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Publication numberUS2969146 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 24, 1961
Filing dateMay 14, 1958
Priority dateMay 14, 1958
Publication numberUS 2969146 A, US 2969146A, US-A-2969146, US2969146 A, US2969146A
InventorsMetz Henry E
Original AssigneeBaxter Laboratories Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Packaging device and method of manufacture
US 2969146 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jan. 24, 1961 H. E. METZ PACKAGING DEVICE AND METHOD OF MANUFACTURE Filed May 1.4, 1958 United States Patent 4'O PACKAGING DEVICE AND METHOD F MANUFACTURE Henry E. Metz, lGlenview, Ill., assignor to Baxter Laboratories, Inc., Morton Grove, lll., a corporation of Dela- Ware Filed May 14, 1958, Ser. No. 735,225

5 Claims. (Cl. 20G-65) This invention relates to a packaging device and a method of manufacture thereof, and, more particularly, to a device for parenteral tubing sets, and the like.

Parenteral tubing sets usually include a length of exble tubing equipped at each end with puncturing devices so as to communicate a vein or other portion of the body of a patient with a bottle. In some instances, this is done for administering fluids such as glucose, saline, blood, etc. to the patient, and in other instances, for collecting fluids, generally blood, from the patient for subsequent administration to others.

The invention here has particular utility in so far as blood collection sets are concerned, since these sets are ordinarily used close at hand to where they are stored, as in a blood donor center. Heretofore, the blood collection sets have been packaged in two ways. Either they have been individually packaged in small paperboard cartons, or they have been provided loosely in a larger carton. Either type of packaging is considered undesirable. In the first case, considerable space is taken up by the packages, since a blood donor center must have a considerable quantity of these on hand, since a large number might be used in the course of one day. Further, the individual packages create a disposal problem. The other type of packaging often results in a tangled mass of tubing sets, each of which may be several feet long, so that when the nurse or other attendant needs a set, she must reach into what amounts to a tangled mass of spaghetti and disengage a single set. Not only is this inconvenient, but it could also be dangerous. Each set is usually equipped with at least one puncture needle, which is intended to be inserted through the resilient stopper of a blood collection bottle. Although these needles are shielded by protectors, it is possible for the needle to extend through the protector in certain instances and present a sharp point. The protectors also serve the purpose of preventing the entrance of contaminants into the set, which would destroy its sterility. With a jumbled mass of sets, it is possible that a protector might be undetectably punctured, so that an unsterile set might be inadvertently used.

It is a general object of this invention to provide a structure and method of manufacturing the same which overcomes the disadvantages and problems outlined above. Another object is to provide a novel packaging device for parenteral tubing sets, particularly blood collection sets. Still another object is to provide a pack, aging device for parenteral tubing sets which permits orderly positioning of the set in a substantially immobile position, so as to avoid entanglement and possible constriction during packaging and handling, yet which makes the set readily available for use when needed. Yet another object is to provide a packaging device for parenteral tubing sets that serves both as a carton divider and as a mounting plaque.

Still further object is to provide a novel packaging device for parenteral tubing sets which permits ready visual ascertainment at all times of the number of sets Patented Jan. 2er, rsa1 ICC so packaged but which maintains the sets in a substantially immobile position yet readily available for immediate use. Other objects and advantages, both specic and general, can be seen as this specification proceeds.

This invention will be explained in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, in which- Figure l is a top plan View, partially in section, of a large carton housing a number of parenteral tubing sets in accordance with the teachings of this invention;

Fig. 2 is an elevational view of a divider-mounting plaque removed from the carton shown in Fig. l and shown suspended from 'a wall or other vertical surface, with certain of the parenteral tubing sets supported thereon for immediate use;

Fig. 3 is an enlarged longitudinal sectional view of the structure shown in Fig. 2;

Fig. 4 is an enlarged end view of the structure shown in Fig. 2; and

Fig. 5 is a developed elevational view of the structure shown in Fig. 2.

