Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2970184 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJan 31, 1961
Filing dateMar 5, 1958
Priority dateMar 5, 1958
Publication numberUS 2970184 A, US 2970184A, US-A-2970184, US2970184 A, US2970184A
InventorsIsaac S Blonder
Original AssigneeBlonder Tongue Elect
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Electric cable connector
US 2970184 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Jan. 3l, 1961 l. s. BLONDER 2,970,184

ELECTRIC CABLE CONNECTOR Filed March 5, 1958 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Fay 4 INVENTOR.

Arrozym Jam 31 19.51 s. BLONDE-R 2,970,184

ELECTRIC CABLE CONNECTOR Filed March 5, 1958 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Fg, f

dldd

Patented Jan. 31, 1961 ELECTRIC CABLE COJNNECTOR lsaac S. Blender, West Orange, NJ., assigner to Blendern Tongue Electronics, a corporation of New .lersey Filed Mar. 5, 1958, Ser. No. 719,325'

8 Claims. (Cl. 174-88) The present invention relates to electrical cable connectors, and more specifically, to connectors that are particularly adapted for use with coaxial-line cables and the like.

As described in my copending application, Serial No. 574,906, tiled March 29, 1956, for Transmission-Line Connector, it is frequently important to provide a transmission-line connector that can be quickly and reliably applied to or removed from the line, preferably Without the necessity for solder joints or other time-consuming connecting structures. While the said copending application discloses apparatus particularly suited for such purposes as providing male and female coaxial connectors, it is important to provide, also, for other types of connection, such as splice-connections between two sections of coaxial cable.

lt is with this last problem that the present invention is primarily concerned, though an object of the invention is to provide -a novel connector of more general utility, as well.

A further object is to provide -a new and improved solderless connector wherein, in summary, the use of a single appropriate conductive body for receiving and aligning the transmissioneline cable and one or more staples may effect rapid, reliable and inexpensive solderless connection.

Other and further objects will be explained hereinafter and will be more particularly pointed out in the appended claims:

The invention will now be described in connection with the accompanying drawing, Fig. l of which is a perspective view of a preferred splice-connector constructed in accordance with the present invention;

Figs. 2 and 3 are fragmentary transverse and longitudinal sections, respectively, taken along the lines 2 2 and 3)*3 of Fig. 1, looking in the direction of the arrows; and

Figs. 4 through 7 are views similar to Fig. 3 of modifications.

A pair of coaxial transmission-line cable sections A and B are shown in Fig. 1 each having innerconductors El', outer coaxial sheath, braid or other conductors 3, 3 separated therefrom by cylindrical polyethelene or other insulation spacers 5, 5'; and an outer Vinyl or other insulation covering 7, 7. The cable sections Aand B are shown received within openings 9, 9 at opposite ends of a generally cylindrical conductive body ll, which openings are preferably only sufficiently large to receive the cables A and B snugly, in order to align the same without appreciable play. It has been found that in such cables as, for example, type RG59U andthe like, an extension of the inner cable conductors l or l', respectively, may be inserted between the inner surface of the insulation 5 or 5 land the inner conductor l. or 1 of the other cable section, alongside and in contact with the inner conductor ll or l', as more particularly shown at 2 and 2 in Fig. 3. This solderless connection or engagement of the inner conductors 1 and 1 may be effected with the body il pushed back along one only of the cable sections A or B, after which the body 11 may be slid ove1 the connection, as illustrated in Fig. l.

