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Publication numberUS2967655 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 10, 1961
Filing dateMay 19, 1958
Priority dateMay 19, 1958
Publication numberUS 2967655 A, US 2967655A, US-A-2967655, US2967655 A, US2967655A
InventorsJr Gaylord E Seger
Original AssigneeMassillon Container Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Polygonal carton
US 2967655 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jan. l0, 1961 G. E. SEGER, JR 2,967,655

PoLYGoNAL CARTON Filed May 19, 1958 IN VEN TOR Gaylaldli Segel: J1.-

ATTORNEYS United States Patent() POLYGONAL CARTON Gaylord E. Seger, Jr., Navarre, Ohio, assignor to Massillon Container Co., Navarre, Ohio, a corporation of Ohio Filed May 19, 1958, Ser. No. 736,367

2 Claims. (Cl. 229-37) This invention relates to polygonal cartons and more particularly it pertains to paperboard cartons having integral end closure flaps that are foldable to flat snugftting surfaces for stable storage of the cartons in stacks.

In recent years cartons for shipping and storage of manufactured articles have been fabricated from single blanks of paperboard or other suitable material. During its fabrication the body of a carton is usually provided with crease or score lines that divide the carton into a number of panels and integral end flaps for subsequent folding into a desired shape.

Many prior paperboard cartons, however, have been objectionable for shipping and storage purposes because among other things the end aps of the final carton have not been properly fabricated to permit their folding in a satisfactory maner, such as in a plane perpendicular to the plane of the panels to which the flaps are attached. The end aps have had a rounded or domed contiguration due to an outwardly bulged distortion and permanent inability to lie flat in snug-fitting relationship with respect to adjacent flaps. As a result, cartons having outwardly bulged end flaps have not been satisfactory for stacking in end-to-end relationship. Accordfngly, there has been a need for apaperboard carton having flat-unbulged end flaps which may be stacked forshipping or storage purposes in an end-to-end manner with other similar cartons.

The carton of the present invention is so constructed that the end flaps are foldable upon each other so that once the bent score lines connecting the aps to the panels of the carton have assumed a permanent set the aps are disposed in a at position perpendicular to the panels and free from outward bulge due to binding action caused by adjacent flaps. The carton is cut and scored so that each end of the carton includes two pairs of oppositely disposed aps, each pair of which is folded in one plane or zone on crease or score lines disposed in the same zone. By providing pairs of overlapping flaps which fold in different zones the flaps do not bulge outwardly to cause an unsteady stacking problem.

In addition to the foregoing, the construction of the present invention includes only fourflaps divided into two pairs which are separately foldable on crease or score lines dividing each flap from an integral panel. Each flap of each pair of oppositely disposed flaps has a length equal to one-half the distance across the eX- panded carton between opposite pairs of panels. When each pair of panels is folded, their adjoining edges meet in abutment and thereby complement each other in maintaining the precise shape of the opened carton. In other words, each pair of flaps when folded meets on a line of abutment halfway between opposite panels on which the aps are mounted. The advantage of such a construction not only provides for the reinforcement of the carton in the open position but also preserves the aps in flat zones.

- Accordingly, it lis an object of this invention to pro- ICC vide a precut and scored carton with end aps integral with the panels forming the body of the carton.

It is another object of this invention to provide a carton having integral end flaps which when folded withthe carton in the opened position provide end closures for the carton which lie in flat planes perpendicular to the sides of the carton.

It is another object of this invention to provide a vpaperboard carton having a polygonal transverse cross section and having two pairs of aps covering at least one open end of each carton with each 'pair of flaps disposed in a separate zone and folded on score lines disposed in their respective zones.

It is another object of this invention to provide a carton for shipping and storage which has end closure tiaps disposed in at planes at right angles to the axis of the carton and conducive to permanent stacking in an end-to-end manner with vertically adjacent similar cartons.

It is another object of this invention to provide a carton for containing a manufactured article and having an octagonal transverse cross section with two pairs of end closure flaps mounted on opposite panels forming the surface of the carton.

Finally, it is an object of this invention to provide a paperboard carton for shipping and storage of manufactured articles which accomplishes the foregoing objects and desiderata in a simple, effective, and inexpensive manner.

