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Publication numberUS2969863 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 31, 1961
Filing dateMay 21, 1956
Priority dateMay 21, 1956
Publication numberUS 2969863 A, US 2969863A, US-A-2969863, US2969863 A, US2969863A
InventorsEgbert Woldring, Peter Weltevrede
Original AssigneeRapids Standard Co Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Conveyorized storage racks
US 2969863 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

E. WOLDRING ET AL Jan. 31, 1961 CONVEYORIZED STORAGE RACKS 3 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed May 21, 1956 INVENTORS Egbert Wo/a'ring Peter We/fevrede ATTORNEYS Jan. 31, 1961 E. WOLDRING ETAL 2,969,863

CONVEYORIZED STORAGE RACKS Filed May 21, 1956 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTORS E gberf Wo/or/ng Peter We/fevrede BYQ QLWZ C ATTORNEYS E. WOLDRING ET AL 2,9693863 CONVEYORIZED STORAGE RACKS Jan. 31, 1961 13 Sheets-Sheet 3 Filed May 21, 1956 9 3 in? c 6 b E w .[r 2- RB o a w w F 21% w 45 0 47a Fig. '/0

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. 8 9d Mr e 0 N f T a V S m/ 8 Y V 0 E W 6 N W m f T w r r 8 A WM. EP

CONVEYORIZED STORAGE RACKS Egbert Woldring and Peter Weltevrede, Grand Rapids, Mich assignors to The Rapids-Standard Company, Inc, Grand Rapids, Mich., a corporation of Michigan Filed May 21, 1956, Ser. No. 586,248

6 Claims. (Cl. 193-35) This invention relates to carton vending units or mechanical dispensers and more particularly to a conveyorized storage rack in which the materials contained in boxes or on palettes are placed for travel on tracks.

Among the primary objects of this invention is to provide a storage rack which is sturdy, capable of rapid assembly and erection. It is intended that the rack be so designed that it may be entirely fabricated from a few simple shapes, thereby reducing both the material cost and the die cost necessary for its production.

It is the further object of this invention to provide a conveyorized storage rack made of standard components requiring only the utilization of different length racks for lengthening or shortening the rack.

Still another object of this invention is to provide a conveyorized storage rack constructed of two towers and a plurality of rails spanning the towers and forming the tracks for the rack.

It is an additional object of this invention to provide a novel type support means for the rails whereby the position of the tracks can be varied to obtain the desired width. By this means the number and width of tracks for a standard unit can be varied by merely changing the position of the rails for the tracks and, if required, adding or subtracting rails.

Still another object of this invention is to provide a conveyorized storage rack constructed of the least number of parts while at the same time providing a rigid and sturdy rack capable of rapid assembly and rapid erection.

Another object of this invention is to provide a novel type rail for the tracks, such rails being of simple construction and eliminating the need of any separate up right guides for the various tracks.

These and other objects and purposes of this invention will be immediately seen by those acquainted with the design and manufacture of storage rack equipment upon reading the following specification and accompanying drawings wherein:

Fig. 1 is a side elevational view of a storage rack constructed according to this invention.

Fig. 2 is a front elevational view of the storage rack of Fig. l at the discharge end.

Fig. 3 is an enlarged, fragmentary, sectional view taken along the plane Ill-III of Fig. 2.

Fig. 4 is an enlarged, fragmentary, sectional view taken along the plane IVIV of Fig. 2.

Fig. 5 is a fragmentary, elevational side view of the front end of one of the rails of the rack of Figs. 1 and 2.

Fig. 6 is an enlarged, elevational front view of one of the center rails of the rack of Figs. 1 and 2.

Fig. 7 is an enlarged, elevational front view of one of the rails on each side of the rack of Figs. 1 and 2.

Fig. 8 is a fragmentary, plan view of the storage rack appearing in Fig. 1.

Fig. 9 is an enlarged, fragmentary, front elevational 2,969,863 Patented Jan. 31, 1961 view of a modified side rail adapted for use with the rack of this invention.