Electrical connection between the outer and usually grounded conductors 5 and 5' of the cable sections A and B is effected, in accordance with the present invention, with the aid of staples or hasps 13 preferably U-shaped and of square cross-section, though other configurations may also be employed, as later explained. The arms 15 of the staples 13 are preferably pointed at their free ends and are separated or transversely spaced apart a distance greater than the diameter of the inner cable conductor 1 or i and less than the outer diameter of the coaxially disposed outer conductor 3 or 3 for a reason also later evident. The arms 15 of the staples 13 are received within correspondingly spaced pairs of apertures 17 on the surface of the body 1l, on opposite sides of the spliced cables A and B. Since the cable sections are held aligned Within the body 1l, the arms 15 of the staples 13 will symmetrically penetrate the outer conductors 3 and 3', as more particularly illustrated in Fig. 2, preferably embedding in the outer covering '7 at the bottom thereof. lf the arms l5 have at least portions of cross-dimension slightly larger than that of the openings i7, as when the openings i7' are substantially circular and the staple arms l5 are of appropriately dimensioned square cross-section, the arms l5 will bite into the material of the body il bounding the apertures i7 and lock therein as the staples i3 are inserted. Not only will excellent electrical con nection be thus simply and rapidly established between the outer conductors 3 and 3 of the cable sections A and B, but `a balanced and strong mechanical junction Will also be established.

For splicing cables of different diameter, such as A and B in Fig. 4, the conductive body may be formed in correspondingly shaped portions lll and 1l. The connector of Fig. 4 may be useful, for example, when splicing types RGllU and RG59U cable sections A' and B, respectively. Where an inner conductor extension 2 is not sufhciently rigid or otherwise appropriately adapted, moreover, a separate inner-conductor tapered connector plug may be provided, as at 20, Fig. 5, for insertion into the inner conductors l, i' of the cable sections A', B. This is of particular utility with type RGl 1U cables having multi-stranded inner conductors ll, 1.

The same connection construction may also be applied to other types of connections such as, for example, the terminating of a cable with an appropriate impedance R. The body lll. again receives the stapled cable A within the opening 9", Fig. 6, and the terminating-impedance R is received within a recess 25. The impedance R may be connected by inserting the terminal lead 22 thereof adjacent the cable inner conductor i, as before described, and wedging the other terminal lead 24 by a conductive pin 26 inserted within a transverse `aperture 28 in the body il that communicates with the interior recess 25.

ln Fig. 7, furthermore, a female connector may be pro vided, by inserting the extension 2 of the inner conductor l of the cable B through apertured transverse insulating spacers Sti, 32, as of Bakelite or the like. The spacers Bti and 32 may be held within the body 1li by dimples 27 therein, and the spacer 32 may support a contact cylinder il@ to which the inner conductor extension 2 may be connected in any desired manner. Again, as in the case of the other embodiments of the invention, the staple 13 secures the cable section B that is inserted within the body il.

Further modiiications will occur to those skilled in the art and all such vare considered to fall within the spirit and scope of the invention as defined in the appended claims.

What is claimed is:

l. A connector splicing two sections of a coaxial cable each having inner and outer conductors insulated from one another and an outer insulation covering, the connector comprising a conductive cylindrical body having openings at opposite ends receiving and aligning the two sections of cable and two longitudinally spaced pairs of apertures, the apertures of each pair being transversely spaced apart on the surface of the connector a distance greater than the diameter of the inner conductor and less than the outer diameter of the outer conductor o-f the corresponding section of cable, and a pair of U-shaped staples, one inserted within each pair of apertures, and each stapleV having at least a portion of the a-rms thereof of cross-dimension slightly larger than that of the apertures inserted within the apertures into the said outer insulation land outer conductor of the corresponding section of cable, the inner conductors of the cable sections engaging one another within the said body.

2. A connector splicing two sections of a coaxial cable each having inner and outer conductors insulated from one 'anothery and an outer insulation covering, the connector comprising a conductive cylindrical body having openings at opposite ends receiving and aligning the two sections of cable and two longitudinally spaced pairs of apertures, the apertures of each pair being transversely spaced apart on the surface of the connector a distance greater than the diameter of the inner conductor and less than the outer diameter of the outer conductor of the corresponding section of cable, and a pair of U-shaped staples, one inserted within each pair of apertures, and each staple having at least a portion of the arms thereof of cross-dimension slightly larger than that of the apertures inserted within the apertures into the said outer insulation and outer conductor of the corresponding section of cable, the inner conductor of at least one of the cable sections being inserted alongside the inner conductor of the' other cable section within the said body.

