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Publication numberUS2967362 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 10, 1961
Filing dateAug 15, 1957
Priority dateOct 29, 1953
Publication numberUS 2967362 A, US 2967362A, US-A-2967362, US2967362 A, US2967362A
InventorsJoseph Montoscuro
Original AssigneeJoseph Montoscuro
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Insole construction for a shoe
US 2967362 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

quay-" 5 J. MONTOSCURO INSOLE CONSTRUCTION FOR A SHOE Original Filed 001:. 29, 1953 United States Patent INSOLE CONSTRUCTION FOR A SHOE Joseph Montoscuro, 724 N. Sawyer Ave., Chicago, Ill.

Original application Oct. 29, 1953, Ser. No. 389,003,

now Patent No. 2,814,132, dated Nov. 26, 1957. Divkideg and this application Aug. 15, 1957, Ser. No.

Claims. (Cl. 36-37) This invention relates to shoe structures for men's, womens, and childrens shoes, and more particularly relates to an improvement in insole and shank constructions to make it possible for a person to walk straight without overrunning the heels, and particularly in womens high-heeled shoes to prevent the heel from becoming misaligned because of the slight support provided by the usual shoe constructions; and this invention is a division of my co-pending application Serial No. 389,003, filed October 29, 1953, now United States Patent 2,814,- 132, granted November 26, 1957.

The invention has among its objects the production of a shoe construction for mens, womens, and childrens shoes in combination with the conventional heel and sole which may be incorporated in shoes as they are originally manufactured or shoes already in use, and in which a custom shoe operation by a shoe repairman, the improvement may be applied to the original shoe construction.

Another object of the invention is to provide an improved insole construction for mens, womens, and childrens shoes which may be applied to existing shoes by the wearer without requiring the services of a skilled shoe repairman.

Another object of the invention is to provide an insole construction for new and used shoes for relieving the shocks to the human system incident to walking on the sidewalks, and particularly to insole constructions for boots and shoes for use in diminishing such shocks either in Walking or standing over long periods of time at ones occupation.

Still another object of the invention is the production of an insole construction and shoe constructions for minimizing and relieving the shocks to the heels, feet, and other parts of the human body.

. Still another object of the invention is the production of an insole for boot and shoe constructions which may be readily applied to the boots and shoes for the purpose of minimizing any shocks or fatigue in walking or standing, which is long-lasting, and wherein the resiliency may be adjusted to conform to the weight of the person wearing the shoes or the particular needs of the persons.

Still another object of the invention is to provide an improved shoe construction, particularly for certain types of womens shoes, which will assist in maintaining the shoe in place on the wearers foot in walking and will also prevent ankles from becoming turned over.

Still another object of the invention, particularly with respect to womens high-heeled shoes, is to prevent chafing across the back of the heel by the straps.

A further object of the invention is the production of a shoe construction for incorporation with footwear in which the device is unaflfected by the elements.

Still another object of the invention is the production of an insole construction and footwear incorporating the device which is durable, efiicient, economical, requiring a minimum of parts, and wherein the serviceability is not decreased over a period of usage.

' Many other objects and advantages of the construction use, is unseen.

herein shown and described will be obvious to those skilled in the art from the disclosure herein given.

Applicant is aware that there have been many inventions in the past and also that there are devices on the market for the purpose of relieving shocks to the foot and particularly to the heel. Although applicants device is incorporated for use with shoes having leather, composition, or rubber heels in which the composition or rubber heel is primarily for decreasing the shock to the wearer, nevertheless, because of its wear, this utility of the composition or rubber heel decreases with wear until the heel becomes run over or worn out. With applicants device, resiliency is maintained throughout the use of the shoe regardless of the amount of wear; and, because of an improved construction for womens shoes, particu larly in the arch and heel construction, the tendency for the heels to turn over is prevented, and there is improvement in the wearers ability to walk properly. Although resilient members, in the past, have been provided between the portions of the heel pad and the heel construction, the present device is not unsightly and, in normal The type of spring used is such that, when collapsed, the thickness thereof is substantially one coil and the conical spiral spring selected corresponds to the amount of resiliency required for the walking characteristics of the wearer, and permits the shoe to be normally positioned with each step taken. Applicants construction may be readily applied to any style of boot or shoe whether mens, womens, or childrens without altering substantially the outside appearance thereof, and is equally adaptable for either fancy, dress, or work boots and shoes.