Fig. 10 is a fragmentary, front elevational view of the rack with a modified conveyor rail.

Fig. 11 is an enlarged, fragmentary, sectional view taken along the plane XI-XI of Fig. 10.

Fig. 12 is an enlarged, fragmentary, sectional view taken along the plane XIIXII of Fig. 10.

Fig. 13 is a fragmentary, elevational view of one of the modified rails of the rack of Fig. 10 illustrating the ad justment of the rail along the cross bar.

Fig. 14 is a fragmentary, front elevational view of still another modified conveyor rail.

Fig. 15 is an enlarged, fragmentary, sectional viewv taken along the plane XV-XV of Fig. 14.

Fig. 16 is an enlarged, fragmentary, sectional view taken along the plane XVI-XVI of Fig. 14.

Fig. 17 is an enlarged plan view of a nut for securing the component rack parts together.

Fig. 18 is an enlarged elevational view of a nut for securing the component rack parts together.

Briefly, this invention is concerned with a conveyorized storage rack having two separate, independent, self-supporting, skeleton towers each constructed of a pair of spaced upright rectangular side frames. The side frames are braced by diagonal struts secured to the vertical standards of the frames. The towers each have several vertically spaced pairs of horizontal cross bars secured to and extending between the frames. Each of the pairs of bars on one tower is arranged with respect to a pair of bars on the other tower to form a set of bars lying on one of several planes. Each set of bars supports a plurality of rails arranged side by side to form the tracks.

In the preferred form of this invention, the cross bars have slots extending lengthwise thereof. The intermediate rails are supported by Z-bar clips bolted into a slot in both the cross bar and rails. This feature permits the rails to be adjusted along the cross bars for adjusting the width of the tracks formed by the rails.

The preferred rail for use in this invention consists of a U-shaped rail having a web portion between two sides. Rollers are secured to each side of the intermediate rails with the peripheries thereof below the web portion of the rail. Accordingly, the sides serve as guides and eliminate the necessity for providing separate and independent guides for the tracks. Preferably, there are rollers on each side of the rail and therefore the rail serves as a trackway support for adjacent sides of two adjacent tracks. This decreases the number of rails required.

In the following description outwardly is used and shall be taken to mean away from the center of the tower. Horizontal shall be taken to mean substantially horizontal to the surface on which the rack is supported. Facing downwardly means in a direction toward said surface and conversely facing upwardly means in a direction away from said surface.

Referring to the drawings the reference numeral 1 indicates an assembled storage rack having the towers 10 and the span rails 30 forming the tracks. Each of the towers 10 consists of parallel, upright, rectangular frames having cross bars 14 extending between the frames for supporting the rails 39. Each frame includes upright standards '11 and the horizontal stringers or tie bars 12 adjacent top and bottom. Each frame is braced by a diagonal strut 13 secured to the upright standards 11. The struts 13 of alternate frames extend across the frames in opposite directions so that regardless of the force exerted on a tower, one strut is in tension and the other in compression.

The towers 10 consist of two or more frames in any one tower arranged parallel to each other. If there are more than two frames the cross beams 14 extend the entire distance between all of the frames and are secured to the respective standards 11. Regardless of the number of frames utilized, the direction the diagonal struts 13 extend is different for each alternate rectangular frame. In the modification illustrated, we have shown only two frames, however, a greater number may be used.

The cross bars 14 at one end of each tower are higher than at the other end. By the same token, the cross bars of one tower are higher than those on the other tower. This arrangement gives the rails 39 a downward inclination toward the discharge end. The difference in vertical location of the cross bars on the respective towers in relation with each other is dependent upon the amount of inclination it is desired to give the rails. Normally in a ten foot rail 21 height differential of about six inches between the ends is sufficient. Regardless of the inclination it is necessary that the cross beams 14 be arranged in sets, each set lying on the same plane and different sets lying on spaced planes. This permits the rails 30 to abut and be supported by the cross bars 14 without excessive sagging or bending. It is possible, and it may be desirable, to incline these planes at different angles, but in the general use of such a type storage rack the planes on which cross beams are located are preferably parallel.