In the illustration given, the numeral 10 in Fig. 1 designates an outer paperboard carton which is shown in cross section. Such a carton may conveniently take the form of a corrugated paperboard box of generally rectangular conliguration and which is equipped with openable top flaps. Such cartons or boxes are in wide use, not only in the field of packaging parenteral tubing sets, but in virtually every other packaging environment, so that further description of the carton is believed unnecessary. Positioned within carton 10 is a mounting member generally designated 11 and which serves to mount and support a plurality of parenteral tubing sets 12. f

Since the overall height of member 11, even when equipped with sets 12, is relatively small in comparison with the height of the usual cartons 10, a number of members 11 can be positioned within each carton 10 and in superimposed relation. Each member is of a generally rectangular shape, and conforms to the interior of carton 10 but has its dimensions so arranged as to permit ready removal thereof from carton 10.

When member 11 is removed from carton 10, it can be suspended from a hook 13 or other mounting device inserted through an opening 14 adjacent one of the sides of member 11. Alternatively, it is possible to equip member 11 with other types of hanger means such as straps, eyes, etc., but I prefer to use holes 14, since they eliminate the need of providing any structure that protrudes above the mounting surface of member 11, and, additionally provides convenient nger inserts for removing member 11 from its position within carton 10.

Referring now speciiically t-o Figs. 2 and 3, it is seen that member 11 is essentially planar and equipped with a pair of upstanding ribs 15. The ribs 15 are provided integral with member 11 and extend upwardly from one of the planar surfaces thereof. The ribs 15 are parallel to each other and parallel, in the illustration given, to the longer sides of the generally rectangular mounting member 11. Further, it is to be noted that the upstanding ribs 15 are spaced apart from each other and spaced inwardly of the sides 16 of mounting member il. to permit the disposition of parenteral tubing sets 12 as seen in Fig, l. Each parenteral tubing set 12 is seen to in clude a length of flexible tubing 12a which terminates at one end in a bottle-puncturing needle 12b. The inner end of the bottle-puncturing needle 12b is equipped with a grasping hub 12C which is grasped between the fingers when the needle 12b is to be linserted into the resilient stopper of a blood collection bottle. As presented in the drawing, the puncture needle 12b is enclosed in a flexible plastic protector which serves to prevent entrance of contaminating microorganisms, and the like, into the interior of set 12. The other end of set 12 is equipped also with a needle (not shown), which is intended for insertion into the vein of a donor. The donor needle, yas can be best appreciated from a consideration of Fig. 3, is also enclosed by a protector which is designated 12d.

Each rib 15 is equipped with a plurality of equally spaced-apart notches or cut-away portions 17 which receive the Ahubs 12C of sets 12 and thereby mount the sets 12 in a substantially immobile condition on member 11. As can be best appreciated from Fig. 4, the ribs l5 extend upwardly a sufficient distance so 4as to perrn the mounting of a number of sets 12 thereon without having a superimposed member lia crush the sets 12 included between members 11a and 1l. This is believed important since a constriction in the sets 12 may result in an improper blood collection by not only slowing down tite ow, but also yby causing hemolysis of the red cells through buieting, turbulence, etc.

Each rib 15 terminates a spaced distance fro-m the ends 18 of member 1i, as can be vbest seen in Fig. 3. Thus, a set 12 can be positioned with its bottle puncture needle positioned intermediate the ribs 15 and coiled on member 11 through the area it? between the ends of ribs 15 and sides 18 and also in the area 2li between the other rib l5 and its associated side 16.

In use, the carton it) is opened in a conventional fash- -ion and the mounting member 1l lifted therefrom as by inserting the forengers into openings id. Because the sets 12 are iirmly received within notches 17, it is possible merely by tilting the member 1l so as to position the rib-equipped face slightly downwardly, to uncoil all of the sets 12 into the condition shown in Fig. 2, where they are all vertically aligned but in side-by-side relation at their mounted ends. Thereafter, the member 11 can be mounted on a hook or other fastening 14. When this is done, it is possible for the person in charge of the donor center, o-r other place where the parenteral tubing sets are to be used, to immediately ascertain whether the correct number of sets has been provided. This same easy ascertainment applies to those concerned with the packing or" the sets in 'the rst instance. Heretofore, when sets were loosely packed, it was` necessary in many instances to weigh a completed carton to insure that the requisite number of sets, say 144, had been included. The arrangement of the mount'mg member li also permits an immediate visual count of the blood collections that have been performed as of a given period. The sets `are so supported on member il as to eliminate any possibility of constricting stress which might render the set useless for blood collection purposes. When the mounting member 11 is supported as seen in Fig. 2, an attractive arrangement of sets is presented in that the lengths of tubing i261 are all disposed vertically, and the topmost set, which is generally the next to be used, is most readily accessible since it has a shorter vertical length. By providing openings 14 at either end of member 1T., the person removing the mounting members 1i. irons the carton i can immediately suspend the member 11 without having to shift it around in order to get it properly aligned.