These and other objects and advantages apparent to those skilled in the art from the Yfollowing description and claims may be obtained, the stated results achieved and the described diiculties overcome by the discoveries, principles, apparatus, parts, combinations, subcombinations, and elements which comprise the present invention, the nature of which Vis set forth in the following statement, a preferred embodiment of which-illustrative of the best mode in which applicant has contemplated applying the principles-is set forth in the following description, and which is particularly and distinctly pointed out and set forth in the lappended claims forming part hereof.

' Generally, the improved polygonal carton construction of the present inventionV may be stated as including eight side panels divided by foldable creases and adapted for assembly into a tubular body octagonal in transverse section, four alternate side panels having cut ends extending perpendicular to the foldable creases, the other four alternate side panels each having a iiap integral therewith, the aps being associated as inner and outer pairs of flaps, the inner pair of aps being divided from their respective panels by foldable creases aligned with the cut ends of adjacent panels, the foldable creases of said inner flaps being shorter than the Width of the corresponding panel by a distance at each end substantially equal to the thickness of the material constituting the carton, the outer pairs of flaps being divided from their respective panels by foldable creases spaced outwardly from the plane of alignment of said cut ends of the panels by a distance substantially equal to the thickness of -the material constituting the carton, the inner flaps having outer ends abuttable with each other when the carton is in an assembled position in a zone alignable with the cut ends of the panels, the outer aps having ends abuttable with each other when the carton is in an assembled position in a zone adjacent that of the inner flaps, each Hap including an inclined side extending'outwardly from the foldable crease of said flap, the inclined sides of V the inner flaps being abuttable with the inner surfaces of adjacent side panels, and the inclined sides of the outer flaps being abuttable with the cut ends of the adjacen side panels.

vcarton 1 has an octagonal shape.

By way of example, the preferred embodiment of the present invention is illustrated in the accompanying drawing, in which:

' Figure l is a plan view of aprecut Aand scored blank used for an assembled carton; A

Fig. 2 is a perspective view of the upper portion of an assembled carton showing the inner pair of iiaps folded to their assembled position and showing the outer pair offlaps in the unfolded position;

Fig. 3 is a perspective view of the assembled carton showing both pairs of inner and outer iiaps folded to their assembled positions; and

Fig. 4 is a fragmentary vertical sectional view taken on the line `4-:4 of Fig. 3.

Similar numerals refer to similar parts throughout the drawings.

A carton is generally indicated at 1 in an open or nnassembled position in Fig. 1 and in a set-up or assembled position in Fig. 3. The carton 1 has a polygonal transverse cross section in the assembled position with a plurality of panels or sides 2-9, the preferred number of which is eight. For the purpose of the embodiment ofthe invention shown in the drawing, the assembled In addition, the carton is provided with a stitch liap and like the several .panels 2 9, is divided from theadjacent panel 2 by a crease or score line 11 which extends longitudinally of the `assembled carton.

The carton 1 also is provided with a number of end flaps for closing the open ends of the assembled carton.

The flaps include a pair of inner flaps 12 and 13 which are divided from the panels 2 and 6, respectively, by similar score lines 14 extending preferably at right angles to the score lines 11. Likewise, a pair of outer flaps 15 yand 16 are divided from the panels 4 and 8, respectively,

byscore lines 17 which also extend perpendicular to the longitudinal score lines 11. Similar pairs of inner and outer aps 12, 13, 15, and 16 are provided at the other end of the carton 1 as shown in Fig, 1. Thus, each end of the assembled carton is provided with two pairs of aps which when assembled serve to reinforce and main- Vtain the carton in the assembled position and to provide at end walls for the assembled carton.

As shown in Fig. 1, the unassembled or open carton 1 is fabricated from a single, at blank of paperboard or ,other similar material. The blank is precut and scored so that the open carton 1 may subsequently be folded upon the particular score lines 11a and 11b so that the.