The rails 30 are of suflicient length to span the two towers 1t) and project slightly out from each end of the towers. The upper projecting ends at the loading end provide an easily accessible means for loading the tracks 30 while the projecting ends at the discharge end provide an easily accessible means for unloading the tracks 30.

The upright standards 11 and the cross beams 14 are of identical cross sectional shape and size. Each is a channel section generally U-shaped having a pair of parallel sides 15 connected by a web or bight portion 16 (Fig. 4). At the open end of the channel the free ends of the sides 15 are turned inwardly and bac kwardly upon themselves to form a pair of inwardly extending flanges 17. The flanges are spaced from the side 15 and from each other, thus providing a central slot 18 forming the open face of the channel.

The horizontal stringers 12 and the diagonal struts '13 are constructed of any suitable shape and size. They can be constructed of the same stock as the upright standards 11 and cross beams 14. The horizontal stringers 12 are secured near the ends of the upright standards -11 to form the rectangular frame. This securement is done by welding or any other suitable method. The diagonal struts 13 are secured to the upright standards 11 by any suitable means such as welding.

The upright standards 11 are positioned so that the open slots 18' face outwardly of the towers (Fig. 2). Secured to the open end of the standards 11 are the U-shaped brackets 19. The brackets 19 have flanges 20 with apertures 21 for receiving the bolts 22 (Fig. 3). The flanges 20 of the U-shaped bracket 19 bear against the inwardly extending flanges 17 of the standards 11 and are secured to the standards by nuts 23. Nuts 23 are of rectangular outline having a central threaded opening 24 and narrow slots 25 adjacent and parallel to each of their ends (Figs. 17 and 18). The bottom of these slots is serrated for improving the gripping of the ends of the flanges 17. The width of the nut is such that it may be inserted through the slot 18 and then rotated to seat the ends of the flanges 17 in the slot 25. When the bolt 22 is tightened, the nuts are clamped tightly about the ends of flanges 17 and by reason of the serrations are positively held against sliding downwardly on the standard 11. Since these nuts may be attached at any point along the end standards, it is seen that the vertical spacing between the cross beams 14 may be quickly and easily adjusted. The preferred rails constituting the tracks 30 are inverted, U-shaped channels each having the sides 31 connected by the web, portion 32 at the top (Figs.

6 and 7). The bottom has an open end formed by the sides 31 being turned inwardly and upwardly upon themselves to form a pair of inwardly extending flanges 33. The flanges 33 are spaced from the sides 31 and from each other, thus providing a central slot 34. It should be realized that the cross sectional shape and size of the trail 30 is identical to the cross sectional shape and size of the upright standards 11 and the cross beams 14. This is provided, as will be explained in detail hereinafter, to facilitate securing the rail 31 to the cross beams 14.

The tracks are made up of two types of rails: the rails 30a adjacent the side frames and the rails 36b intermediate the side frames. The only diiference between these rails is that the rails 30:: have only one wheel on the side 31 while the intermediate rails 3612 have wheels on each of the sides 31.

In both types of rails an axle 35 extends through the two sides 31 and protrudes from each side. Any standard wheel 36 is rotatably mounted on the ends of axle 35. Fig. 7 shows the rail 30a with one wheel 36 on one of the sides 31. Fig. 6 shows one of the intermediate rails 38b with the two wheels 36 on each of the sides 31.

Fig. 9 illustrates another way of rotatably mounting the wheels on the sides of the channels. This construction constitutes a shaft 60 extending through only one side wall and upset at the end to form a head 61 securing the shaft to the side wall.