To this end my invention consists in the novel construction, arrangement, and combination of parts herein shown and described, and more particularly pointed out in the claims.

In the drawings, wherein like reference characters indicate like or corresponding parts:

Fig. 1 is a view in side elevation, partly in section, illustrating a womans shoe incorporating the insole construction of the invention;

Fig. 2 illustrates the heel constructionof the invention applied to a mans shoe;

Fig. 3 is a plan view illustrating a modified form of a heel plate for a shoe for incorporating the device of theinvention; and,

Fig. 4 is a view in cross section taken along the line 4-4 of Fig. 3 and looking in the direction of the arrows.

Referring to my United States Patent 2,814,132, there is illustrated an insole construction, the features of which are applicable to the constructions disclosed in this divisional application, or also may be applied to new and used shoes to improve the walking characteristics of the person by preventing turning over of the heels, especially in womens high-heeled shoes, and the running over of the lifts of the heel whether leather, composition, or rubber. The insole 41 includes a heel portion 25 provided with a hole 42 to receive a conical spiral spring 13. The number of coils and the compression may be varied, depending upon the characteristics of the wearer, though, for normal use, a spring which may be readily compressed by ones hand is sufiicient. The front end of the heel pad 44 is formed with two tapered tabs 18, which are complementally formed to be inserted within the slots 29 of the insole. The slots 29 are formed as illustrated in my United States Patent 2,814,132 to receive these tapered tabs 18, and the forward bottom edge of the heel pad is also suitably skived to reduce the thickness so that, when assembled, the heel pad appears as a continuation of an insole. The size of the spring is such that, when compressed, the spring is retained within the hole 42 since the coils of the spring nest.

Although a preferred construction of this form of insole is preferably formed from leather, it is to be understood that it may be suitably formed from plastic material or combinations of thin sheets of leather and foam rubber, or felt constructions to provide a soft inner-sole construction to absorb the shocks encountered in walking.

Referring to my United States Patent 2,814,132; there is illustrated another embodiment of; the insole construcion. and n which p lar y a apt dfq us m repair of womens shoes to particularly preventtheheel of high-heeled shoes from turning in or out because of the improper stride of the wearer in walking, An insole 41 is. similarly provided with a heel portion 25 as the embodiment of my United States Patent 2,814,132 with a, hole 42 for the reception of a conical spring 13, In this embodiment, it is preferred, that the springshall be as shown.

Referring to my United States Patent 2,814,132, a heel plate 25 formed of suitable ferrous metal, preferably a high carbon steel, although other suitable non-ferr ous material such as brass may be used, the type of material depending upon the weight placed on the shoe. It is preferred, however, to use a heat-treated, thin steel heel plate. The heel plate 25 is complementally formed to the shape of the heel portion and shank portion of the insole, and is provided with countersunk holes 26 for the application of suitable securing means127 and.2,8. The, securing means 27 maybe in the form of a wood screw whereas the securing means 28 is a. countersunk machine screw and special nut 28. The heel plate 25 isprovided with slots 29 conforming to the similar slots of my United States Patent 2,814,132. It is within the scope of my invention that the slots 29 may receive the metal tabsaccording to the disclosure, which extend through slots in the heel pad, Fig. 3, as disclosed in my aforementioned, patent, and the ends of the tabs are turned over and crimped to afiix the tabs to the heel pad. The heel pad is also skived at the bottom front edge. to permit the heel pad, when assembled, to be substantially a continuation of the insole. The metal tabs perform the same function as the tapered tabs 18 but the metal permits-of greater flexing and longer wear than the integrally formed tabs of leather. The inner ends of the metal tabs arealso more. firmly latched than the inner ends of the tabs ofone of. the embodiments of my aforementioned patent, since the heel plate 25 is firmly affixed to the.- insole when the. insole is assembled in a shoe construction, as illustrated in Fig. 1. Although this construction.isprimarily adapted for custom remodeling, it is equally adaptable. as a re-- placeable insole without being affixed and placed within the shoe by the securing means 27 and 28. The heel pad and insole of this embodiment, likewise, may be fabricated from other material than leather, such as plastic orcombinations of plastic and leather with sponge rubberor felt inserts for both the innersole and the heel pad.