3. A connector splicing two sections of a coaxial cable each having inner and outer conductors insulated from one another and an outer insulation covering, the conhector comprising a conductive cylindrical body having openings` at' opposite ends receiving and aligning the two sectionsY of cable andl two longitudinally spaced pairs of apertures, the apertures of each pair being transversely spaced apart on the surface of the connector a distance greater than the diameter of the inner conductor and less than the4 outer diameter of the outer conductor of the correspon-ding section of cable and aY pair of U-shaped staples, one inserted within eachY pair of apertures, and each staple having at least a portion of the arms thereof of cross-'dimension slightly larger than that of the aperturesA inserted within the apertures into the said outer insulation and onter conducto-r of the corresponding sectionof cable, and' means for connecting the inner conductors of thev cable sections together within the said body.

4. A connector in combination with aV coaxial cable having innerY and outer conductors insulated from one another and an outer insulation covering, the connector comprising a conductive cylindrical body having anopening at one end receiving and aligning the cable and a pair of apertures transversely spaced apart on the surface of the connector a distance greater than the diameter of the inner conductor and less than the outer diameter of the outer conductor, and a staple having at least a portion of the arms thereof of cross-dimension slightly larger thanthat of the apertures locked within the same with the arms ofthe staple insertedwithin the apertures into the said outer insulation and outer conductor of the cable, the body having a recess for receiving a lineterminating impedance with one terminal of the impedance engaging the inner conductor of the cable within the body and means for connecting the other terminal of the impedance to the said body.

5. A connector as claimed in claim 4 and in which the last-named connecting means comprises a conductive piu wedged within a further aperture in the said body into contact with the said other terminal of the impedance.

6. A connector in combination with a coaxial cable having inner and outer conductors insulated from one another and an outer insulation covering, the connector comprising a conductive cylindrical body having an opening at one end receiving and aligning the cable and a pair of apertures transversely spaced apart on the surface of the connector a distance greater than the diameter of the inner conductor and less than the outer diameter of the outer conducto-r, and a staple having arms inserted within the apertures into the said outer insulation andI outer Conductor of the cable, the body having a recess for receiving a line-terminating impedance with one terminal of the impedance engaging the inner conductor of the cable within thebody andmeans for connecting the other terminal of the impedance to the said body.

7. A- connector in combination with a coaxial cable having inne-rv and' outer conductors insulated from one another and an outer insulation covering, the connector comprising a conductive cylindrical body having an opening at one end receiving and aligning the cable and a pair of apertures transversely spaced apartA on the surface of the connector a distance greater'than the diameter of the inner conductor and less than the outer diameter of the outer conductor, and a staple havingf at least a portionof the arms thereof of cross-dimension slightly larger thanthat of tlieapertures lockedA within the same with the of the-stapleinserted Within the apertures into the said outer insulation and outer conductor of the cable, the bo'dy havingv an apertured` transverse insulating spacer means supporting aninner-conductor contact member exposedat the other e'nd of the body, and means for securing the inner conductor of the cabley to the contaetfmember.

