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Publication numberUS2969145 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 24, 1961
Filing dateMay 7, 1956
Priority dateMay 7, 1956
Publication numberUS 2969145 A, US 2969145A, US-A-2969145, US2969145 A, US2969145A
InventorsHannauer Jr George
Original AssigneeJohnson & Johnson
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Packaged adhesive bandage
US 2969145 A
Images(2)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jan. 24, 1961 G. HANNAUER, JR

PACKAGED ADHESIVE BANDAGE 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed May 7, 1956 INVENTOR. GEORGE HANNAUER, JR.

ATTORNEY Jan. 24, 1961 G. HANNAUER, JR 2,969,145

PACKAGED ADHESIVE BANDAGE Filed May 7, 1956 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 IN VEN TOR.

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ATTORNEY GEORGE HANNAUER, JR.

United States Patent PACKAGED ADHESIVE BANDAGE George Hannaner, Jr., La Grange, Ill., assignor, by mesnc assignments, to Johnson & Johnson, New Brunswick,

Filed May 7, 1956, Ser. No. 583,273

12 laims. (Cl. 206-632) This invention relates to adhesive bandages, particularly packaged, sterilized adhesive bandages of the type known as finger bandages, which are ready to apply and normally comprise a pad dressing and. an adhesive backing strip. The invention has as an important object the production of a package for such bandages which permits improved handling case when preparing to apply the bandage to a finger or other portion of the body.

Present commercial forms of finger bandages comprise a backing material of fabric or plastic bearing a layer of pressure-sensitive adhesive material. A gauze or other absorbent pad is affixed to a central portion of this adhesive surface leaving the adhesive surfaces at the ends of the bandage for adherent application to the skin. In order to package the bandage flat in individual paper envelopes, these end adhesive surfaces are temporarily covered with removable facing sheets having overlapping inner ends which cover the absorbent pad and provide pull tabs for removing the facing sheets preparatory to using the bandage. In some instances a polymeric elastic film backing is used, which is relatively unstretched but easily stretchable and has an elastic character that makes it almost like a second skin. Such elastic plastic films have a low modulus (within the range of 1000 to 2400 pounds per square inch of cross sectional area) at 100% elongation.

Adhesive bandages of the type described are required by law to be dispensed and sold in a sterile package, and

' this is commonly accomplished by placing the bandage in a paper envelope which is then sealed all around and subjected to a suitable sterilizing process. In has been found, however, that it is often quite diflicult to remove the bandage from the sealed envelope, particularly at a time of emergency or when it is necessary to apply the bandage in as short a time as possible. It is accordingly a primary object of the present invention to provide a packaged sterile finger bandage in which the bandage may be quickly and easily removed from the package or envelope in which it is kept in a sterile state prior to use.

It is a further object of the invention to provide a packaged sterilized adhesive bandage which contains fewer parts than conventional packaged bandages of the type described, and is therefore less costly to manufacture and at the same time simpler to manipulate preparatory to use.

A still further object of the invention is to provide a packaged adhesive bandage in which the usual facing strips are omitted, and the packaging material serves not only as protection for the adhesive coated ends of the bandage, but also as a sealed covering for the entire bandage.

Packaged finger bandages have been made in which the surrounding package or envelope serves also as a temporary medium for protecting the adhesive coated ends of the bandage. Such products, however, do not have the same arrangement as the packaged bandages of the present invention, and have the disadvantage that they ice cannot be adequately sealed for long-lasting sterility. Moreover, the packaged bandages of the present invention contain fewer components and are more economical to make on a commercial scale.

It is accordingly a still further object of the invention to provide an adhesive bandage of the type described contained in a package which is not only readily removable with minimum handling, but is capable of maintaining the bandage in a hermetically sealed and thoroughly sterile state until such removal.

A still further object is to manufacture packaged adhesive bandages in smaller than normal packages, whereby additional saving in packaging cost is achieved without reducing the size of the bandage itself.