A common feature of the rails illustrated in Figs. 6, 7 and 9 is the position of the wheel peripheries in respect to the web of the channel. The periphery of the wheel always terminates short of the top of the channel. Thus, the sides 31 provide a guide for the tracks as well as a support for the wheels. Side rail 30a provides a conveyorized support and guide means for one track. The intermediate rails 3% are common to two tracks. Thus, one wheel and side provides the conveyorized support and guide means for one side of one track, and the other wheel and side serves as the conveyorized support and guide for the next adjacent track.

At the discharge end of each of the rails 36a and 30b is a cylindrical stop 39 (Figs. 1, 2 and 8). The stops 39 are secured to the end of the channel and extend transversely of the channel slightly beyond the thickness of the wheels 36 (Figs. 2 and 8). The stops are secured to the channels by any suitable means such as welding. With this arrangement the stop projects into the path of the travel of an article riding on the wheels. It should be recognized that where this storage rack is used in conjunction with a conveyor system for receiving the goods from the discharge end of the conveyor rack, some other type of stop means may be employed. Such stop means may be equipped for manual or automatic release of the articles. If desired it may be operated by remote control.

Fig. 4 shows a means for securing the rails 36 to the cross beams 14 when the open slot 18 of cross beam 14 and the open slot 34 of rails 30a and 30b faces downwardly. A Z-shaped bracket 40 is provided for securing the two components together. The bracket 40 has an upper horizontal flange 41, a vertical web 42, and a lower horizontal flange 43. The rails 39a and 30b are each secured to the horizontal flange 41 by a bolt 45 extending through an opening 49 of flange 41 and into the slot 34 of rail 30a or 30b. A nut 46, identical to the nut 23 of Figs. 17 and 18, previously described, receives the bolt 45 and the rail flange 33 for securing the rail to the flange 41 of bracket 40. The side 15 of cross bar 14 bears against vertical web 42. The lower horizontal flange 43 extends across the flanges 17 and open slot 18 of cross bars 14. A bolt 47 extends through the opening 44 of flange 43 and into the slot 18. The bolt 47 is received by a nut 48 of identical construction to the nuts 23 and 46. The serrated slots of the nuts 48 receive the flanges 17. This secures flange 43 to the cross beams 14 and by reason of the serrated slots the rails are prevented from sliding on cross bars 14 when nuts 48 are tightened. However, when nuts 48 are loosened the rails are permitted to slide on the cross bars.

With this arrangement the rails 30 are easily adjusted along the cross beams 14 by merely loosening the nuts 48 and sliding the rails 30 along the bars 14 to positions corresponding with the desired width of the articles supported on the rack. Accordingly, with this invention it is possible to adjust the width and height of the tracks in order to adapt the rack for receiving and supporting different size articles. The vertical adjustment is made by loosening the nuts 22 and adjusting the vertical position of the cross beams 14 on the standards 11. The lateral position of the rails 30 is accomplished by loosening the nuts 48 and adjusting the rails along the beams 14. It may be necessary in such adjustments to add or take away one or more intermediate rails 30b.

Modifications Figs. 10, 11, 12 and 13 illustrate a modification of this storage rack. In this modification, the towers are exactly the same. The diflference lies in the arrangement of the cross beams 14b and the rails 30c and 30d. The cross beam 14b rather than having its open slot facing downwardly has its open slot facing outwardly of the tower (Fig. 11).

In this modification the cross beam 14b is secured to the standards 11 by the U-shaped bracket 19a of greater depth than brackets 19. Bracket 19a has flanges 20:: secured to the upright standards 11 by the bolts extending through the aperture 21a and into the slot 18 of the standard. The nuts 23a, of identical construction to nut 23, receive the bolts and secure the U-shaped bracket and thus the cross beam 14b to the flanges 17 of the standard 11.

In order to secure the rail title and 30a to the cross beams 1412, an L-shaped bracket 41a is provided. Bracket 400 has a horizontal flange 41a and a vertical flange 42a. The flange 41a has an opening 49a, and flange 42a has an aperture 44a. These apertures receive the bolts 45a and 47a, respectively. The horizontal flange 41a is secured to the rails 3130 or 30d by the bolts 45a and the nuts 46a. The bolt 47a and nut 48a secure the flange 42a to the cross beam 14a. These securement means are identical to those previously described in relation to bracket 41 and therefore will not be repeated.