Referring to Fig. 1, there is illustrated a sling-back type, womans shoe 34 in which the invention has been applied by rebuilding in order to prevent the usual 01fsetting of the heel because of the improper stride of the wearer. The insole construction of my United States Patent 2,814,132 of which this application is a division has been applied in part, certain modifications being incorporated because of the construction of the shank stiffener. The heel 35 of the shoe 34 has been recessed or bored at 36 to substantially the depth of a rearwardly extending portion 37 of a shank stiffener or shank-piece 38 of the shoe. A lower coil 39 of the conical spiral spring 13 is inserted beneath the rearwardly extending portion '37 of the shank stiffener instead of being affixed to the heel pad as described with reference to. the above mentioned patent. It is preferred to construct the shoe, in this manner for custom rebuilding or in the original shoe since the spring may be better retained in position. If necessary, a suitable securing means 40, such, as a.

wood screw may be afiixed through the shank stiffener, as illustrated in the dotted lines.

When a shoe is custom-built in this manner, the insole 41 is first loosened from the shoe for a distance so that the auxiliary heel plate 25 may be secured in position after the hole has been bored with the hole 42 in alignment with the bore 36. It is also necessary, with the insole displaced, to drill a hole through the shank of the shoe and the sole as at43 to receive the securing means 28 and a complementally formed nut- 28. An ornamental leather cushioned heel pad 44 is formed by providing an inturned edge member. providing a, receptable 45 to receive a heel pad 14, constructed as described with reference to my United States Patent 2,814,132. The receptacle 45 includes a bottom finished member 46 so that the remodeled insole includes the usual insole and the heel pad 14 and the receptacle therefor, which provides an ornamental trim to the insole at the heel pad. The heel pad- 14 comprises the tapered tabs 18 which extend through the slots 29 formed in the heel plate 25, as described with reference to my United States Patent 2,814,132. It is to be understood that it is within the scope of the invention that the modified form of heel pad of the above-mentioned patent may also, be substituted for the heel pad 14 in the fabrication of the custom-rebuilt shoe or in the fabrication of a complete shoe.

When assembled, as described above, the spring 13 normally biases the heel plate in a slightly raised position. However, when worn, the weight of the wearer compresses the spring so that the face of the bottom finished strip 46, as it abuts the upper coil 22 of the spring 13, in turn abuts the upper face of the heel plate 25.

A shoe constructed, for example, as illustrated in Fig. 1 of the attached drawings and utilizing the construction of the aforementioned patent when worn, remains correctly positioned on the wearers foot and does not tend to flop or clatter as the wearer walks, particularly womensshoes. The shoes are always correctly positioned so that there is no tendency for the wearer to walk incorrectly with the shoes to cause the heel to-turn inwardly or outwardly, depending upon the walking characteristics of the person wearing the shoes. Therefore, the shoes, also utilizing the construction of my aforementioned patent, serve as corrective shoes to aid the wearer in walking and standing correctly. In this manner, the wearer is less fatigued and there is less damage to the shoes, especially those of the high-heeled type, so that it is necessary to discard them after a slight usage whereas normally shoes should last until. it is necessary to have them resoled or become scuffed and badly worn. The improved construction permits the heel lifts to be worn off, preferably on the rear edge, than to have the improper wear onthe right or left edges sincethe construction permits the wearer to walk properly.