Further objects and advantages of the invention will become apparent from the following description and accompanying drawings, in which like reference numerals denote corresponding parts and in which Figure l is a plan view of a typical packaged bandage of this invention prior to opening the same; Figure 2 is an isometric view of the package or envelope shown in Figure 1 with one side or panel pulled partly away from the other to expose the absorbent pad; Figure 3 is an isometric view of the package with the panels separated somewhat more than in Figure 2 to expose not only the pad, but also a portion of each adhesive coated end strip; Figure 4 is an isometric view of the bandage still attached to one panel of the envelope but with the other panel completely separated; Figure 5 is a longitudinal cross sectional view on the line 5-5 of Figure 1; Figures 6 to 10 are longitudinal sectional views of modified forms of the invention shown in Figures 1 to 5; and Figure 11 is asectional view of the package shown in Figure 10, but showing. one panel almost entirely separated from the other panel. As shown in the drawings the various parts are somewhat thickened for the sake of clarity.

The adhesive bandages which are packaged in accordance with the present invention generally comprise a backing layer or strip of suitable material such as fabric or plastic film, which is coated on one side with a tacky adhesive material and has a gauze pad or other absorbent pad dressing positioned on the adhesive coated surface. The pad is usually centrally located on the backing, but may be placed somewhat ofl? center or even near one end, if. desired. The adhesive used in such bandages usually comprises a mixture of natural and synthetic rubber in varying proportions, and also resin or other suitable tackifier. Various formulations are used depending on Whether the material is to be applied by calendering or by a solvent process. Examples of such formulations may be found, for example, in Patent Nos. 2,358,761 and 2,703,083, or a suitable adhesive composition such as the following may be used:

Parts by weight Rubber (latex crepe) 350 Butadiene-styrene copolymer Glycerol ester of hydrogenated abietic acid 100 Pentaerythritol ester of heat Such adhesives are in general sufiiciently tacky to stick firmly to the skin, yet permit easy removal of the applied bandage. When a plastic film is used as the; backing, the

adhesives described in Patent No. 2,734,503 are preferred, and in such case it is frequently desirable also to use a primer coating such as described therein.

The bandages of the type hereinbefore described are in general packaged according to this invention by placing each of them in folded condition between two sheets of suitable packaging material, such as coated paper, plastic film, coated plastic film, or paper-film laminates. The packaging material employed for this purpose should be of such a nature that it will adhere removably to the surface of the adhesive mass which it contacts. Preferably the adherence between the contacting surfaces should be sufficiently light to permit the sheets of packaging material to be peeled off substantially without rupturing or breaking and without leaving a deposit on the adhesive mass or otherwise contaminating it. Suitable coated papers for this purpose include, among others, papers coated with resin or plastic material, such as for example, a latexsaturated paper coated with a polyvinyl chloride polymer plasticized with non-migratory plasticizers, a 60 lb. bleached sulfite envelope stock coated with a nitrocellulose lacquer, a 25 lb. long fiber super-calendered and washed rope stock coated with a plasticized cellulose acetate-butyrate lacquer, and a super calendered glassine coated with a nitrocellulose lacquer.

Suitable plastic films for this purpose include cast or extruded polyethylene, an extruded high viscosity unplasticized polyvinyl chloride commercially known as Luvitherm, a rubber hydrohalide commercially known as Pliofilm, a vinylidine halide polymer film commercially known as Saran, a highly acetylated cellulose ester commercially known as Kodapak IV and other similar films which may be either transparent or opaque.

Suitable coated films include cellophane coated with a vinylidine chloride-acrylonitrile copolymer, and the like. As laminates I may use a combination of aluminum foil and polyethylene, cellophane and polyethylene, or cellophane and Saran, or I may use cellulose acetate film laminated to a washed kraft coffee bag paper stock, or polyethylene laminated to a 25 lb. bleached sulfite label stock, or the like.

Prior to covering the adhesive bandages with packaging material of the type described above, in the preferred forms of the package the bandage is first folded at least once in such a manner that the adhesive-coated ends, or portions of the adhesive-coated ends, face in opposite directions. When properly folded in this manner and then compressed, portions of the adhesive coated surface of the backing face outwardly in one direction, other portions of the adhesive coated surface face outwardly in the opposite direction, while certain areas of the uncoated side of the backing lie contiguous. The folded bandage is then placed between sheets or panels of suitable paper or film of the type described in such a manner that the oppositely facing surfaces of the adhesive ends contact and adhere to the inner surfaces of different opposing panels, after which the assembled parts are ready for sealing. The panels are usually rectangular in outline to conform generally with the outline or shape of the folded bandage, but may be of any desired shape conforming generally with the shape of the folded bandage. They are made slightly larger in area than the folded bandage, 110W? ever, so that their edges will project beyond all sides and ends of the bandage to allow room for sealing.

