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Publication numberUS2966906 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 3, 1961
Filing dateOct 30, 1956
Priority dateOct 30, 1956
Publication numberUS 2966906 A, US 2966906A, US-A-2966906, US2966906 A, US2966906A
InventorsWiltrout Creed A
Original AssigneeWiltrout Creed A
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Traction belts
US 2966906 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jan. 3, 1961 c. A, WILTROUT TRACTION BELTS Filed 001:. 30, 1956 INVENTbR. Creed A. W/Hr'oaf A TTUR/VE Y This invention relates to an improvement in traction belts and deals particularly with an apparatus capable of holding a foot board at a predetermined distance from the waist of the wearer, and the method of applying the same.

During recent years the use of traction belts has become increasingly popular. These belts are generally sized for two inches and normally include a body-encircling portion with straps sewn down the sides and buckled to a foot board. A considerable difficulty is experienced in providing the necessary tension in the straps extending from the belt to the foot board. A pull upon these straps tends to cause the belt to slip downwardly on the body. Accordingly, unless the belt encircling the body is tightened to an uncomfortable degree slippage of the belt will occur.

Accordingly, it is an object of the present invention to avoid the previous difficulty found with these known types of traction belts and to size my improved belt for a great deal more than two inch fittings.

Another feature of the invention is to provide an improved traction belt designed to extend around the waist of the wearer and includes connecting straps extending from opposite sides of the belt to engage opposite ends of a cross member. This cross member normally extends beneath the feet of the patient and as the traction straps pull down the traction belt snugs up without pressure on thelower abdomen.

A feature of the present invention resides in the provision of a traction belt having a body encircling member and connecting straps extending from opposite sides of the belt to a foot engaging cross member. The connecting straps are at least partially doubled and ends of the strap extend through slip rings or other such means to extend in opposite directions about the body. When these straps are secured in body encircling position any pull upon the straps is transmitted around the waist to the opposite side of the body. Thus, if the upper portions of the straps lie outwardly of the body-encircling belt, any pull upon the straps tends to tighten the engagement of the belt about the body.

A feature of the present invention resides in the provision of a traction belt having a body-encircling belt portion which is split and which may be secured to encircle the waist of the patient. A pair of strap guiding rings or other suitable means are provided on each side of the belt. A doubled strap extends downwardly from each side of the belt, the ends of the straps extending through the strap guiding loops or rings. The ends of the straps then are guided in opposite directions about the body of the patient and include buckle means with which the straps may be secured in body-encircling position. A downward pull upon the center portions of the doubled straps is contracted through the straps to the opposite side of the body acting to draw the body-encircling belt more tightly about the body of the patient.

A further feature of the present invention resides in the n tz is e Few r provision of guides on the body of the belt through which the straps extend. These guides act to hold the ends of the straps to the belt so that the straps will be located in a desired location when the belt is being applied and removed.

A further feature of the present invention resides in the provision of a novel means of connecting the straps to the foot board. Usually the foot board is provided with attached buckles to which the straps may be attached. In the present construction the foot board is equipped with notches near its opposite ends, these notches being narrower at the point of entrance to the notches then at the base of each notch. The bases of the notch is wide enough to accommodate the fiat strap. Accordingly, the foot board may be easily attached in adjustable loops at the ends of the straps by bending or flexing the straps during insertion into the notches. When once in place in the notch, the narrow entrance portions of the slots prevent the disassembly of the straps from the notches.

These and other objects and novel features of my invention will be more fully and clearly set forth in the following specification and claims.

In the drawings forming a part of my specification:

Figure l is a front elevational view of a traction belt showing the arrangement of straps therein.

Figure 2 is a rear elevational view of the belt shown in Figure 1.

Figure 3 is a side elevational view of one side of the belt.

Figure 4 is a perspective view of the lower extremity of one of thebelt members.

Figure 5 is a perspective view of the foot board.

Figure 6 is a side elevational view of the lower extremity of one of the belts.