Referring to Fig. 2, I have illustrated a construction for custom-rebuilding mens, shoes or which may be used as the original construction. The sole is bored at 47 tov receive a conical spiral spring 13 which is heldin place in the bore by a metal clip 48 extending over the lower coil 39, and which is aifixed to the heel by securing means 40. The depth of the bore. 47, as also described with respect to the bore 36, is of sufficient depth to receive the spring, 13 in a partially compressed position. The spring is preferably held inplace in thismanner although the spring may be held in place on the heel pad by a pad,

as described with reference to the construction of my aforementioned patent. For commercial purposes, it is preferred to fabricate the heel pad so that the spring 13 may be affixed in either manner. In the original construction, it would also be possible to affix the spring as described, in, the bore and also to have the upper. coil 22v afiixed in the pocket provided by the pad 15. In a constructionof this type, it is preferred to form a hinge 49 from leather or other. suitable plastic affixed at one end to, the, lower end 20. of the heel pad 14a, which may be skived as disclosed in my aforementioned patent. The lower end of the hinge is then suitably aflixed by an adhesive to the insole of the shoe, if it is a custom-repair job, or it may be integrally formed with the insole as described with reference to the construction of the insole including the heel portion of my aforementioned patent, although it may also be formed from separate members suitably hinged together. The heel pad 14a is preferably formed from leather though it may incorporate the sponge-rubber constructions of certain forms of heel pads available to provide a softer form of pad for the heel of the wearer.

Figs. 3 and 4 illustrate a modified form of shank member from that as used in shoes (not shown) described with reference to my aforementioned patent, and Fig. l of this disclosure for use in new shoe construction whether for womens, mens, or childrens shoes. The heel plate 25' is integrally formed with the usual channel-shaped, heat-treated shank stiffener 50 of the conventional form of shank stifiener used in the fabrication of shoes. When used in this manner, it is also constructed with the countersunk holes 26 and 28 for aifixing to the heel and innersole as described with reference to Fig. 1. However, when used in this manner, the shank stiffener construction of Figs. 3 and 4 may be applied as a substitute for the shank stiffener 38, as described with reference to the construction of Fig. 1. A single slot 29" may be used and the heel pad fabricated accordingly with a single tab. However, it is within the scope of the invention that the shank construction of Figs. 3 and 4 may be similarly formed with a plurality of slots 29, as described with reference to the construction of the slots in the heel plate and Fig. 1 of this disclosure.

It is thus evident that there has been described a simple insole construction and embodiments thereof for assembly in shoes as well as a construction for use in customrebuilt shoes or shoes as originally fabricated, which are simple in construction, economical to manufacture, and easy to assemble either by the wearer or a shoe repairman.

It is also evident that the devices and constructions of this invention may be worn with shoes having either leather or composition lifts or rubber heels. The use of rubber heels with this type of device would be optional with the wearer since they will not interfere with the correct operation of the construction. The device, although preferably made to overcome the running over of womens high heels, is equally applicable for mens or boys shoes wherein excessive wear is caused by the improper walking habits of a person. It is also of particular value where a person must stand for long periods of time in one place, and where the workshoes or boots are heavy and may have steel plates or cleats applied to the heels or to under surfaces thereof. A construction has also been disclosed wherein the coil spring may be readily replaced when the resilience thereof has been destroyed or where it is desired to have a spring of different compression, depending upon the weight of the person. For ordinary usage, however, the spring need not be compressed to any greater extent than the usual rubber heel is deformed to obtain the same degree of resistance to shock when in use by the wearer.

A construction has also been disclosed wherein after the shoes have been Worn out, the spring may be removed and replaced by detaching and attaching the securing means 40 of Fig. 1 and Fig. 2; and, if the re siliency of the spring has become impaired, a new one may be replaced or the old one deformed to restore its resiliency.

Having thus described my invention, it is obvious that various immaterial modifications may be made in the same without departing from the spirit of my invention; hence I do not wish to be understood as limiting myself to the exact form, construction, arrangement and com- What I claim as new and desire to secure by Lettersv I Patent is:

1. The combination in a high-heeled shoe construction of an insole construction comprising a heelplate afiixed' to the heel and shank portion of the shoe, the upper end of the heel formed with a bore and the contiguous portion of the heelplate formed with a hole in alignment with the bore, a conically coiled spring operatively mounted in the bore and aflElxed to the shoe, said heelplate formed with laterally spaced holes, a heel pad including laterally spaced tabs operatively mounted in said.

laterally spaced holes for hingedly connecting the heel pad to the heel plate, and the heel pad operatively sup ported upon the conical coiled spring, whereby upon the shoe being worn, the heel pad is adapted to abut the heel plate and the conically coiled spring being partially compressed. 7