The assembled parts are finally formed into a finished package by sealing the package material in any suitable manner along lines surrounding the bandage so that the panels may later be separated. In the event the panel walls are made of heat-scalable material or are coated with heat-sealable material, it is not necessary to apply any special sealing material along the peripheral edges or other line to be sealed. While in general it is preferable to employ panel material which is heat-scalable or which has been coated over its entire surface with heatsealable material, if desired, a specially prepared sealing material, or an adhesive, such as glue, hydrolyzed starch or rubber latex, can be separately applied, in which case it is applied only along the lines where the scaling is to take place. When the panel walls are made of solventsealable material, it is only necessary to apply suitable solvent along the edges or other sealing line of the panels, after which the panels are sealed. In the event a pressure-seal coating is employed, it should be applied only along the panel edges or sealing lines, as such material tends to adhere too strongly to the adhesive mass on the bandage, when applied elsewhere on the panel surfaces.

When thermoplastic sheets are employed to make the envelopes of this invention, the panels of the envelope can be superficially sealed by applying pressure along the sealing lines of the panels at a temperature just below the temperature normally causing cohesion and permanent union. Such superficial seals can also be obtained by subjecting the films to the action of a high-frequency electric field. Suitable machines and methods for this purpose are described, for example, in Patents Nos. 2,525,355; 2,539,375; 2,691,613. In each instance, of course, the sealing operation must be carried out with care so as to insure a bacteria impervious seal.

At one end, usually near the folded end or one of the folded ends of the bandage, the seal between the panels of the envelope is made along a transverse line slightly spaced from the end of each sheet, and the extended portion or free end of each sheet, thereby forms a tab which may be readily grasped for opening the package. If desired, the free end of each sheet or panel thereby formed may be folded back on itself and preferably sealed in contacting relationship to provided a double thickness of paper in the tab, as shown, for example, in Figure 7. Also, one or both of these ends or tabs may be folded back on itself again to permit still easier grasping, when it is desired to break the seal and open the envelope to obtain the bandage contained therein. More over, the two panels may be integrally connected at the end opposite the tabs, folded transversely at that end to put them in superimposed relation, and then sealed along their remaining edges. However, in general it is preferable to employ separate panels and seal their entire peripheral edges.

The operation of breaking the seal and removing the envelope from around the bandage is extremely simple. One tab is held between the thumb and first finger of the left hand, while the other tab is held and pulled by the thumb and first finger of the right hand. The pulling motion is made in opposite directions longitudinally of the envelope, which causes the panels to separate from the bandage and from each other by means of a peeling action.

Referring to the specific form of package or envelope shown in Figures 1 to 5, the numeral 10 represents generally a finger bandage of the type now commonly in use. Such bandages comprise a backing 12 ofsuitable fabric or plastic film. The backing 12 has its entire surface on one side coated with a suitable adhesive to provide a tacky pressure-sensitive surface and has a pad of gauze or other absorbent dressing material 14- placed centrally thereon. The resulting composite bandage 19 is kept in a'sealed envelope, generally designated as 16, which is rectangular in shape to conform with the shape of the folded bandage and consists of two halves or panels 18 and 20. The envelope 16 is made of coated paper or film which has been treated on one side with a sealing material of the type hereinbefore described. The panels 18 and 29 of the envelope 16 are sealed together at the time of forming the package, with the seal coated sides facing each other, and with one end portion of each panel projecting beyond the seal to provide pull tabs 22 and 24. At the same time one or both of these projecting end portions of the panels is folded back reversely as shown in Figure 5, so that they may be readily grasped upon opening the package.

As shown in Figures 2, 3 and 4, the parts of the envelope are separated by grasping one of the tabs 22 and 24 in each hand and pulling in opposite directions longitudinally of the envelope. Customarily, and with proper manipulation, one of the panels is completely removed, leaving the bandage hanging from the other panel. Thus, after panel 20 has been separated entirely, the adhesive coated end 26 of the bandage still adheres in part to panel 18 of the envelope, as shown in Figure 4. To apply the bandage to a finger, the free end 28 of the bandage is first grasped with the other hand, after which the bandage is entirely removed from panel 18 and is thereupon applied in the usual manner.

