surface contacting structures being in tangential communication with a plurality of radial channels in the outer face of said structures whereby a spiral movement is imparted to the dust laden air as it enters said port' 4. In a vacuum cleaner tool, a nozzle body having dissimilar surface contacting structures on opposite sides thereof, said body being formed with a noncircular passageway extending thereinto between said sides and having a closed inner end, said body having openings between the respective surface contacting structures and opposite sides of said passageway, a noncircular hollow member formed with a port in one side and insertable in either of two positions in said passageway so as to cause said port to register with one or the other of said openings, said member having an open inner end which is closed by the inner end of said passageway when the member is fully inserted in the passageway, said members being partially retractable in said passageway to space said open inner end from said closed inner end to provide communication between both of said openings and the interior of said hollow member, their non-circular configuration providing for preventing relative rotation between said hollow member and said body when the former is in either said fully inserted or in said retracted position, said passageway and said hollow member being transversely elongated corresponding to the width and being transversely constricted corresponding to the thickness of the tool to afford substantially unobstructed airflow through said tool, and retaining means associated with said body and said hollow member to secure said hollow member in either of its operative positions.

5. In a vacuum cleaner tool, a nozzle body having dissimilar surface contacting structures on opposite sides thereof, said body being formed with a noncircular passageway extending thereinto between said sides and having a closed inner end, said body having openings between the respective surface contacting structures and opposite sides of said passageway, and a hollow member formed with a port in one side and insertable in either of two positions in said passageway. so as to cause said port to register selectively with one or the other of said openings, said member having an open inner end which is closed by the inner end of said passageway when the member is fully inserted in the passageway, said member being partially retractable in said passageway to space said open inner end from said closed inner end to provide simultaneous communication between both of said openings and the interior of said hollow member, said passageway and said hollow member being transversely elongated corresponding to the width and being transversely constricted corresponding to the thickness of the tool to afford substantially unobstructed airflow through said tool, and detent means to secure said hollow member in either of its operative positions.

6. in a vacuum cleaner tool, a nozzle body having dissimilar surface contacting structures on opposite sides thereof, said body being formed with a noncircular passageway extending thereinto between said sides and having a closed inner end, said body having openings between the respective surface contacting structures and opposite sides of said passageway, a hollow member formed with a port in one side and insertable in either of two positions in said passageway so as to cause said port to register with one or the other of said openings, said member having an open inner end which is closed by 5 the inner end of said passageway when the member is fully inserted in the passageway, said member being partially retractable to space said open inner end from said closed inner end to provide simultaneous communication between both of said openings and the interior of said hollow member, and spring pressed detent means for releasably retaining said hollow member in either said fully inserted position or in said partially retracted position, said passageway and said hollow member being transversely elongated corresponding to the width and being transversely constricted corresponding to the thickness of the tool to afford substantially unobstructed airflow through said tool.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS FOREIGN PATENTS Great Britain Switzerland May 1, France Mar. 8,

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1860854 *Apr 26, 1927May 31, 1932Electrolux CorpSuction cleaner nozzle
US2501289 *May 24, 1949Mar 21, 1950Flournoy Orndorff MarvinPressure fountain cleaning sponge
US2643413 *Nov 28, 1949Jun 30, 1953Angelo Buccasio NicholasSuction cleaning tool
CH213420A * Title not available
FR882711A * Title not available
GB191329038A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3080599 *Feb 19, 1959Mar 12, 1963Electrolux AbSuction nozzle
US5014389 *Nov 15, 1989May 14, 1991Concept Inc.Foot manipulated suction head and method for employing same
US5253538 *Apr 26, 1991Oct 19, 1993Dryden Engineering Co., Inc.Method and device for quantifying particles on a surface
US5437651 *Sep 1, 1993Aug 1, 1995Research Medical, Inc.Medical suction apparatus
US5655258 *Mar 12, 1996Aug 12, 1997Heintz; J. AaronDevice for aspirating fluids from hospital operating room floor
US5720078 *Mar 11, 1997Feb 24, 1998Heintz; J. AaronDevice for aspirating fluids from hospital operating room floor
US5906025 *May 20, 1997May 25, 1999Johnson; Theodore D.Ring-shaped suction head for evacuating fluids from surgical operating room floors
US8826484Aug 6, 2012Sep 9, 2014Thomas K. SchultheisUpward extending brush for floor cleaner
US20120267423 *Apr 19, 2011Oct 25, 2012Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Company, Ltd.Methods and Apparatus for Thin Die Processing
WO2001015590A1 *Aug 9, 2000Mar 8, 2001Olsen GaryFluid recovery suction head
Classifications
U.S. Classification15/417, 15/421, 15/420
International ClassificationA47L9/06
Cooperative ClassificationA47L9/068, A47L9/06
European ClassificationA47L9/06, A47L9/06G