Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS296706 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 8, 1884
Publication numberUS 296706 A, US 296706A, US-A-296706, US296706 A, US296706A
InventorsMichael O Maea
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Pattern for car-axle boxes
US 296706 A
Abstract  available in
Images(4)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

(M0de1.) 4 Sheets-Sh'eet 1.

M. OMARA.

PATTERN FOR. GAR AXLE BOXES.

Patented Apr. 8, 1884.

i 4 Sheets-Shet '2. M. OMARA. PATTERN FO-R GAR AXLE BOXES.

No. 296,706. Patented 8, 1884.

JNVENTOI? WITNESSES m. vcs'ins. PhBlc-Ldhognphen Wmhhgion. n. c.

. (ModeL') 4 Sheets-Sheet. 3.

M; OMARA.

PATTERN FOR UAR AXLE BOXES.

- Patented Apr. 8, 1884.

Ckce Flask IIV VENTOI? Afforney i WITNESSES Modem v 4 Sheets-Sheet 4. M. OMARA.

PATTERN FOR GAR, AXLE BOXES Patented/Apr. 8, 1 884,. .5-

w F B.

WITNESSES I 6216M ry w 95 5 m? x n. warms.- Photu-Lmngnylmn Wnhinyur 0.1:.

MICHAEL OMARA, OF CHARLESTON, SOUTH CAROLINA.

PATTERN FOR CAR-AXLE BOXES.

SPECIFICATION forming part of Letters Patent No. 296,706, dated April 8, 1884.

Application filed December 17, 1893. (ModelJ To all whom it may concern;-

Be it known that I, MroHAEL OMARA, a citizen of the United States, residing at Charleston, in the county of Charleston and State of South Carolina, have invented cer tain new and useful Improvements in the Patterns for Car-Axle Boxes, of which the following is a specification, reference being had therein to the accompanying drawings, forming part of the same. l

My invention has relation to patterns for casting ear-axle boxes; and the object is to dispense with the large and cumbersome drysand core, and at the same time greatly to facilitate and cheapen the cost of manufacture of said boxes, whereby they may be placed upon the market ata minimum cost; and to these ends the novelty consists in the construction of the pattern, as will be hereinafter more fully described.

Figure 1 is aperspective view of a cast-iron caraxle box of the form in general use. Fig. 2 is a perspective view of my improved pattern for casting the above form of axle-box, with the detachable parts shown separated. Fig. 3 is a view of the hinge-lug, dry-sand core. Fig. i is a view of the dust-guard recess-core, reduced in size, which is made of dry sand in two parts, a 0, to facilitate its insertion in the mold. Fig. 5 represents the cheek-flask on the follow-board and the shell B rammed half-way up. Fig. 6 is a top plan view of the same, with the half portion E of the dust-guard box and the rabbet-strip C in place and the flask rammed flush with the top of the shell. Fig. 7 shows theside D in place and the cope portion of the flask on and rammed; and Fig. 8 shows the cheek and cope turned over and the drag in place and rammed. Fig. 9 is a perspective view of the removable half of the dust-guard box-pattern, and Fig. 10 is a longitudinal vertical section of the mold ready for casting.

A is the pattern, and consists of the shell B, rabbet-st-rip C, side D, and one half E of the dost-guard box-pattern, which has tongues a v a, working in guides a c in the shell B. The

rest of the pattern is all in one piece with the shell B, including the core-prints c c of the hinge-lug F, and the core-print e of the dustguard recesscore. The parts I) b of the shell B are detachably secured thereto in the usual manner. The detachable parts are removed from the shell B, and it is placed on the follow-board with its open side uppermost, (see Fig. 7,) and the cheek-flask placed thereon. The molding sand is then rammed in to a distance of about half-way the height of the shell, (see 5,) and the detachable half E of the dust-guard box pattern and rabbet-strlp O are then placed in proper position in the shell, and the balance of the molding-sand filled 1n and rammed, and the parting made flush with the upper surface of theshell. The s de D is then placed in position, the cope portion of the flask adjusted to the cheek, and then filled and rammed with sand. (See Fig. 7.) The two cope and cheek flasks and the followboard are then turned over together, the follow-board removed, the parts b I) put on B, and the parting made as in the first instance. The drag-flask is now adjusted to the other side of the cheek-flask, and filled and rammed as before. (See Fig. 8.) This third or drag flask is now lifted off, and the shell B drawn out of the cheek-flask, the part E and the part C remaining upon the side D in the second or check flask. One half, 0, of the dust-guard recess-core is now placed in its position in the cheek-flask, being held in said position in the mold in one-half of the recess left by the coreprint 6, and the hingelug core is also inserted, it being held in proper position by the ends 1 k, which correspond to the lug core-prints on the shell B, The third or drag flask is now restored to its place on the cheek-flask, and the three flasks clamped together, and their position reversed. with the second or cope flask on top, which is now removed, with the side D remaining in it, which is then drawn out. The part E and the part 0 are now drawn out of the cheek-flask, and the remaining half, a, of the dust-guard recesscore is set in place. The sprue is now made in the second or cope flask, and the flasks are now clamped together, and the mold is complete and ready for the running of the molten metal.

Heretofore these boxes have been cast from a pattern made in two halves, and a large cumbersome dry-sand core was used, and when the casting was made there was always a number of fins in places where the metal run in the joint between the core and the mold, and these had to be chipped oft, involving adis run in.

ditional expense, and also Where the dry-sand core is used the casting is often of unequal thickness, owing to the difficulty of placing it in its exact position in the mold and its great liability to shift in the mold when the metal All these objections are overcome by my invention, and a casting of even and regular thickness produced.

Having thus fully described my invention, What I claim as new and useful, and desire to secure by Letters Patent of the United States, 1s

1. A pattern for casting car-axle boxes, consisting of the shell B, having one .part, 6, of the dust-guard box-pattern E, and of the removable rabbet-strip G, the side D, and the separate part E of the dust-guard box-pattern, as shown and described.

2. A pattern for casting oar-axle boxes, consisting of the shell B, having the core-print e and one part, 6, of the dust-guard box E, and of the removable rabbet-strip O, the side D, and the separate part E of the dust-guard box-pattern, in combination with the divided dust-guard box-core a 0, as and for the purpose set forth. a

3. A pattern for casting ear-aXle boxes, consisting of the shell B, having oore-prints c c and 6, one part, 6, of the dust-guard box E, and of the removable rabbetstrip O, the side D, and the separate part E of the dust-guard box-pattern, in combination with the divided dust-guard box-core n 0 and the hinge-lug core h i, as set forth.

In testimony that I claim the foregoing I ap pend my signature.

MICHAEL OMARA. Witnesses:

A. G. HEYLMUN, EDWARD WEBSTER.

Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4552872 *Feb 1, 1984Nov 12, 1985The Procter & Gamble CompanyPenetrating topical pharmaceutical compositions containing corticosteroids
US4557934 *Jun 21, 1983Dec 10, 1985The Procter & Gamble CompanyPenetrating topical pharmaceutical compositions containing 1-dodecyl-azacycloheptan-2-one
Classifications
Cooperative ClassificationB22C7/005