In Figures 2 to 5 the end strip 26 is shown folded under pad 14 and the central portion of the backing 12, While the end strip 28 normally extends longitudinally parallel to the pad, as for example when the package lies in a flat position prior to use. This arrangement allows panel 18 to contact end strip 26 and panel 20 to contact end strip 28, with the result that when tabs 22 and 24 are pulled, the pulling force breaks open the seals along the panel edges and also separates the panels from the adhesive ends of the bandage. In pulling the panels apart gently as shown in Figures 2 to 4, panel 243 and end strip 28 separate first, while only a portion of, the folded end strip 26 is separated from panel 18. In some instances however, end 26 of the bandage will separate first, leaving the bandage adhering at end 28 to panel 20. In either case, the free end of the bandage is grasped by the hand which pulled the panel first to separate, and then pulled to separate the bandage completely from the remaining panel, after which the bandage is applied to the'desired portion of the skin.

In Figures 6, 7, 8 and 9 are shown variations of the package displayed in Figures 1 to 5. In each instance at least a portion of one of the adhesive-coated end strips on the bandage is folded under so that it contacts one panel, while at least a portion of the other end strip contacts the second panel. It is accordingly possible in each case, as it was in the form of package shown in Figures 1 to 5, to pull the tabs 22 and 24 in opposite direction, thereby removing one of the panels entirely, While the bandage remains adhered to the other panel, after which the bandage is completely separated from the second panel and applied.

Referring more specifically to each of Figures 6 to 9, in Figure 6 the arrangement is somewhat similar to that shown in Figure 5, but differs in that only about onethird of the end strip 26 is folded under. In Figure 7 the bandage is shown folded centrally across pad 14 forming a transverse fold line at the right. The adhesive coated ends 26 and 28 of the bandage are also folded adjacent their lines of contact with pad 14, so that they extend to the right beyond pad 14 with their adhesive coated surfaces facing in opposite directions and contacting panels 18 and 20. The tabs 22 and 24 in Figure 7 are formed with a double thickness by making them extra long and folding back and pressing portions 30 and 32 against the remainder of the tabs.

In Figure 8, the pad 14 is shown folded centrally as in Figure 7, but with the fold line at the left, while the end strips 26 and 28 extend to the right beyond the pad with their adhesive coated surfaces contacting panels 18 and 20. In Figure 9 about one-half of each end strip is folded under so that a portion of each adhesive-coated surface faces upwardly, while other portions face downwardly and an effect is obtained similar to that achieved in the other variations.

Figure shows a form of package which is different in certain respects from the packages shown in Figures 1 to 9, but nevertheless can be operated or used in a similar manner. Thus, the bandage in Figure 10 is shown with both end strips 26 and 28 folded under, end 28 being folded under first, after which end 26 is folded. With this arrangement only end 26 contacts the envelope, while the adhesive surface of end 28 faces the back side of end 26. In order to avoid undesirable sticking of end 28 to the back side of end 26, a piece or strip 34 of crinoline, plastic film or other suitable material is inserted between ends 26 and 28.

Upon separating panels 18 and 20 of the envelope 7 shown in Figure 10 in the manner hereinbefore described,

panel 20 separates first, since it is not in contact with an adhesive coated surface on the bandage. The projecting end or edge 36 of crinoline insert 34 can then be grasped by one hand, and the bandage can be completely sep arated by simultaneously pulling tab 36 and tab 22 on panel 18. Although this requires an extra motion as compared with the packages of Figures 1 to 9, the operation of removing the envelope and applying the bandage is otherwise the same.

It will be noted that the bandages vary in total length depending upon the manner in which they are folded. Thus, the longest package is shown in. Figure 6, while packages of intermediate length are shown in Figures 5. 8 and 9. The packages shown in Figures 7 and 10 are the shortest and are about one-third the length of adhesive bandages as commonly packaged at the present time.

The pad dressings used in the manufacture of the bandages may be of any conventional type of material capable of withstanding sterilization temperatures. They may be absorbent, woven or non-woven, fibrous or non-fibrous; and may be made from such diverse materials as cotton or synthetic fiber gauzes; felts of cotton, Wool, and syn thetic fibers; sponges, such as rubber and synthetic polymer sponges, and alginic sponges, felts, and fibrous pads.