The belt is indicated in general by the letter A. The belt is designed to encircle the body above the hips and around the waist and includes ends 10 and 11 on opposite sides of the front center. These ends 10 and 11 are designed to overlap to some extent, the end 11 overlying a portion of the end 10 in normal arrangement. Straps 12 are anchored at 13 to the belt end 10 at a point opposite from the extremity thereof. These straps 12 are designed to support buckles 14 of any suitable metal.

Straps 15 are connected to the belt end 10 at a point materially opposite from the extremity thereof as indicated at 16. These straps 15 are designed to extend into the buckles 14 and to be held by these buckles to hold the body of the belt A in body-encircling position.

A pair of guide straps 17 extend from top to bottom of the belt at points opposite from the ends 10 and 11 of the belt A, these guide straps being located forwardly of the hips when the belt is in place. These guide straps 17 are secured to the body of the belt A along vertically spaced lines of connection, the upper two lines of connection 19 and 20 forming a loop between the guide strap 17 and the body of the belt for the accommodation of one traction strap and the lower two spaced lines of connection 21 and 22 forming a second loop for the accommodation of a portion of the other traction strap. Thus, the guide straps 17 form in effect flat guide loops for holding the two traction straps at the proper elevation.

A second pair of guide straps 23 extends from the top of the belt body toward the lower edge thereof, these straps being secured to the body of the belt at the upper ends 24, and at transverse lines of connection 25 at points spaced from the upper ends 24. These straps 23 are diagonally folded as indicated in Figure 3 to provide longitudinally extending center portions 26, and to support rectangular loops 27. The straps 23 are secured to the belt body along diagonal lines of stitching 28. The straps 23 are also diagonally folded at 29, and terminate in. upwardly extending portions anchored at their upper.

ends to the belt body at 3.0. Rectangular loops 33 are anchored at the diagonal folds by rows of stitching 32. The: upwardly extending portion of, each strap 23 is anchored to thebelt at a-point 31 spacedfrom the upper end of the strap to providea loop for the accommodation of oneof the traction belt straps which willbe later described.

The body of the belt is formed of two panels, 34 and 35 of strong fabric provided with a soft fleecy inner surface. A panel 36 of elastic fabric is provided between the: panels 34 and 35 to overlie the center of. the back. The elastic panel 36 is preferably slightly wider at its lower edge than at its upper edge to better fit the portion ofthe body encircled by the belt. The advantage of. this elastic panel 36 will be later described.

The upper and lower edges of the fabric panels 34 and 35 are bound. by suitable binding tape such as 37 and 39 to provide edges which are rounded and which will not cut into the flesh of the patient. The binding tapes37 and- 39 usuallyextend continuously from the ends of the panels connected to the elastic panel. 36 to the free. ends and 11 and extend continuously around these ends as is indicated in Figure 1 of the drawings.

The traction straps are shown in Figures 4 and 6 of the drawings to be centrally doubled intermediate the ends thereof, the doubled center portion 4t} supporting a connecting loop or ring 41. One belt is indicated in general by the numeral 42 while the other belt is indicated in general by the numeral 43. Both belts are similar in construction.

The belt 42 is folded at 40 to include the loop 41 and the. ends 44 and 45 of the belt extend upwardly'and through the guide loops on one side of the belt, the end 44 extending through the guide loop 27 and the other end 45 extending through the guide loop 33. The end 44 extends forwardly overlying the lower portion of the front of the belt, extending through a loop between the lines of connection 21. and 22 of one guide strap 17 and being of sufficient length to extend past the front center portion of the belt, terminating as indicated in Figure 1 at 46. The rear portion of this same belt extends through the guide ring 33 slightly to therear of the body and extends over the lower portion of the rear of the belt to extend diagonally upwardly across the back of the belt and beneath the guide strap 23 between the points of connection 30 and 31. This belt portion 45 then continues around the side of the body above the hip bones and through the loop formed by the lines of connection 24 and 25 of one guide strap 23, terminating in a belt buckle 47 located to the right of the center of the belt and near the upper edge thereof. The strap portion 45 also extends between one guide strap 17 and the body of the belt between the lines of connection 19 and 20.

