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Publication numberUS2968053 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 17, 1961
Filing dateMar 14, 1946
Priority dateMar 14, 1946
Publication numberUS 2968053 A, US 2968053A, US-A-2968053, US2968053 A, US2968053A
InventorsBrown Richard L, Finney William J, Gogolick Roland M
Original AssigneeBrown Richard L, Finney William J, Gogolick Roland M
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Buoyancy control
US 2968053 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jan. 17, 1961 R. M. GoGoLIcK ETAI. 2,968,053

BUOYANCY CONTROL Filed March 14, 1946 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 ATTORNEY Jan. 17, 1961 Filed March 14, 1946 FIG. 2..

R. M. GOGOLICK EIAL BUOYANCY CONTROL 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTORS ROLAND M.GOGOLICK WILLIAM J. FINNEY RICHARD L. iBROWN ATTORNEY United States Patent O BUOYAN CY CONTROL Roland M. Gogolick, Arlington, Mass., William J. Finney, Paducah, Ky., and Richard L. Brown, Arlington, Mass., assignors to the United States of America as represented by the Secretary of the Navy Filed Mar. 14, 1946, Ser. No. 654,492

13 Claims. (Cl. 9-8) This invention relates to underwater suspension devices of the gas-operated type and more particularly to a buoyyancy control therefor.

Underwater sound generating devices and the like require for their eliicient operation that they reach their ultimate predetermined operating depth and become established and maintained in a stable equilibrium state at that depth with a minimum of hunting or oscillation. It is toward these ends that the present invention is directed.

It is an object of the present invention to provide a buoyancy control for a gas-operated, underwater suspension device that is quickly and eliiciently operable to bring the device to its pre-set operating depth with a minimum of oscillation or hunting as it seeks said depth and to maintain the device and its suspended object with optimum stability in its equilibrum state.

Another object of the invention is to provide a control of this character that is responsive to velocity variations as well as pressure variations during the approach of the device and its suspended object to the predetermined operating depth.

A further object of the invention is to provide a damping means that cooperates with a venting means of the device in such manner that the control is effected by either ascent or descent of the device as it seeks equilibrium state.

With the above and other objects and features in view, the invention will now be described with reference to the accompanying drawings which illustrate a preferred embodiment of the invention and will be pointed out in the claims.

In the drawings:

Fig. l is a sectional elevation of a gas-operated suspen sion device with the improved control mechanism ernbodied therein, the parts being shown in collapsed condition Within a container in readiness for firing from a signal tube, or the like, of a submerged vessel;

Fig. 2 is a side elevation showing an outer container for the device in the stage of removal therefrom;

Fig. 3 is a side elevation of the device completely removed from the container, the half sections of an inner container being shown falling away;

Fig. 4 is a perspective of the suspension device in operating condition, the damping vane or umbrella having expanded to operative position;

Fig. 5 is a detailed elevation, partly in section, of a release valve employed in the device for venting gas from the buoyancy chamber or enclosure, a portion of the damping vane being shown attached thereto; and

Fig. 6 is a detailed perspective of a section of the damping vane frame illustrating the hinge-type mounting for the ribs and the locking feature thereof.

Referring to Figs. 3 and 4 the suspension device comprises generally, a balloon or enclosure 10 having secured in its upper end a venting or release valve 12 to which is fastened an umbrella or damping vane 14. The object suspended by the device is herein shown as an 2,968,053 Patented Jan. 17, 1961 ICC underwater sound generator 16, or what is otherwise known as an underwater noisemaker. The sound generator is preferably secured to the enclosure 10 by a tightly coiled spring secured at one end to the generator and at its opposite end to a fitting 20 attached to the lower end of the enclosure 10. The enclosure is preferably made of pliant material such as neoprene-impregnated nylon and is provided at its lower end with a series of apertures 22 for a purpose to be later described.