The bandages which are packaged in accordance with this invention may be made andassembled in various ways. Conventional procedures are used in making clothbacked bandages. In the case of plastic-backed bandages the following general procedure may, for example, be employed:

The plastic film forming material is spread either in the form of a solution, a plastisol, an organosol or a latex on to a heavy super-calendered paper of the type generally used for preparing cast films. The film is then dried and fused (if necessary) while adherent to the paper. If a primer anchor-coat is desired, the film is run through a reverse roll spreader where a thin coating of a suitable primer is applied. The primer is dried either by passage through a short oven or by other conventional means. An adhesive, as previously described, is then applied to the backing in proper thickness by a suitable knife or reverse roll spreader. The combination then passes through an oven wherein the adhesive is dried. Upon emerging from this oven, the tape and the adherent paper are slit, as a unit, into the desired widths. The previously slit tape is then fed into an automatic machine along with strips of the panel, material, and material for the absorbent pads. In this machine, vent holes are formed in the adhesive tape, the pads are spotted over these holes, and the paper carrier is removed and discarded. The tape is then cut into individual bandages which are folded so that the envelope panels can be placed around them. During the final operations of the automatic machine, the envelope panels are cut, placed around the bandages, and sealed around their peripheries after which the extending end tabs are folded back. The packaged bandages are then ready to be sterilized. The finished packages containing the bandages sealed therein are usually sterilized at temperatures of F. orhigher. When chemical sterilization is employed, temperatures of to F. are suificient. When steam sterilization is employed, higher temperatures such as 235 to 250F. are required.- In either case, the packages made as herein described are not harmed, and are ready flor quick opening and application of the bandages to the s in.

Although reference has been made herein primarily to bandages of the type known as finger bandages, the package of this invention may be readily adapted to other forms of adhesive bandages or even to sterilized adhesive strips without a pad.

I claim:

1. A packaged adhesive bandage comprising an adhesive bandage and an envelope enclosing the same, said adhesive bandage consisting of a backing having a coating of tacky adhesive material applied on one side thereof and an absorbent dressing pad medially positioned on said adhesive surface and leaving said adhesive surface uncovered at each end of said backing, said envelope comprising a pair of opposing panels having smooth inner faces sealed together completely around and outside the edges of said bandage and provided with pull tabs at adjacent end portions, said bandage being folded transversely across the center of said pad with said backing folded around said pad, the ends of said backing being folded again reversely so that they extend in a direction opposite to that of the folded end portions of said pad and their adhesive coated surfaces face in opposite directions and directly contact opposing inner faces of the said panels of said envelope.

2. A packaged adhesive bandage in accordance with claim 1 wherein the adjacent end portions of said panels provided with said tabs are located at the end of the folded bandage adjacent to the area where the ends of the backing are reversely folded.

3. A packaged adhesive bandage comprising an adhesive bandage and an envelope enclosing the same, said adhesive bandage consisting of a backing having a coating of tacky adhesive material applied on one side thereof and an absorbent dressing pad medially positioned on said adhesive surface and leaving said adhesive surface uncovered at each end of said backing beyond the confines of said pad, said envelope comprising a pair of opposing panels having smooth inner faces sealed together around said bandage and provided with pull tabs at adjacent end portions, said bandage being folded centrally along a transverse line on said pad with said pad surrounding the central portion of said backing, the ends of said backing extending in the same direction as the folded end portions of said pad with the adhesive coated surfaces on said ends facing in opposite directions and directly contacting opposing panels of said envelope.

4. A packaged adhesive bandage in accordance with claim 3, wherein the adjacent end portions of said panels provided with said tabs are located adjacent to the transverse fold in said pad.

5. A packaged adhesive bandage comprising an adhesive bandage and an envelope enclosing the same, said adhesive bandage consisting of a backing having a coating of tacky adhesive material applied on one side thereof, an absorbent dressing pad medially positioned on said adhesive surface and leaving said adhesive surface uncovered at each end of said backing, and facing material covering the adhesive surface on one of said ends, said envelope comprising a pair of opposing panels sealed together completely around and outside the edges of said bandage and provided with pull tabs at adjacent end portions, said adhesive bandage being reversely folded along transverse lines approximately coincident with the transverse edges of said pad so that the ends of said backing extend under said pad, said facing material being inserted between said ends in interleaved relationship, the adhesive surface on the outer folded end contacting one of said panels, the adhesive surface on the inner folded end contacting said facing material, and said pad contacting the other of said panels, whereby upon pulling said tabs in opposite directions the panel contacting said pad is first separated, after which said facing material and the remaining panel are separated from said bandage.