`stitched flap 10 overlaps a portion of the panel 9, whereupon the overlapped portions are secured together in a conventional manner such as by stitches or staples 18 as shown in Figs. 2 and 3. For the purpose of stitching, when the blank carton 1 is first folded on the lines 11a and 11b, the pairs of outer aps 15 and 16 which are integral with the panels 4 and 8 are preliminarily scored at 19 in alignment with the score lines 11a and 11b. In addition, during the preliminary cutting of the blank carton 1 the adjacent sides of the flaps 12 and 15 are left uncut for a short segment 20 of the cut line 21 Vextending between said liaps.

Likewise, the aps 13 and 16 are left uncut for a short segment 22 of a cut line 23 that divides said iiaps. The uncut segments 20 and 22 are easily broken when the flaps are later folded. When the blank carton 1 is folded on the score lines 11a and 11b, the aps 15 have overlapping portions which, because of their connection at 20 with the liap 12, fold in the same planewith the flap 12 to facilitate the stitching of the stitch flap 10 to the panel '9. The flaps 16 also have overlapping portions which because of their connection at the uncut segments 22 re- Vmain in the same plane with adjacent flaps 13. Otherwise, without the score lines 19 and uncut portions 20 ,and 22, upon folding the carton 1 on the score lines v11a and 11b, the portions 15a and 16a would extend beyond the score lines 11a and 11b, respectively, and inhibit Vthe stitching operation.

The blank from lwhich the carton 1 is cut also includes a number of cutout portions 24, 25, 26, and 27 at opposite ends of the panels 3, 5, 7, and 9, which portions provide panel ends 28-31, respectively. The cutout portions 24, 25, 26, and 27 are substantially triangular members having sides that include the panel ends 28-31, respectively, and having sides 32-35 inclined at angles preferably 45 to the cut ends 28-31, respectively. The sides 32- 35 have a length equal to the width of the panels 3, 5, 7, and 9 so that when the carton is assembled the sides 32-35 are disposed along the cut ends 28-31, respectively. In addition, the triangular cutout portions 24-27 include sides 36, 37, and 38 which are inclined to the cut ends 28, 29, and 30 at an angle similar to the sides 32-35, namely 45. The inner flap 12 also includes a side 39 similar to the sides i6-38. When the carton 1 is assembled as best shown in Fig. 2, the sides 36-39 extend over portions of the lengths of the cut ends 28-31.

In Fig. l, the crease or score lines 14 for the flaps 12 and 13 are shorter in length than the width of the panels 2 and 6. The cut ends 28, 29 and 30 `extend at one end beyond the score lines 11 for their respective adjacent panels. Thus the Vscore lines 14 are shorter than the width of the panels 2-9 by a spacing 46 for relief foldingnequal to twice the added length of the end cuts 28, 29, and 30. The reason for this configuration is dueto the thickness of the paperboard comprising the carton.

As best shown in Fig. 2, when the inner ap 12 is folded across the open end of'the carton, the side 39 extends over a portion of the cut end 31 ofthe panel 9 and tits in a plane extending across the open end ofthe assembled carton 1. The spacing 40 permits the 4adjacent folded edges of the ap 12 and panels to intertit without bulge or binding, thereby producing a snug tbetween the adjacent folded parts.

In Fig. 1, the panels 4 and 8 are longer than the other panels,because the score lines 17 are out of alignment with the score lines 14 and with the cut ends `28, `29, 30, and 31 by a spacing41 for relief folding which approximates the thickness of the paperboard composingthe carton 1. The'spacings 40 and 41 for relief folding are preferably 1/16. Thus when the outer flaps 15 and 16 are folded into assembled position as shown in Fig. 3, they are folded on the score lines 17 ina plane or zone above that of the inner aps 12 and `13. The inner flaps 12 and 13 are folded in one zone and the outer flaps 15 and 16 are folded in an adjacent `zone so that there ,is no binding which would otherwise occur if the score lines for the outer liaps were in alignment with those of the inneraps.

As shown in Fig. `1, the outer ends of the inner flaps 1,2 and 13 have edges 42 and 43, respectively, which lines are spaced from the `score lines 14 by a distance equal to half the width of the `assembled carton. Thus when the inner aps 12 and 13 (Fig. 2) are folded into position, their edges `42 and43 are in abutment with each other and thereby help to maintain the assembled carton in the desired octagonal shape.