A short strap of material49 is secured to the belt end 44 on opposite sides of the portion of this belt extending between the guide strap 17 and the body ofthe belt on the left side of the center. This strap 49 is anchored at its ends to the belt end 44 so as to encircle a portion of the strap 17 to prevent this end of the strap from being removed from beneath the guide strap. This, atrangement is provided to prevent the strap from being detached and improperly replaced.

The opposite traction belt 43 is similarly formed. One end 59 of the belt 43 extends forwardly through one guide loop 27 between the guide strap 17 and the body of the belt on the right side of the front of the belt, and extends diagonally across the front and upwardly to terminate in a free end 51. A short strap. member 52 is connected to the belt end and overlies the strap 17 to hold the strap end from withdrawal from beneath the guide strap 17. The opposite end 53 0f the strap 43 extends forwardly through a guide loop 33- and extends diagonally across the. backof the belt andbeneath. the

guide strap 23 on the left rear side of the belt between the lines of connection 30 and 31. The strap end 53 then encircles the upper portion of the left side of the belt, and extends beneath the guide straps 23 and 17 to terminate in a buckle 54 which is located near the upper edge of the belt on the left side of center. The belt end 53 extends between the lines of connection 24 and 250i the guide strap 23 and between the lines of connection 19 and 20 of the guide strap 17, the strap 53 is sewn to belt A (not shown) near buckle 54 to prevent slippage and the withdrawal of the strap.

The central portion vof the belt43 is supported by the rectangular loops, 27 and 33 on the right side of the traction belt to extend downwardly from the belt. The rectangular loops fold the belt neatly and flatly so as to insure the comfort of the patient, and supports a loop 41 similar to that shown in Figures 3 and 4 of the draw- The foot engaging boardis indicated in general by the numeral 55 and comprises a short length of finished board having smoothly rounded edges and of a, width sufficient to extend beyond the feet of the patient on opposite sides thereof. Spaced notches 56 are provided in one edge of the .boardgto accommodate strap loops which will bedescribed- Bases of the notches 56 are approximately equalin width to the width of the straps forming the loops but the inlet portions of these notches are usually narrower. As a result the straps must be bent during insertion and removal from the notches and the natural tendency of the strap to remain flat prevents them from being accidentally disengaged from the notch.

As is. indicated in Figures 4 and 6 of the drawings connecting straps such as 57 are provided to connect the loops 41, at the lower folded ends of the, traction straps to the foot board 55. The straps 57 are provided with short looped end 59 encircling the lower side of the loop 41 and an opposite end 60 which is looped over the center bar 61 of a belt clasp 62. The clasp 62 comprising a rectangular wire loop having a central crossmember 61 anchored to the belt end. The strap 57 extends through the clasp extending on one side of the rectangular loop end on the opposite side of the center bar 61. The loop is preferably roughened to prevent slippage of the belt relative thereto. The clasp 62 provides a means of shortening and lengthening the effective length of the straps 57. Obviously, by moving the clasp upwardly while the belt is slack the distance between the upper end59 and the lower folded end 63 of the belt 57 may be shortened. By binding the clasp 62 downwardly this distance may be increased. The folded lower end of the strap 57 is looped about a portion of the foot board 55, the strap engaging in an increasing notch 56.

The belt is applied in the manner which will be described. The belt is placed to encircle the waist of the patient with the ends 10 and 11 of the belt overlapping. The straps 15 are then inserted through the bucklesfl iand pulled tight so that the resilient panel 36 is slightly extended in length. The straps 57 are adjusted to approximately the proper length and the looped lower ends of these straps are placed to encircle the. foot board 55 and engaged in the notches 56.

The traction straps 4-2 and 43 are then drawn tight to provide the necessary pull upon the foot board. This is accomplished by engaging the end 46 of one strap in the buckle 47 at the opposite end of the same strap. The end 51 of the other traction belt is also engaged in the buckle 54 at the opposite end of this strap. As the belts are drawn tight, they apply pressure against a side of the body above the hips, the tension of the strap at the right'side of the belt applying pressure against the left side of the body and the pull upon the strap at the left side of the belt applying pressure to the right side of the body.