With this arrangement, the rails 30c and 30d are permitted to be adjusted along the cross beams or bars 14:! by simply loosening the nuts 47a and sliding the rails along the beam. Then the bolts 47a are tightened to rigidly secure the rails on the cross beams.

The rails 30c and 30d are of different construction than rails 30a and 30b. This construction is similar to that disclosed in the patent of De Graaf et al. 2,786,578. In this particular modification the web 32a of each of the channels is provided with a plurality of equally spaced, rectangular apertures 38. A freely rotatable conveyor wheel 36a is mounted in each of these apertures. Each conveyor wheel 36a is secured to a bolt or axle 35a extending through the sides 31a of the channel. Only a small portion of the conveyor wheels 36a project above the top surfaces of the tracks 30c and 30d. The amount of wheels projecting above the tracks is only sufficient to assure travel of the boxes, crates or palettes along the tracks with no contact at the top surface of the rails.

A guide member 37 is secured to one of the sides 31a to serve as a guide for the articles riding on the wheels 36a. The intermediate rails 30d are constructed of two channels secured together with a common guide member 39 provided between them. (Fig. 10).

Another modification is illustrated in Figs. 14, 15 and 16. In this particular modification, the tracks constitute roller conveyors formed by two U-shaped channels 50 between which are secured the rollers 51. Each of the roller tracks is a separate unit and is supported by the 6 cross beam 140. Cross beam 14c is secured to the standards by the U-shaped bracket 190 (Fig. 15). This is accomplished by the bolt 22c and the nut 23c which attach the flanges 200 to the upright standard 110.

The tower and span arrangement of Fig. 1 is adapted to this modification. Towers are first set up and then spaced a desired distance. Then an L-shaped bracket 52 is secured to flanges of the rail 50 by the bolts and nuts 53. This flange is positioned on the rails so that the vertical flange 54 of bracket 52 bears against the cross beam when the unit is assembled (Fig. 16). The channels 50 rest on the cross beams 14c and are prevented from sliding forwardly by the flange 54. Preferably a shim 55 is provided between the cross beam 140 and the rail. The thickness of this shim depends upon the desired inclination of the rail. Thus, shims of different thicknesses can be substituted in order to vary the inclination of the roller tracks.

For simplicity reasons the operation of the specific embodiment of Figs. 1-8 will be described. The operation of the other modifications should then be obvious.

Operation Preferably the side frames are preassembled before being shipped. The cross beams 14, side frames, rails 30a and 30b, and brackets 19 and 40, are then shipped as separate components. In the assembling of the entire unit the side frames of each tower are arranged parallel to each other and the cross beams secured to standards 11 by the U-shaped brackets 19. The vertical spacing of the cross beams is determined by the desired vertical spacing between the sets of rails 30. The cross beams are secured to the frames so that a set of four beams are all located on one plane as previously described. This permits the rails 30 to be supported by the cross beams 14 at four points without sagging or bending.

The spacing of the towers depends to some extent upon loading to be imposed upon the rack and the strength of the rails. The lighter the loading and the greater the rail strength the greater tower spacing permitted.

After having set up the towers by securing the cross beams 14 across the frames the towers are separate independent and self-supporting units. The rails 30a and 30b are then secured to the cross beams at the proper positions by the brackets 40. In securing the rails to the cross beams the rails are adjusted laterally along the beams to provide the proper spacing for the articles.

Rails 30a and 30b of Figs. 6 and 7 are preferred because of the simplicity of their structure which functions to provide a conveyorized support means and guide means. The rails 30a are secured adjacent each of the frames. The rails 30b are spaced properly along the cross beam in order to provide the desired width tracks. With this arrangement the sides 31 of the channel provide the guide means and the rollers provide the conveyorized support means for conveying the articles down the track.