8. A connector in combination with a coaxial cable having inner and outer conductors insulated from one anotherand an outerinsulationcovering, the connector comprising a conductive cylindrical body having an openingV atf one end receiving and aligning the cable and a pair of apertures transversely spaced apart on the surfacev of theY cenn'ectora distance greater than the diameter of the inner conductor and lessthan the outer diameter of the outer conductor, and a staple having arms inserted within the apertures into the said: outer'insulat-ion and outer conduct'or `of the cable,- the body having an apertured trans# verse insulating spacer means supporting an inner-conductor contact member exposedvat theother endof the body, and means for securing the inner conductor of the cable to the contact member.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1949883 *Jul 5, 1929Mar 6, 1934Nat Electric Prod CorpJunction box of the floor type
US2389255 *Oct 22, 1941Nov 20, 1945Gen Cable CorpConnector
US2694183 *Sep 29, 1953Nov 9, 1954Diambra Henry MTap-off coupler with fixed attenuation for coaxial lines
US2755330 *May 11, 1951Jul 17, 1956Ludwig SidneyEnd structure for electrical conduit
US2839730 *Sep 15, 1954Jun 17, 1958Rca CorpTransmission line termination
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3194877 *Apr 9, 1963Jul 13, 1965Amp IncElectrical connector for connecting an electrical lead to the braid of a braid-shielded electrical cable
US3502788 *Jul 11, 1968Mar 24, 1970Bell Telephone Labor IncElectrical connectors for coaxial cables
US3599171 *Nov 21, 1968Aug 10, 1971Ford Motor CoIgnition cable connector
US3634601 *Mar 20, 1970Jan 11, 1972Amp IncStaking electrical contact and method of making an electrical connector
US3775706 *Apr 20, 1972Nov 27, 1973Us ArmyMetal inclosed resistor used as a stripline terminator
US4013333 *Sep 30, 1975Mar 22, 1977Chang Te HsingWire connector
US4127354 *Oct 12, 1977Nov 28, 1978Amp IncorporatedRebar securing device
US4387948 *Mar 3, 1981Jun 14, 1983Wells Manufacturing CorporationSpark plug wire terminal and method for attaching terminal
US4531049 *Nov 13, 1984Jul 23, 1985Junkosha Co., Ltd.Heating wire
US4533191 *Nov 21, 1983Aug 6, 1985Burndy CorporationIDC termination having means to adapt to various conductor sizes
US4533193 *Nov 21, 1983Aug 6, 1985Burndy CorporationIDC termination for coaxial cable having alignment & stabilizing means
US4614394 *Nov 28, 1984Sep 30, 1986Ing. C. Olivetti & C., S.P.A.Device for connecting a logic circuit to a coaxial cable
US4786760 *Oct 20, 1986Nov 22, 1988Raychem GmbhCable connection
US5330236 *Oct 2, 1992Jul 19, 1994Aerofit Products, Inc.Composite tube fitting
US6057510 *Sep 28, 1995May 2, 2000Siemens AktiengesellschaftInsulation displacement connection device and insulator element for bracing and centering an inner conductor in an outer conductor
DE4434702C1 *Sep 28, 1994Jan 18, 1996Siemens AgBlade contact connector for coaxial cable plug
EP0145407A2 *Nov 28, 1984Jun 19, 1985Ing. C. Olivetti & C., S.p.A.Device for connecting a logic circuit to a coaxial cable
WO1985002298A1 *Nov 20, 1984May 23, 1985Harry BlackwoodIdc termination for coaxial cable having alignment and stabilizing means
WO1985002300A1 *Nov 20, 1984May 23, 1985H BlackwoodIdc termination having means to adapt to various conductor sizes
WO1999043050A1 *Feb 15, 1999Aug 26, 1999Beppler WolfgangConnecting element for a coaxial cable
WO2008138292A1 *Apr 9, 2008Nov 20, 2008Spinner Gmbh ElektrotechMethod for permanent connection of a first rf coaxial cable to a second rf coaxial cable
Classifications
U.S. Classification174/88.00C, 333/22.00R, 174/75.00C, 439/284, 403/341, 403/393
International ClassificationH01R9/05, H01R4/50, H02G15/08, H01R13/646
Cooperative ClassificationH01R2103/00, H01R24/44, H02G15/085, H01R4/5033, H01R9/0503
European ClassificationH01R24/44, H02G15/08D, H01R9/05B, H01R4/50E