The valve 12 (Fig. 5) comprises a cylindrical body section 28 externally threaded at 30 for securing the section within a fitting 24 (Fig. l) fastened as at 26 to the upper end of enclosure 10. Within a bore 32 of the section 28 there is mounted a Sylphon bellows 34. The lower end of the bellows rests upon an adjusting screw 36 threaded in the base of the section 28. The upper end of the bellows has conected thereto by an upstanding stern 38 a beveled valve disc 40. Disc 40 is arranged to cooperate with a correspondingly beveled valve seat 42 formed in the end of a sleeve 43 telescopically mounted over the upper portion of the body section 28. A bonnet 44 threaded over an enlarged portion 46 of the body section 28 aligns and secures the seat member 42 in position for slight movement axially of the body section 28. The base of section 28 has provided therein an inlet aperture 48 for permitting the entrance of escaping gas therethrough into the bore 32.

A depending cylindrical tube 52 is fitted securely over a reduced portion o-f the lower end of the section 28 and has a line mesh wire screen 54 within the lower por tion to provide a lter for preventing passage of substances with the escaping gas. against a flange provided on the lower end of the valve seat 42, the upper surface of the: enlarged portion 46, and the undersurface of the bonnet 44 provide means for holding the valve seat 42 in its normal position shown in Fig. 5, i.e., centrally of the clearance space provided between the internal upper surface: of the bonnet 44 and the upper surface of the enlarged portion 46.

The upper end of the sleeve 43 is provided externally with a pair of spaced annular grooves 58 for receiving a pair of spring retainer rings 60 that oppositely embrace and secure a circular frame 62 of the damping vane 14. The vane 14 comprises a plurality of radially extending ribs 64 (Figs. 5 and 6) pivotally mounted on a wire ring 66 passing through spaced, projecting studs 68 secured in a beveled portion of the frame 62. A coil spring 70, there being one spring for each ribl 64, encircles the ring 66 between one of the studs 68 and the pivot end of its corresponding rib 64 and normally tends to urge the rib toward the next adjacent stud 68. When, however, the ribs are in collapsed position as shown in Fig. 1, their inner ends 72 project into corresponding apertures 74 provided in the beveled portion of the frame 62 as shown in dotted lines in Fig. 6, and thus hold the springs 70 compressed. Upon the ribs swinging outwardly from the position shown in Fig. 1 to the position shown in Fig. 4, their inner ends 72 are swung out of the confines of the openings 74, whereupon, their respective springs 70 force the ribs laterally along the ring 66 against the next adjacent stud 68. In this position the ribs are securely locked against vertical movement in either direction since their ends 72 are held liat against the beveled portion of frame 62 and out of alignment with apertures 74. In this manner the fabric covering that is fastened to the ribs is securely held in its operative outstretched position as clearly shown in Fig. 4.

The gas generating source herein shown comprises a stick 76 of chemical substance such as calcium hydrido (CaH2) which upon contact with water generates hydrogen. It will be understood, however, that any chemical suitable for generating a gas may be used. The stick may Ring springs 56 bearing be secured for retention in the bottom of the enclosure by any suitable means such as the cord fastenings 78 shown in Fig. 4. If desired, pulverized calcium hydride may be substituted for the stick or used as an adjunct thereto. In this latter event, the powder is merely placed loosely within the enclosure. In order to prevent crystals or particles which may become loosened from the stick from entering and fouling the operation of the valve 12, a stopper or plug 80 of a diameter that lits snugly within the lower end of the tube 52 is inserted therein. This plug 80 is connected by a cord 82 to the fitting 20. The cord 82 is of sufficient length to permit insertion of the plug within the tube when the enclosure is in collapsed state within a container now to be described, but is insuiciently long to permit the plug 80 to remain within the tube 52 when the enclosure is in distended or operative position as shown in Fig. 4.

