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Publication numberUS2971460 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 14, 1961
Filing dateMar 30, 1959
Priority dateMar 30, 1959
Publication numberUS 2971460 A, US 2971460A, US-A-2971460, US2971460 A, US2971460A
InventorsShindle George H
Original AssigneeShindle George H
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Method and apparatus for automatic temperature control of rotary printing press ink rollers
US 2971460 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

1961 I G. H. SHINDLE 2,971,460

METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR AUTOMATIC TEMPERATURE CONTROL OF ROTARY PRINTING PRESS INK ROLLERS Filed March 30, 1959 INVENTOR @fU/PZYE H SH/Wfilf 1 4k ATTORNEY ews e METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR AUTOMATIC TEMPERATURE CONTROL OF ROTARY PRINT- This invention relates to rotary web-fed printing presses, and is concerned with a method and apparatus for automatically maintaining ink rollers at a desired temperature, so as to secure better distribution and stabilization of. ink throughout the linking mechanism.

It is well known that an even temperature of inks in high speed, rotary, web-fed printing presses is essential for a fine quality of printing. Because of the fact that inks are all formulated at certain temperatures and also made for use at different press speeds, it is imperative to have automatic temperature control to keep the ink at its original consistency. Therefore, if inks are run at high press speed and excessive temperatures are built up in the ink rollers by friction, certain solvents and light oils used in the ink are apt to evaporate leaving only pigments on the web, thereby resulting in poor printing and the necessity for stopping the press in order to remix inks, with a consequent great loss of time and material.

' It is the main object of my invention to use beneficially at least a portion of the heat that is necessarily applied to the web for the purpose of drying the ink, which heat was previously not only wasted but required the wasting along with it of considerable .water for cooling purposes. Heretofore, the water passed through a heat absorbing roller disposed in contact with the web for cooling purposes was conducted to a drain as waste, but, in accordance with my invention, this outgoing warm water is utilized continuously to heat the ink rollers from the time the press is started, whereby to maintain a closely uniform ink temperature, regardless of inevitable changes in temperature of press parts due to heat of friction in operation, and thereby also avoid the necessity for providing extra electric or gas heaters for heating the ink rollers with all of the complications and added expense that such an addition to a press would involve.

My invention is hereinafter described by reference to the accompanying drawing, in which- Fig. 1 illustrates my improved temperature control designed to maintain a constant desired temperature of ink rollers in high speed, rotary, web-fed printing presses, and

Fig. 2 is a diagrammatic illustration of the rollers involved in one impression.

The same reference numerals are applied to corresponding parts in these views.

In Fig. 1 of the drawing, for simplicity, only one water cooled web cooling roller 4 is shown, also only one water heated ink roller 19, but it will be understood, this system may be used with whatever number of water cooled rollers 4 and water heated ink rollers 19 may be required on a printing press.

This invention, as above indicated, does not employ an outside means of heating water, such as a gas-fired means, electric means, steam coil or tank heater. The system is instead embodied in a printing press using a heated dryer or dryers, which are usually a part of a printing press for drying ink on the web as it passes through the dryer or dryers. Thus, the web in drying becomes heated and as the Web passes over the water-cooled roller 4 as it leaves the dryer to be cooled to set inks on the web, much of this heat is transferred from the web to the water-cooled roller 4 thereby heating the water passing through the roller. In accordance with the present invention, I use this method for heating the water which, in turn, heats the ink.

From the start-up of the printing press, cold water from source 1 flows through valve 2, which is normally open, through a monoflow rotary union 3, through the hollow shaft and journal into the water-cooled roller 4, which is located in the press at the outgoing side of a dryer D, as shown in Fig. 2. The web W (Fig. 2) passing through the suitably heated dryer D to dry ink runs over water cooled roller 4, thereby heating the water therein. The heated water flows from water cooled roller 4 through another journal and hollow shaft and through another monoflow rotary union 5 and valve 6, which is normally open, into a manifold 7, which contains a thermostatic bulb and capillary tube 8 connected to a thermostatic valve 9.