Similarly, the outer flaps 15 and 16 have edges 44 and 45 that are spaced from their Vscore lines 17 by` a dstance equal to one-half the distance across the assembled carton 1. Thus the edges 44 and 45 are out of alignment wth the edges 42 and 43 of the inner liaps by a distance 46 equal to the spacing41 by `which the score lines 17 are out `of alignment with the cut. ends 28 and 31 and 4score lin 14. When theouter flapslare folded into assembled position as shown in Fig. 3, the edges 44 and 45 are in abutment with each other and thereby help to maintain the desired octagonal shape of the carton.

and their score lines is 135, said sides lit snugly against the inner surfaces of the panels 3, 5, 7, and 9, which panels are disposed at 135 to adjacent panels when the carton is in the open or assembled position with the edges 42 and 43 of the inner flaps 12 and 13 in abutment as shown in Fig. 2.

The outer flaps 15 and 16, being folded on creases or score lines 1.7 which are outwardly disposed from the score lines 14 of the inner flaps, are disposed in planes or zones outside of the zone in which the inner llaps are disposed and adjacent thereto. Moreover, in the completely assembled position of Fig. 3, the various sides 32-35 of the outer flaps 16 and 16 are in abutment with the cut ends 28-31-of the adjacent panels. `Similarly, the cut lines 21 and 23, which form sides o-f the -aps 15 and 16 are likewise disposed adjacent opposite panels 2 and 6, as shown fou panel 2 in Fig. 3.

The overlapping inner and outer aps may be secured together in a conventional manner such as by use of glue on adjacent surfaces, by adhesive strip, or by stitching or stapling (not shown), extending along and over the adjoining abutting ends 44 and 45 of the outer aps 15 and 16, respectively.

Accordingly, a precut and scored carton with end naps integral therewith is provided which in the assembled positions is devoid of bulged-out or domed ends customary in prior constructions. The carton 1 is octagonal in transverse cross section, having eight panels of preferably equal width with two inner aps provided on one pair of oppositely disposed panels and with two outer flaps provided on another pair of oppositely disposed panels. In the assembled position the inner flaps are folded on a score line in alignment with the cut ends of the panels and the outer flaps are folded on score lines outwardly disposed from those of the inner flaps so that the outer aps in a zone adjacent to that of the inner ilaps may permanently maintain their zonal position without bulging outwardly due to binding with the inner flaps on other portions of the carton.

Moreover, when each pair of iiaps s folded in the assembled position, they meet on lines of abutment preferably one-half the width of the carton as set up or assembled for use. lThus the flaps with abutting edges combine to reinforce the carton panels in the assembled or set-up position and provide a hat-ended carton that may be stacked in end-to-end manner with similar cartons for storage and shipping purposes.

In the foregoing description certain terms have been used for brevity, clearness and understanding, but no unnecessary limitations are to be implied therefrom beyond the requirements of the prior art, because such words are used for descriptive purposes herein and are intended to be broadly construed.

Moreover, the embodiment of the improved construction illustrated and described herein is by way of example, and the scope of the present invention is not limited to the exact details of construction shown.

Having now described the features, constructions and principles of the invention, the characteristics of the new improved polygonal carton, and the advantageous, new and useful results provided; the new and useful discoveries, principles, parts, elements, combinations, subccmbinay ing perpendicular to the creases, the other of said side panels each having iiaps integral 'with corresponding panels, the liaps including an inner pair and an outer pair of aps, the inner pair of [flaps being divided from their respective panels by foldable creases aligned with the ends of adjacent panels, the fold-able creases of said inner flaps being shorter than the widthrof the corresponding panel by a 'distance at each end substantially equal to the thickness of the material constituting the carton, the outer pair of flaps being divided from their respective panels by foldable creases offset and spaced outwardly from the plane of alignment of said ends of the panels by a distance substantially equal to the thickness of the material constituting the carton, the inner aps having outer ends abuttable with each other when the carton is in an assembled position in a zone alignable with the ends of the panels, and the outer flaps having ends abuttable with each other when the carton is in an assembled position in a zone adjacent that of the inner aps.