When all the cross bars and rails are in place and secured, the entire rack is assembled and ready for use. The resulting rack is rigid and sturdy and will sustain a heavy vertical load. It is adapted for the storage of small or large parts and the length of the storage rack is only limited by the strength of the rails and the space available. In using the rack the articles to be stored, usually in cartons or boxes, are placed on the feed end of the rack and they ride down to the discharge end. Usually the entire rack is substantially kept full so that there are cartons or articles along the entire tracks. When a box or article is taken off the discharge end at the stop end 37, the articles or boxes in back of it move downwardly and strike the stop 37. Thus, so long as there are boxes on the tracks there will always be one ready for easy removal at the discharge end of the rails. As the supply becomes depleted the storage rack may be easily restocked by loading additional boxes on the receiving or loading end 40 of the storage rack. These boxes, as loaded, will automatically move down the rail 30 until further movement is limited either by the stops 37 or by other boxes already on the rails. The rack is so designed that it provides a maximum amount of storage for the space occupied.

In many uses of this rack, it becomes desirable to adapt it for different size articles. This storage rack is adapted for such modifications. A change for taller or shorter articles is made by merely loosening nuts 22 and increasing or decreasing the space between the cross beams as desired. This, of course, has to be done on all of the cross beams in order that the vertical spacing along the entire track is the same. After loosening the nuts 23 and adjusting the position of the cross beams 14, the nuts are then tightened resulting in a rigid and sturdy rack which will sustain a heavy vertical loading.

The adjustment of the storage rack for purposes of adapting it for greater or less width articles is accomplished by loosening of the nut 48 so that the rails 30 are permitted to slide along the beams. After repositioning the rails, the nuts are retightened.

It should be evident that both initial installation and subsequent adjustment is easily accomplished since only the most rudimentary tools are required. The entire installation can be accomplished by a wrench that can loosen and tighten the bolts and nuts which secure the cross beams to the frames and the rails to the cross beams.

In the modification of Figs. l4, l5, and 16, the adjustment of the width of the tracks is somewhat limited. The only adjustment is to remove or to place another roller track between the upright standards 110. Of course this necessitates adjusting the position of the standards along the beams or vice versa. This modification is especially adapted for varying the inclination by simply inserting a shim between the rail 50 and the cross beams 140.

Having described our invention, it should be evident that it provides a simple, sturdy, adjustable and inexpensive storage rack arrangement. Various modifications and embodiments of this invention may be made without departing from the principle thereof. All of these modifications are to be considered as included in the hereinafter appended claims unless these claims by their language expressly state otherwise.

We claim:

1. A conveyorized storage rack, comprising; side frames; pairs of cross bars secured to and extending between said side frames, the cross bars of each of said pairs being arranged to lie within a horizontally inclined plane, each of said pairs in difierent parallel inclined planes; slots in said cross bars extending in a direction longitudinally of said cross bars; a plurality of elongated rails supported by said pairs of cross bars; each of said rails being constructed of a bar having two sides; wheels rotatably supported solely on said rails and disposed on at least one of said sides, the periphery of said wheels terminating short of the top of said bar so as to cause the side of said bar to serve as a guide; said rails being spaced parallel to each other with said wheels being located on adjacent sides to form a track for a predetermined Width article therebetween; means for securing said tracks to said cross bars, said means extending through said slots and adapted to be loosened whereby when said means is loosened it can slide in said slots and said tracks can be adjusted along said cross bar for adjusting the space between the sides of said rails thus permitting the adjustment of the width of the track formed by said rails.

2. A conveyorized storage rack, comprising; separate, self-supporting towers in respectively aligned and spaced relation to each other; said towers each including a plurality of cross bars secured in parallel and vertically spaced relation across the respectively aligned ends thereof; the cross bars of each respective tower, and of the respectively aligned towers, being disposed in mutually parallel inclined planes; and pairs of elongated wheeled tracks extending between said aligned towers and thereacross; each of said pairs of tracks being secured to coplanar cross bars of said towers and being disposed in inclined and respectively parallel spaced relation to each other; said tracks providing side braces within said towers, as secured between the cross bars thereof, and forming extended gravity feed storage tracks as extended across and between said aligned towers.