I have found it desirable to construct member lli of corrugated paperboard, although it is possible to construct member ll of other materials such as plastics. When constructing member of corrugated paperboard, l prefer to take a generally rectangular blank corresponding to the developed view shown in Fig. which is generally designated by the number 2l. This blankv is provided with creases or scoring along a plurality of parallel lines 22, 23, 24, 2S, Zo, 27, and 28. The lines 23a-2d are grouped into two groups of three each, with the lines in each group being equally spaced apart. The sides E Q are notched out as at 29 between the outer lines 26 and 22;, and 23 and of group of lines, to provide the areas 19 designated in l. rThe portions of the blank 21 between opposed cut-outs 2@ are also cut paperboard is employed las the materi-ai of construction for member 11, I make the creases or scores 22, 24 and 26 on one side of the blank, as can be appreciated from the solid lines shown in Fig. 5, while the scoring along lines 23, 25, 26 and 28 are on the reverse side, as designated by the dotted lines employed in Fig. 5. For scoring, it is only necessary to partially rupture one ply or liner of the two outer liners with which the corrugated board is provided. Thereafter, the blank 21 is folded along lines 23-28 to provide a pair of upstanding ribs each equipped with a plurality of notches.

Blank 21 can then be folded on itself along the line 22 to provide a backing 31 for the portion 32 having the upstanding ribs. Since it is desirable for portion 31 to be coterminous with portion 32 when the ribs are provided therein, I provide the scoring along line 22 at a position so that the width of portion 31 equals the width of portion 32 less the width o-f two cut-out portions 29. To maintain the ribs 15 in an upstanding position, I unite portions 31 and 32 by means of staples 33, as can be best seen in Fig. 4.

Thereafter, with a single punching, it is possible to provide Openings 14 extending through both portions 32 and 31. Alternatively, if desired, the openings 14 in portions 31 and 32 can be provided prior to the folding of these two portions together.

While, in the foregoing specification, a detailed description of an embodiment of the invention has been set forth in considerable detail for the purpose of explanation, it will be apparent that those skilled in the art may make many modifications in such details without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention.

I claim:

l. In a packaging device for blood collection sets having a length of flexible tubing equipped at one end with a puncture needle, a generally rectangular outer carton, a flat generally rectangular mounting member removably tted within said carton, a pair of spacedapart, elongated, upstanding ribs on a flat surface of said member, said ribs being parallel to the longer sides of said member and spaced inwardly of said sides, said ribs terminating short of the shorter sides of said member, a plurality of equally spaced-apart recesses extending laterally through said ribs, a like plurality of sets with the needles thereof positioned within said recesses with the tubing portions thereof coiled between said ribs and the sides of said member, and suspending means adjacent each of the shorter sides of said member.

2. In a packaging device for parenteral tubing sets, and the like, a generally rectangular outer carton, at least two carton-conforming, planar divider members in said cartion in superposed relation, two elongated upstanding ribs on a planar surface of each of said meinbers, said ribs being spaced inwardly of and parallel to one pair of carton sides and terminating short of the other pair of carton sides, a plurality of set-receiving notches in each of said ribs, a like plurality of parenteral tubing sets disposed between adjacent members and mounted in said notches, and means associated with each of said members for suspending the same in a generally vertical plane.

3. In a packaging device for blood collection sets each having a length of flexible tubing equipped at one end with a puncture needle, a generally rectangular outer carton, a plurality of tray-type inner members removably tted in superposed relation within said carton, a pair of spaced-apart upstanding ribs on a flat surface of each of said members, said ribs being spaced inwardly of and parallel to one pair of sides of said member, said pair of ribs terminating a spaced. distance short of the other pair of sides of said member, a plurality of equally spaced-apart needle protector-receiving recesses extending laterally through said ribs, a like plurality of parenteral tubing sets having needle protectors mounted in said recesses with the exible tubing portions thereof coiled between said ribs and the sides of said' member and between adj'acent members, and means associated with each inner member for suspending same in a generally vertical plane.