2. A carton including eight side panels divided by foldable creases, some of said side panels having ends extending perpendicular to the creases, the other of said side panels each having aps integral with corresponding panels, the aps including an inner pair and an outer pair of ilaps, the inner pair of aps being divided from their respective panels by foldable creases aligned with the ,y

ends of adjacent panels, the foldable creases of said inner ilaps being shorter than the width of the corresponding panel by a distance at each end substantially equal tothe thickness of the material constituting the carton, the outer pair of tlaps being divided from their respective panels by foldable creases offset and spaced outwardly from they plane 'of alignment of said ends of the panels by a distance substantially equal to the thickness of the material constituting the carton, the inner aps having outer ends abuttable with each other when the carton is in Ian assembled position in a zone alignable with the ends of the panels, each flap including an inclined side extendingoutwardly from the foldab-le crease of said flap, the inclined sides of the inner aps being abuttable with the inner surfaces of adjacent side panels, and the inclined sides of the outer ilaps being abuttable with the ends of said adjacent side panels.

References Cited in the le of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS

Patent Citations
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US1425549 *Jun 24, 1921Aug 15, 1922Robert R TaylorPaper-board box
US2517552 *Jul 25, 1946Aug 8, 1950Deering Milliken & Co IncContainer
US2674400 *Jan 3, 1950Apr 6, 1954Behr Manning CorpShipping carton
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4283001 *Nov 9, 1979Aug 11, 1981American Can CompanyTubular carton with polygonal cross-section
US4850527 *Aug 3, 1988Jul 25, 1989Heil-Quaker CorporationCarton with self positioning interlocking corners
US5147271 *Jul 9, 1991Sep 15, 1992OtorMachine for producing polygonal cases
US5697548 *Apr 8, 1996Dec 16, 1997The Mead CorporationTray-style carton having reinforced side walls
US5713469 *Jul 19, 1996Feb 3, 1998The Mead CorporationCarton with integral core
US6106450 *Jun 1, 1998Aug 22, 2000Georgia-Pacific CorporationApparatus and method for set-up of a non-rectangular container from a knocked-down-flat (KDF) precursor
US6598783Feb 9, 2001Jul 29, 2003Tom BrinkmanParcel and object marking and method
US7055734 *Aug 31, 2004Jun 6, 2006The Royal GroupCollapsible carton
US7614992 *Dec 13, 2007Nov 10, 2009Kitaru Innovations Inc.Carton having interconnected flaps
US7806313 *Mar 30, 2007Oct 5, 2010International Paper Co.Shipping and display container and associated container blank
US7935041Aug 25, 2008May 3, 2011Smurfit-Stone Container Enterprises, Inc.Container with inner reinforcement and method and system of manufacturing
US8091768 *May 26, 2009Jan 10, 2012International Paper CompanyBulk shipping container
US8485420 *Nov 17, 2010Jul 16, 2013Rocktenn Cp, LlcBlank, apparatus and method for constructing container
US8720769 *Aug 23, 2010May 13, 2014Packaging Corporation Of AmericaBeverage container
US20110062223 *Aug 23, 2010Mar 17, 2011Packaging Corporation Of AmericaBeverage container
US20120061457 *Sep 12, 2011Mar 15, 2012Orange County Container Group LLCCarton With Angled Corner Panels
US20120205428 *Feb 21, 2012Aug 16, 2012Benjamin StrongBlank and machine for forming a container
EP0570023A2 *Jul 17, 1991Nov 18, 1993OtorContainer formed from sheet material and blank for forming the same
EP0712784A2 *Jul 17, 1991May 22, 1996OtorContainer formed from sheet material and blank for forming same
WO2012177342A1 *May 18, 2012Dec 27, 2012Rock-Tenn Shared Services, LlcReinforcing support assemblies for a container and method of making same
Classifications
U.S. Classification229/109, 229/915, 229/125
International ClassificationB65D5/02
Cooperative ClassificationY10S229/915, B65D5/0227, B65D5/0236
European ClassificationB65D5/02D, B65D5/02C