The container for the device includes a cylindrical tube 84 (Figs. 1, 2 and 3) that is closed at its upper end and open at its bottom end. It also includes two half-shells 86 arranged to be fitted together and slid into the tube 84, the half-shells being somewhat shorter in length than the over-all length of tube 84. In assembling the device within the container, the enclosure 10 is collapsed, the ribs 64 of the vane 14 are folded downwardly about the enclosure, the plug 80 is inserted in the tube 52, and the half-shells 86 placed therearound. Before inserting this assembly within the tube 84, a plunger disc generally indicated at 88 is first rammed into the tube into close proximity with the closed end thereof.

The disc 88 has a suitable packing washer 89 projecting externally therefrom for tightly engaging the internal surface of the tube 84 and effecting a gas-tight chamber 90 between the upper end of the tube and the plunger. The plunger is provided with a relatively large internal recess 92 in which is placed a charge of powder 94 preferably of the smokeless type, the powder being sealed in the recess by a disc 95 cemented in place over the recess. A heat transfer cup 96 is secured in the base of plunger 88 and extends upwardly into the powder charge 94. A fuse 98 of the quickmatch type is connected at its upper end to the cup 96 and extends downwardly along the internal wall of the container through a flexible tube 100 preferably made of varnish-impregnated fiber glass, or other suitable heat resistant material. Following the insertion of the plunger 88 and its fuse connection, the assembled half-shells and the parts embraced thereby are forced into the tube as clearly shown in Fig. l.

Next, a cylindrical base plug 102 having an external groove in which is mounted a water-seal ring 104 is forced into the lower end of the container to elfect a watertight seal of the enclosed assembly. The lower end of the tube is then crimped as at 106 into an external groove formed inthe lower portion of the plug 102. The plug 102 is internally threaded to receive an upstanding threaded end of a coupling (not shown) rigidly secured to the uppermost section of the sound generator 16 that is to be supported by the suspension device. One end of the connecting spring 18 is secured to the plug 102 by a screw 108 and the opposite end of this spring is connected as at 110 to the fitting 20 that is secured at the lower end of the enclosure 10. In assembling the parts, as just described, the spring 18 is coiled flat within a recess 112 provided in the upper surface of the plug 102.

The entire assembly above described may be lired from a conventional signaling tube of the type generally found on underwater vessels and the firing gear or triggering mechanism used. to initiate its ejection may be of any well known conventional construction. Suffice it to say here, that upon ejection of the device from the tube, the fuse 98 is ignited and, in turn, ignites the cap 96 and through it, the powder charge 94. Explosion of the charge 94 develops a sufficient pressure of gas within the chamber 90 to cause the tube 84 to be blown off of the assembly in the manner progressively illustrated in Figs.

2 and 3. As soon as the tube 84 is blown completely free of the half-shells 86, the latter fall away as shown in Fig. 3. If desired, a leaf spring 87 (Fig. 1) may be inserted between the half-shells during assembly to assure rapid release of the shells as soon as the tube 84 is removed.

Upon water entering through the apertures 22 it reacts with a hydride stick 76 and immediately fills the enclosure 10 with hydrogen thus rendering it positively buoyant. At the same time, the weight of the sound generator pulls downwardly upon the bottom of the enclosure, insuring that it turns topside up, and stretches the tightcoiled suspension spring to the desired operating length. Being positively buoyant, the suspension device rises. As it approaches the pre-set operating depth to which it has been adjusted by the setting of the screw 36 with respect to the Sylphon bellows 34, the valve 40 releases hydrogen until the operating position and neutral buoyancy are reached.

Hydrogen is generated continuously at a slow rate by the stick 76, and is released through the valve 12 at a rate which is just fast enough to maintain the device in a stable equilibrium state at the predetermined operating depth. If the device rises above its pre-set operating depth, the excess gas is released and the device immediately descends to its equilibrium position. With the velocity type of control provided by the damping vane 14, the valve opens when the device rises and the opening is proportional to the velocity. Thus as the device is rising due to excess positive buoyancy, the valve is open.