2. The combination in a high-heeled shoe .construc tion of an insole construction comprising a heelplate aflixed to the heel and shank portion of the shoe, the upper end of the heel formed with a bore and the contiguous portion of the heelplate formed with a hole'in alignment with the bore, a conically coiled spring operatively mounted in the bore and affixed to the shoe, said heelplate formed with laterally spaced holes, a heel pad including laterally spaced tabs operatively mounted in said laterally spaced holes for hinged-1y connecting the heel pad to the heelplate, the heel pad operatively supported upon the conical coiled spring whereby upon the shoe being Worn the heel pad is adapted to abut the heelplate and the conical-1y coiled spring being partially compressed, securing means for affixing the heelplate to the heel at one end, and additional securing means for affixing the opposite end of the heelplate to the shank portion of the shoe.

3. The combination in a high-heeled shoe construction of an insole construction comprising a heelplate afiixed to the heel and shank portion of the shoe, the upper end of the heel formed with a bore and the contiguous portion of the heelplate formed with a hole in alignment with the bore, a conically coiled spring operatively mounted in the bore and affixed to the shoe, said heelplate formed with at least one slotted hole intermediate the ends of said heelplate, a heel pad including at least one tab operatively mounted in said slotted hole for hingedly connecting the heel pad to the heel plate, said heel pad operatively supported upon the conical coiled spring whereby upon the shoe being worn, the heel pad is adapted to abut 4. The combination with a shoe, of an insole construction comprising a heelplate, channel-shaped at one end and provided at the opposite end with a heel portion, the opposite ends of the heelplate adapted to be affixed to the heel and to the shank portion of the shoe, a hole provided 'in the heel portion in alignment with a bore in the heel, a conical spiral spring operatively mounted in the bore, a heel pad operatively abutting an outer coil of the conical spiral spring, and said heel pad including at least one tab and said heelplate complementally formed to said tab for hingedly connecting the heel pad to the heelplate.

5. As an article of manufacture, a shank member including a channel-shaped inverted U-shaped arch portion and a heel portion formed with a hole adapted to receive a spring, said opposite ends of the shank formed to re- 7. eei-ve securing means for aflixing the shank to a shoe construction, and at least one slot transverse tothe longitudinal axis of the shank for hingedly connecting a heelplate to the shank.

6. The combination with a shoe construction, of a heelplate construction comprising means for hinging the heel pad. to the shank of the shoe, a conically coiled spring operatively mounted beneath the heel padand operatively connected to the heel of the shoe, a bore formed at the, heel of theshoe for receiving the conical spiral spring, means for affixing the lower coil of the spring within the bore, and said hinge means for the heel pad operatively afiixed to the shank of the shoe.

7. The combination with a shoe construction including an insole, of a heel pad construction formed with a skived. portion atone end and comprising means for hinging the heel. pad-to the shank portion of the shoe, a conically coiled spring operatively mounted beneath the heel pad and operatively connected at the heel of the shoe, a bore: formed in the sole at the location of the heel oithe shoe for receiving the conical spiral spring, means for affixing the lower coil of the spring within the. bore, said hinge means for the heel pad operatively affixedto the shank portion of the shoe, and said hinge means comprising a flexible member aflixed to the skived portion of the heel. pad at one end. and at the opposite end. ailixed. tothe. shank portion of the shoe.

8.. As. an article of manufacture, a heelplate for an insolezconstruction, said heelplate comprising a heel portiort formed with a. hole for the passage therethrough of a coiled spring, countersunk holes for affixing the heelplate atone end to the heel portion of the insole and at, the other end to theshank portion of the innersole,rand at least one slot transverse to the axis of the heelplatefor receiving a. complementally formed tab of a heel; pad for affixing a heel padto the insole.

9. The combination with a shoe construction including an internal, cushion heel, of a. heel pad construction formed with. a. skived portion at one end and comprising hinge means for the heel pad, a conically coiled spring operatively mounted beneath the heel pad and operative ly connected tothe heel of the shoe, a bore formed at the heel of the shoe for receiving the conical spiral spring, means for affixing the lower coil of the spring within the-bore, said hinge means for the heel pad operatively atfixed to the shank portion of the shoe, and said hinge means comprising a flexible member aflixed to the skived portion of the heel pad at one end and at the opposite end afiixed-to the shank portion of the shoe.