6. A packaged adhesive bandage in accordance with claim 5, wherein the adjacent end portions of the panels provided with said tabs are located adjacent to one of the transverse lines approximately coincident with one Of the transverse edges of said pad.

7. A packaged adhesive bandage comprising an adhesive bandage and an envelope enclosing the same, said adhesive bandage comprising a backing having a coating of adhesive material applied to one surface thereof, said envelope comprising a pair of opposing panels having inner faces sealed together completely around and outside the edges of said bandage and provided with adjacent pull tabs by which said envelope may be opened up, said bandage being infolded transversely across an intermediate section and having end sections folded reversely with respect to the infolded section and flanking said infolded section, said end sections having their adhesive surfaces facing outwardly and in adhesive face contact with said envelope panels respectively.

A packaged adhesive bandage comprising an adhesive bandage and an envelope enclosing the same, said adhesive bandage comprising a backing having a coating of adhesive material applied to one surface thereof, and an absorbent dressing pad positioned on said adhesive surface and spaced from the ends of the bandage to leave said adhesive surface uncovered at each end of said backing, said envelope comprising a pair of opposed panels having inner faces sealed together completely around and outside the edges of said bandage and provided with adjacent pull tabs by which said envelope may be opened up, said bandage being infolded transversely across said pad and having its end sections beyond said pad folded reversely with respect to the infolded section of said bandage and flanking said infolded section, said end sections having their adhesive surfaces facing outwardly and in adhesive face contact with said envelope panels respectively.

9. A packaged adhesive bandage comprising an adhesive bandage and an envelope enclosing the same, said adhesive bandage consisting of a backing having a coating of adhesive material applied to one surface thereof, said envelope comprising a pair of opposing panels having inner faces sealed together completely around said bandage and provided with pull tabs at adjacent end portions, said bandage being folded centrally along a transverse line adjacent to said tabs with the adhesive sides of the bandage on the outside and in adhesive face contact with said panels respectively.

10-. A packaged adhesive bandage comprising an adhesive bandage and an envelope enclosing the same, said adhesive bandage comprising a backing having a coating of adhesive material applied to one surface thereof and an absorbent dressing pad positioned on said adhesive surface and spaced from the ends of the bandage to leave said adhesive surface uncovered at each end of said backing beyond the confines of said pad, said envelope comprising a pair of opposing panels having inner faces sealed together around said bandage and provided with adjacent pull tabs near one end of said envelope, said bandage being folded along a transverse line on said pad with said pad surrounding the intermediate portion of said backing, the ends of said backing extending in the same direction as the folded end portions of said pad with the adhesive coated surfaces on said ends facing in opposite directions and directly contacting opposing panels of said envelope respectively.

11. A packaged adhesive bandage comprising an adhesive bandage and an envelope enclosing the same, said adhesive bandage comprising a backing having a coating of adhesive material applied to one surface thereof, and an absorbent dressing pad positioned on the adhesive surface and spaced from the ends of the bandage to leave said adhesive surface uncovered at each end of said backing, said envelope comprising a pair of opposing panels sealed together completely around and outside the edges of said bandage and provided with adjacent pull tabs, said adhesive bandages being reversely folded along transverse lines approximately coincident with the transverse edges of said pad to bring the end portions of said backing in overlapping relationship under said pad, and a sheet of facing material between the overlapping end portions of said backing, the adhesive surface on the outer folded end portion of said backing being in face contact with one of said panels, and said pad being in face contact with the other panel.

12. A packaged adhesive bandage comprising an adhesive bandage and an envelope enclosing the same, said adhesive bandage comprising a backing having a coating of adhesive material applied to one surface thereof, said bandage having end portions folded along transverse lines in overlapping relationship against an intermediate section of said bandage with the adhesive surface of the end folded portion facing outwardly, a sheet of facing material extending between the overlapping end portions of said bandage in interleaved relationship, said envelope comprising a pair of opposed panels sealed together completely around and outside the edges of said bandage and provided with adjacent pull tabs, the adhesive surface of the outer end folded portion of the bandage contacting one of said panels, and said intermediate section of said bandage contacting the other of said panels.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,172,455 Samuel Sept. 12, 1939 2,706,083 Gross Mar. 1, 1955 2,721,550 Banff Oct. 25, 1955 2,806,593 Abbott Sept. 17, 1957

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Classifications
U.S. Classification206/441
International ClassificationA61F13/02
Cooperative ClassificationA61F13/0203
European ClassificationA61F13/02B