3. A conveyorized storage rack, comprising; separate, self-supporting towers in respectively aligned and spaced relation to each other; said towers each including a pair of side frames having vertical standards and a diagonal strut secured therebetween; a plurality of cross bars secured in parallel and vertically spaced relation between adjacent standards of said side frames for securing said side frames together and forming said towers; the cross bars of each respective tower, and of the respectively aligned towers, being disposed in mutually parallel inclined planes; and pairs of elongated wheeled tracks extending between said aligned towers and thereacross; each of said pairs of tracks being secured to coplanar cross bars of said towers and being disposed in inclined and respectively parallel spaced relation to each other; said tracks providing side braces within said towers, as secured between the cross bars thereof, and forming extended gravity feed storage tracks as extended across and between said aligned towers.

4. A conveyorized storage rack, comprising; separate, self-supporting towers in respectively aligned and spaced relation to each other; said towers each including a pair of side frames having a plurality of cross bars secured in parallel and vertically spaced relation therebetween for securing said side frames together and forming said towers, the cross bars of each respective tower, and of the respectively aligned towers, being disposed in mutually parallel inclined planes and having elongated slots formed longitudinally therein; pairs of elongated wheeled tracks extending between said aligned towers and thereacross; each of said pairs of tracks being secured to coplanar cross bars of said towers and being disposed in inclined and respectively parallel spaced relation to each other; said tracks providing side braces within said towers, as secured between the cross bars thereof, and forming extended gravity feed storage tracks as extended across and between said aligned towers; and adjustable means extending through said elongated slots of said cross bars and engaged with said tracks for securing said tracks in laterally adjustable relation to said cross bars and thereby providing storage tracks of readily adjustable widths.

5. A conveyorized storage rack, comprising; separate, self-supporting towers in respectively aligned and spaced relation to each other; said towers each including a plurality of cross bars secured in parallel and vertically spaced relation across the respectively aligned ends thereof; the cross bars of each respective tower, and or" the respectively aligned towers, being disposed in mutually parallel inclined planes; and pairs of elongated wheeled tracks extending between said aligned towers and thereacross; each of said pairs of tracks being secured to coplanar cross bars of said towers and being disposed in inclined and respectively parallel spaced relation to each other; said towers being substantially braced by said tracks against twisting motion under load, and forming extended gravity feed storage tracks as extended across and between said aligned towers. I

6. A conveyorized storage rack, comprising; separate, self-supporting towers in respectively aligned and spaced relation to each other; said towers each including a pair of side frames having vertical standards and a diagonal strut secured therebetween; a plurality of cross bars secured in parallel and vertically spaced relation between adjacent standards of said side frames for securing said side frames together and forming said towers; the cross bars of each respective tower, and of the respectively References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 315,034 Holman Apr. 7, 1885 376,340 Palmer Jan. 10, 1888 377,894 Hart Feb. 14, 1888 714,432 Alvey Nov. 25, 1902 10 Harris Jan. 25, 1916 Crawford Mar. 21, 1916 Wolf Feb. 6, 1917 Davis Oct. 19, 1917 Stutsman Apr. 21, 1925 Browne Apr. 30, 1935 Ross Apr. 26, 1938 Attwood Apr. 4, 1944 Abbott Apr. 23, 1946 Parisi Apr. 24, 1951 Cushman Apr. 29, 1952 Brent Sept. 2, 1952 Cook Sept. 6, 1955 Sullivan Apr. 3, 1956 De Graaf Mar. 26, 1957 FOREIGN PATENTS Canada May 31, 1955 France Apr. 17, 1909

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Classifications
U.S. Classification193/35.00R, 211/59.2, 211/151
International ClassificationB65G1/02
Cooperative ClassificationB65G1/023
European ClassificationB65G1/02A