With only a velocity component of control, marked oscillations of the device are occasioned by overshooting of the device at the mean extremities of its range of travel while it seeks a stable equilibrium state. This is due to inertia. Hence, the device can drift very slowly up or down to any depth. By the inclusion of the pressure-operated component of the control including the bellows 34, this drift is avoided. Depending upon their relative sensitivities, the pressure component can be considered as a correction to keep the slow drift to zero, or the velocity component can be considered a correction to keep the hunting to a minimum. Appropriate sensitivity ranges for these velocity and pressure components exist which reduce both drift and oscillations to a minimum and thereby impart an optimum of stable equilibrium to the device.

It is noted that the vane 14 when in outstretched, operative position is elective to render a damping action and control the valve, either upon ascent or descent of the device and thus serves the double purpose of damping vertical motion of the device in either direction and actuating the velocity component of the valve action.

Having described the invention what is claimed as novel and desired to be protected by Letters Patent of the United States is:

What is claimed is:

1. In a buoyancy control for an underwater suspension device comprising, a supporting enclosure having gas generating means therein, a valve in said enclosure including opposed disc and seat sections cooperatively operable for regulating the flow of gas therefrom, pressure responsive means secured to said disc section, and velocity responsive means secured to said seat section, said pressure and velocity responsive means thereby being effective to regulate the opening of said valve couformably to the rate of ascent or descent of said enclosure as it seeks a stable equilibrium state.

2. In combination with an underwater suspension device iucluding an enclosure having gas generating means therein, a buoyancy control comprising a valve in said enclosure having cooperatively operable disc and seat sections, Sylphon means secured to said disc section for controlling said valve by pressure, umbrella damping means secured to said seat for controlling said valve by velocity, said controlling means being constructed and arranged to respond mutually to variations in pressure and velocity occasioned by the ascent or descent of the device as it seeks its pre-set operating depth.

3. In a buoyancy control for an underwater suspension device including a supporting enclosure having gas generating means therein, a valve in said enclosure including first and second opposed cooperating elements for regulating the iiow of gas therefrom, pressure responsive means secured to said first element of said valve being operable to vent said enclosure at a varying rate, and damping means secured to said second element of said valve operable to control the venting rate conformably to the rate of ascent or descent of said enclosure as it seeks a stable equilibrium state.

4. In a buoyancy control for an underwater suspension device comprising, a supporting enclosure having gas generating means therein, a valve in said enclosure including first and second opposed sections cooperatively operable for regulating the ow of gas therefrom, pressure responsive means secured to said irst element, velocity responsive means secured to said second element, said pressure and velocity responsive means being cooperatively operable to control the position of said opposed sections relative to each other in anticipation of the requirements of the gasvolume maintenance or release necessary to establish a stable equilibrium state at a predetermined depth.

5. A submarine suspension device comprising, an enclosure, gas generating means Within said enclosure, means for establishing said enclosure at a predetermined depth including a valve communicating with said enclosure for venting said gas, said valve including opposed disc and seat sections, a pressure operated Sylphon secured to said disc section and a vane secured to said seat section, said Sylphon and said vane thereby controlling the opening and closing of said valve in response to variations in pressure and velocity of travel.

6. In a buoyancy control for an underwater suspension device comprising, a supporting enclosure having gas generating means therein, a valve in said enclosure having opposed disc and seat sections cooperatively operable for regulating the iiow of gas therefrom, pressure responsive means secured to said disc section, velocity responsive means secured to said seat section, said pressure and velocity responsive means thereby being eiective to regulate the opening of said valve conformably to the rate of ascent or descent of said enclosure as it seeks a stable equilibrium state, and means for presetting said pressure responsive means to determine the depth at which said enclosure is in equilibrium.

7. In combination with an underwater suspension device including an enclosure having gas generating means therein, buoyancy control means in said enclosure cornprising, a cylindrical member having one end open and communicating with said enclosure and the other end having a valve seat therein, a pressure-responsive Sylphon disposed within said cylindrical member, a valve disc disposed in opposed relationship to said seat and secured to said Sylphon, and umbrella damping means secured to the exterior of said cylindrical member for controlling said valve in response to the velocity of movement of said enclosure, said Sylphon and said damping means thereby controlling the opening and closing of said valve in response mutually to variations in pressure and velocity of travel.