10. As an article of manufacture, an internal cushion heel construction for a shoe comprising a heel pad construction formed with a skived portion at one end and comprising hinge means for the heel pad, a conicallycoiled spring operatively mounted beneath the heel pad for operatively connecting to the heel of a shoe, said hinge means for the heel pad adapted for aflixing to the shank portion of the shoe, and said hinge means comprising a flexible member adapted to be afiixed to the skived portion of the heel pad at one end and at the opposite end adapted to be affixed to the shank portion of the shoe.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 621,384 Swenson Mar. 21, 1899 683,054 Loderer Sept. 24, 1901 897,032 Thompson Aug. 25, 1908 900,920 Foster Oct. 13, 1908 1,184,943 Geiger May 30, 1916 1,269,385 Capata June 11, 1918 1,471,042 Lewis Oct. 16, 1923 1,484,785 Hiss Feb. 26, 1924 1,746,069 Butzen Feb. 4, 1930 1,759,379 Weinberg May 20, 1930 2,157,912 Nabokin May 9, 1939 2,482,333 Everston Sept. 20, 1949 2,696,683 Ciaio Dec. 14, 1954

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US621384 *Mar 15, 1888Mar 21, 1899 Boot or shoe heel
US683054 *Jul 24, 1899Sep 24, 1901Bela LoedererHeel.
US897032 *May 31, 1907Aug 25, 1908William ThompsonShoe-shank support and shoe.
US900920 *Apr 25, 1908Oct 13, 1908James A FosterHeel for boots and shoes.
US1184943 *Feb 25, 1913May 30, 1916Henry Frank GeigerHeel and instep support.
US1269385 *May 16, 1916Jun 11, 1918George CapataShoe.
US1471042 *Jul 18, 1921Oct 16, 1923Lewis Alonzo EResilient heel
US1484785 *May 14, 1923Feb 26, 1924John M HissApparatus for supporting arches
US1746069 *Sep 10, 1927Feb 4, 1930Joseph ButzenAppliance for boots and shoes
US1759379 *Jun 19, 1928May 20, 1930Joseph WeinbergSpring heel
US2157912 *Oct 29, 1937May 9, 1939Jacob NabokinHeel cushion
US2482333 *Aug 4, 1945Sep 20, 1949Everston Joseph HRemovable insert for shoes
US2696683 *Jan 27, 1953Dec 14, 1954Joseph A CiaioShoe with flexible forepart
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3142910 *Nov 18, 1959Aug 4, 1964Beth LevineFootwear with heel-follower
US4461101 *Feb 22, 1983Jul 24, 1984Bush Universal, Inc.Molded shanks
US4709489 *Aug 15, 1985Dec 1, 1987Welter Kenneth FShock absorbing assembly for an athletic shoe
US4894934 *Jan 23, 1989Jan 23, 1990Illustrato Vito JRebound heel device
US7140125 *Oct 20, 2004Nov 28, 2006Angela SingletonHigh-heeled fashion shoe with comfort and performance enhancement features
US20050081401 *Oct 20, 2004Apr 21, 2005Angela SingletonHigh-heeled fashion shoe with comfort and performance enhancement features
US20050138842 *Feb 23, 2005Jun 30, 2005Hayes Riccardo W.Devices and systems for dynamic foot support
US20050138843 *Feb 23, 2005Jun 30, 2005Hayes Riccardo W.Devices and systems for dynamic foot support
US20110225842 *Mar 16, 2010Sep 22, 2011Lu Kuo-MingElastic Heel of The High-Heeled Shoes
EP1463424A1 *Dec 9, 2002Oct 6, 2004Riccardo W. HayesDevices and systems for dynamic foot support
EP1463424A4 *Dec 9, 2002May 25, 2005Riccardo W HayesDevices and systems for dynamic foot support
Classifications
U.S. Classification36/37, 36/76.00R
International ClassificationA43B21/32, A43B21/00
Cooperative ClassificationA43B21/32
European ClassificationA43B21/32