Any increase inforce upon the tractionstraps acts to tighten the beltupon the body and to. apply additional pressure above the hips. As a result of this arrangement, the normal tendency of the traction straps to pull the belt downwardly upon the body is eliminated.

The guide rings or loops are preferably located slightly to the front and slightly to the rear of the sides of the hips so as to provide equal tension on the front and the rear portions of the straps. As the free ends of the traction belts are held in place by the anchoring straps 49 and 52 and by the buckles 47 and 54 at the opposite ends of the straps, there is no tendency for the straps to become disengaged when detached, thus preventing improper reinsertion of the belt straps.

The elastic panel 36 forms an important part of the present invention. While elastic inserts have been previously used in belts of a difierent type, they have not been practical in traction belts, as the pull from the foot board acts to expand the belt and draw it downwardly on the hips. As a result, traction belts have usually been made in numerous sizes, as it is essential that the belt fit tightly and that the straps be secured to the belt at the sides thereof.

With the elastic panel 36, not only does the belt fit better and more comfortably, but by properly adjusting the belt strap 15, the elastic may be expanded to position the strap supporting loops at the proper location on the body. The belt tightening straps may be loose or tight to suit the individual need. As a result, the effective size of the belt may be varied over substantial limits, greatly reducing the number of stock sizes which must be available to fit various persons.

In accordance with the patent statutes, I have described the principles of construction and operation of my traction belt, and while I have endeavored to set forth the best embodiment thereof, I desire to have it understood that obvious changes may be made within the scope of the following claims without departing from the spirit of my invention.

I claim:

1. A traction belt including a waist encircling belt member, traction straps extending from opposite sides of said belt member, guide means on said belt member near opposite sides thereof, said straps encircling said belt member and having portions guided by said guide means to depend from opposite sides of said belt member.

2. A traction belt including a waist encircling belt member, guide means on said belt member near opposite sides thereof, and traction straps having ends extending through a corresponding guide means on one side of said belt member, the strap ends extending around the belt member in opposite directions and means adjustably connecting the strap ends whereby a downward pull on a traction strap extending from one side of the belt will be transmitted against the opposite side of the belt body.

3. A traction belt including a belt member adapted to encircle a body at the waist, guide means attached to opposite sides of said belt member near the portions of the member overlying the hips, traction straps each including strap ends extending through a corresponding guide means and diverging to extend about the belt member in opposite directions, and means connecting said strap ends whereby a pull upon a traction belt on one side of the body will be transmitted to the opposite side of said body.

4. A traction belt including a split belt member adapted to encircle the body at the waist, means on the belt for connecting the ends of the belt member in body encircling position, strap guide means secured to the portions of said belt member assigned to overlie the hips, traction straps having end portions extending through said strap guide means, one strap end of each strap extending across the rear of the belt member and about the portion of the belt member above the opposite strap guide, and the other Strap ends extending across the front portion of belt and means for connecting the ends of each strap, whereby a pull upon the portion of a traction strap extending below one strap guide means will be transmitted to the opposite side of the belt member.

5. The structure described in claim 4 and including means on said belt member for slidably supporting said straps and holding the same at a desired elevation on said belt member.

6. The structure described in claim 4 and in which said strap ends extend diagonally across the front and rear portions of the belt member.

7. The structure described in claim 4 and including a foot board connecting the portions of said straps removed from said belt member.

8. The structure described in claim 5 and in which said traction straps are doubled between their ends, and including strap extensions, loops connecting said extensions to the doubled portions of said belt, and a foot board connected to said strap extensions.

9. The structure described in claim 8 and in which said foot board includes notches in which said strap extensions are engaged, said notches being wider than said strap extensions at the bases of the notches, but narrower than said strap extensions at the entrance portion thereof.