8. In an underwater suspension device including an enclosure having gas generating means therein, a valve ia said enclosure ineludii", opposed cooperating elements for regulating the ilow of gas therefrom, means Secured to one of the elements of said valve for venting said enclosure at a varying rate dependent on the depth of said device, and means secured to the other element of said valveiand responsive to the rate of ascent or descent of said enclosure for controlling the venting rate.

9. In an underwater suspension device including an enclosure having gas generating means therein, a valve in said enclosure including opposed cooperating sections for regulating the ow of gas therefrom, pressure responsive means secured to one of said sections and velocity responsive means secured to the other of said sections, l pressure and velocity responsive means of said valve eratively operable to control the opening of said valve conformably to the rate of ascent or descent of said enclosure.

l0. An underwater suspension device comprising, an enclosure, gas generating means within said enclosure, a valve in said enclosure including opposed disc and seat sections, pressure responsive means secured to said disc section, and velocity responsive means secured to said seat section, said pressure and velocity responsive means being cooperatively operable to control the flow of gas from said valve in response to variations in pressure and velocity of travel.

1l. An underwater suspension device comprising, an enclosure, gas generating means Within said enclosure, a valve in said enclosure including opposed disc and seat sections, pressure responsive means secured to said disc section, velocity responsive means secured `to said seat section, said pressure and velocity responsive means being cooperatively operable to control the flow of gas from said valve in response to variations in pressure and velocity of travel, and means for pre-setting said pressureresponsive device to determine the depth in the water at which said enclosure is maintained in equilibrium.

12. An underwater suspension device comprising, an enclosure having gas generating means therein, a valve in said enclosure including opposed cooperating sections for regulating the liow of gas therefrom, pressure responsive means secured to one of said sections and a normally collapsed vane secured to the other of said sections, said vane when moved into operative position being operative cooperatively with said pressure responsive means for controlling the opening of said valve in response to changes in depth of said enclosure and the velocity of travel thereof in either ascending or descending direction.

13. Apparatus in accordance with claim 12 including means for pre-setting said pressure responsive means to determine the depth at which said enclosure is maintained in position.

References Cited in the tile of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 952,450 Leon Mar. 22, 1910 1,379,273 Meden May 24, 1921 1,440,596 Hammond Ian. 2, 1923 FOREIGN PATENTS 127,680 Great Britain June 12, 1919

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US952450 *Apr 16, 1907Mar 22, 1910Roehss & CarlanderSubmarine mine, torpedo, and the like.
US1379273 *Aug 17, 1917May 24, 1921American Gas Accumulator CompaDevice for causing submersible bodies to rise or sink
US1440596 *Sep 30, 1915Jan 2, 1923Hammond Jr John HaysSubmarine mine
GB127680A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3098441 *Sep 23, 1959Jul 23, 1963Amundson Thomas MWeapon recovery system
US3226670 *Aug 24, 1962Dec 28, 1965Richard Joseph DApparatus for determining characteristics of the ocean bottom
US3229292 *Mar 6, 1962Jan 11, 1966Dell Aria Paul SSnorkel simulator
US3447627 *Sep 29, 1967Jun 3, 1969Us NavyUnderwater sound reflector apparatus
US4497632 *Apr 6, 1983Feb 5, 1985Rocket Research CompanyInflatable buoy
US4596085 *Jul 3, 1984Jun 24, 1986Cotillier James CFish finding probe
US4649744 *May 16, 1984Mar 17, 1987Jim CotillierFish locator probe
Classifications
U.S. Classification441/22, 367/4, 441/30, 116/27, 102/414
International ClassificationB63B22/00, F42B22/08, F42B22/00
Cooperative ClassificationF42B22/08, B63B22/003
European ClassificationF42B22/08, B63B22/00L