4. In a packaging device for blood collection sets each having a length of ileXible tubing equipped at one end with a puncture needle and a needle protector, a generally rectangular outer carton, a iiat generally rec tangular inner member removably fitted in said carton, said member having a pair of upstanding ribs in spacedapart parallel relation, said pair of ribs being spaced inwardly of and parallel to one pair of sides of said member, said pair of ribs terminating a spaced distance from the other pair of sides of said member, a plurality of equally spaced-apart needle-receiving recesses extending laterally through said ribs, a like plurality of parenteral tubing sets having their needle ends mounted in said recesses with the iexible tubing being coiled in said spaced distance and the area between the other of said ribs and its adjacent side, and a hook-receiving opening extending through said member and :adjacent one of the said other pair of sides thereof.

5. In a packaging device for parenteral tubing sets each having a length of flexible tubing equipped at one end with a hub-equipped puncture needle and a needle protector, a generally rectangular outer carton, a -plu rality of carton-conforming inner members removably positioned in said carton in superposed relation, each of said members having a pair of upstanding ribs in spacedapart, parallel relation, said pair of ribs being spaced inwardly of and parallel to one pair of sides of said member, said pair of ribs terminating a spaced distance from the other pair of sides of said member, a plurality of equally spaced-apart, needle-receiving recesses extending laterally through said ribs, a like plurality of parenteral tubing sets having their needle hubs mounted in said recesses with the flexible tubing being coiled in said spaced distance and the area between the other of said ribs and the adjacent side of said member, and means associated with said at inner member for suspending the same in a generally vertical plane.

References Cited in the le of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 615,702 Hills Dec. 13, 1898 1,779,146 Reckford Oct. 21, 1930 2,319,556 Rhein May 18, 1943 2,426,899 Pantalone Sept. 2, 1947 2,568,108 Barton Sept. 18, 1951 2,677,993 Ens May 11, 1954 2,839,188 Cipriani et al. June 17, 1958

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US615702 *Mar 17, 1898Dec 13, 1898 James edwin hills
US1779146 *May 25, 1928Oct 21, 1930American Lead Pencil CompanyDisplay rack
US2319556 *Feb 26, 1941May 18, 1943Kimble Glass CoPhysician's package
US2426899 *May 24, 1945Sep 2, 1947Nat Folding Box Company IncMaking collapsible structures
US2568108 *Sep 28, 1949Sep 18, 1951Mead Johnson & CoDispensing closure for sterile liquid containers
US2677993 *Jun 28, 1949May 11, 1954Magnus Harmonica CorpMethod and apparatus for pleating blanks of laminated sheet material and preformed blanks of laminated sheet material
US2839188 *Dec 6, 1954Jun 17, 1958Vitramon IncPackaging means for small electric units
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3645759 *Jun 25, 1970Feb 29, 1972Us ArmyMethod of packing flexible packages in a cylindrical container
US4282972 *Feb 15, 1980Aug 11, 1981Chiulli Robert DPan for angiographic catheters
US4332322 *Sep 2, 1980Jun 1, 1982Champion International CorporationFolder to hold coil of plastic tubing with clamp and fittings
US5163554 *Jan 10, 1992Nov 17, 1992Merit Medical Systems, Inc.System and method for packaging coils of tubing
US5309604 *Mar 11, 1993May 10, 1994Merit Medical Systems, Inc.Coiling/uncoiling device for tubing
US20040195132 *Apr 26, 2004Oct 7, 2004Jane SheetzFiberoptic coil tray and carrier package
WO1993014006A1 *Dec 21, 1992Jul 22, 1993Merit Medical Systems, Inc.System and method for packaging coils of tubing
Classifications
U.S. Classification206/364
International ClassificationA61M39/00, A61M39/08, B65D5/50
Cooperative ClassificationB65D5/504, A61M39/08
European ClassificationB65D5/50D4C, A61M39/08