10. A traction belt comprising an elongated band designed to encircle the waist, means on said band for connecting the ends thereof in waist encircling position, a traction strap depending from each side of the center of the band to depend from the portion of the band overlying the hips of the wearer, each strap being doubled and including ends slidably attached to the band in body encircling position, means for attaching together the ends of each strap, and a panel of elastic material between the points of attachment of said straps to said belt.

11. An adjustable traction belt of a variable size comprising in combination a waist engaging band including a split belt member joined at the back by an elastic strip and adapted to be connected at the front, fastening means on the belt for connecting the front of said split belt, a one traction strap having fastening end sections extending about one side of said belt and diagonally across the front and at the rear of said belt member and an intermediate continuous looped section depending downwardly at the relative opposite side of said belt, a second traction strap having fastening end sections extending about one side of said belt above said indicated continuous loop section of saidone traction strap and an intermediate continuous looped section depending downwardly at the relative opposite side of said belt, adjustable fastening means for said fastening ends of said traction belts, guide means for retaining said traction straps about said belt, guide ring means for supporting said depending looped sections in relatively spaced relationship on each side of said belt, and adjustable traction strap means connected to each of said depending looped sections, whereby said elastic in said traction belt permits fitting of the belt about various sized waists and said guide ring means for supporting said depending looped sections permits comfortable spacing adjustment thereof upon application of tension to said traction straps.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 716,221 Hage Dec. 16, 1902 732,591 Schufilay June 30, 1903 798,367 Smokey Aug. 29, 1905 2,638,091 Varco May 12, 1953

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US716221 *Aug 31, 1901Dec 16, 1902Francis J Hage SrHernial truss.
US732591 *Mar 28, 1903Jun 30, 1903Joseph SchufflayCorset.
US798367 *May 4, 1905Aug 29, 1905Joseph H F SmokeyObstetrical appliance.
US2638091 *Sep 11, 1951May 12, 1953Varco SamuelPelvic traction belt
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3176684 *Nov 15, 1962Apr 6, 1965Lee S Orthopedic Appliances InPelvic traction belt
US3452747 *Oct 20, 1965Jul 1, 1969Samuel VarcoPelvic traction belt
US4586494 *Nov 16, 1983May 6, 1986National Research Development Corp.Pelvic belt
US4865022 *Apr 19, 1989Sep 12, 1989Gorsen Robert MSelf applicable spring loaded pelvic traction device
US4907576 *Jan 18, 1989Mar 13, 1990Curlee James DOrthopaedic device using non-stretch material and method for its manufacture
US5258017 *May 8, 1990Nov 2, 1993Harold MyersTraction device
US5375279 *Feb 25, 1993Dec 27, 1994Toso; VictorCombination stretching and back support device
US6468240Jan 8, 2001Oct 22, 2002The Saunders Group, Inc.Self-seating occiput wedge system for applying a therapeutic traction force
US6506174Oct 31, 1995Jan 14, 2003The Saunders Group, Inc.Portable traction device
US6899690Dec 16, 2002May 31, 2005The Saunders Group, Inc.Portable cervical traction device
US6971997Nov 17, 2003Dec 6, 2005The Saunders Group, Inc.Multi-axis cervical and lumber traction table
US7108671Jan 5, 2004Sep 19, 2006The Saunders Group, Inc.Portable lumbar traction device
US7189214Jan 22, 2002Mar 13, 2007The Saunders Group, Inc.Multi-axis cervical and lumbar traction table
US7566314Jun 5, 2006Jul 28, 2009The Saunders Group, Inc.Portable cervical traction device
US7757305Jan 7, 2005Jul 20, 2010Nada Concepts, Inc.Lower body garment with integral back support
US8083705Jan 5, 2009Dec 27, 2011Empi Corp.Portable cervical traction device
US8230521Jul 19, 2010Jul 31, 2012Nada Concepts, Inc.Lower body garment with integral back support
Classifications
U.S. Classification602/36
International ClassificationA61F5/04
Cooperative ClassificationA61F5/04
European ClassificationA61F5/04