As the water flows through manifold 7 to thermostatic valve 9, which is normally closed, the flow is restricted by the valve. Thus, unless the water reaching valve 9 is hot enough, this valve stops the flow of water, causing water in water cooled roller 4 to heat up quickly. As water cannot flow on a cold start through thermostatic valve 9, the flow is then diverted through a restricted by-pass pipe 10 around valve 9 into pipe 11. The water is conducted by pipe 11 through check valve 13 into the thermostatic Wat-er mixing valve 14. As mixing valve 14 is normally open to hot water, the water flows through it into pipe header 15, which is connected to one or more water heated ink rollers 19. The water flows into each roller 19 from pipe header 15 through a throttling valve 16 through pipe 17 which is inserted through duoflow rotary union 18 and through a hollow shaft and journal and extends inside the roller 19 approximately two-thirds of the length thereof. The end of each ink roller 19 is closed when using a duoflow rotary union 18. The water flowing from pipe 17 into water heated ink roller 19 keeps it approximately half full, the excess water flowing out through the journal and hollow shaft into the duoflow rotary union 18 and out through discharge pipe header 20, which may also be connected to one or more other ink rollers, as indicated at 20a. The water finally flows from pipe header 20* into manifold 21 and then through pipe 23 to drain 24. This completes the flow of water from source 1 through by-pass pipe 10 and on through to drain 24 upon the initial startup of the printing press.

As the printing press continues to run for a short time, water flows through the system and becomes warmer from contact with water cooled roller 4. As warmer Water passes into manifold 7, the thermostatic bulb and capillary tube 8 connected to thermostatic valve 9 responds to the increase in temperature, which is indicated on thermometer 12, opening valve 9, which is set for a predetermined temperature. Thermostatic valve 9 will accordingly regulate water flow so as to maintain a desired temperature of the water flowing through pipe 11, check valve 13, thermostatic water mixing valve 14, pipe header 15, and throttling valve 16, into water heated ink roller 19 for the heating thereof. The water from ink roller 19 (and any other similarly heated ink rollers) is conducted by discharge pipe header 20 into manifold 21. As the thermostatic bulb and capillary tube 25 connected to thermostatic water mixing valve 14 responds to an increase in temperature, indicated by thermometer 22, valve 14, which is set for a predetermined temperature, admits cold water from source 1 through. valve 26, which is normally open, through check valve 27 to mix with the hot water delivered to header 15, whereby to avoid any likelihood of over-heating the water heated ink roller or rollers 19. V

In Fig. 2, the web to be printed upon is indicatedat W passing between plate cylinder 33 and packing cylinder 34. The printed web then passes through the suitably heated dryer D for drying of the ink, after which the web passes over the water cooled roller 4 for cooling of the web, this contact serving to transfer more than enough heat to the water in the roller 4 for heating the temperature controlled water heated ink roller or rollers 19, as described above. The web passes from roller 4 over another roller 35 to the next, impression in the press. Ink in fountain 36 wets roller 37 and is spread uniformly by contacting roller 38, which in turn coats contacting roller 39 uniformly, and that in turn inks the water heated roller 19 uniformly. Intermediate rubber form rollers 40 and 41 inked by roller 19 apply the ink uniformly to plate cylinder 33.

The following are safety features incorporated in the aforesaid system of my invention:

(1) There being a possibility that an excessive temperature might be buildt up by a combination of friction of ink rollers and high room temperatures, causing thermostatic water mixing valve 14 to close on hot water and open on cold water, which would cause excessive temperature in water cooled roller 4 and cause liming or scaling, to alleviate this condition, I have installed a pressure and temperature relief valve 29 on the incoming end of manifold 7. If the water pressure indicated on pressure gauge 28 increases above the initial water pressure from source 1 or the temperature in water cooled roller 4 increases over 15 degrees above the predeter mined setting of thermostatic valve 9, then relief valve 29 opens and water flows through pipe 30 to drain 31.

(2) In the event that the thermostatic valve 9 fails to function properly, the printing press can still be kept in operation by closing valve 6 to manifold 7 and opening valve 32 to pipe 30 and by-passing water to drain 31.

In conclusion, it should be clear from the foregoing:

(a) That water can be heated in a printing press using the heat found in the web as it leaves the dryers, by running the hot web over water cooled rollers, and conducting the water so heated through thermostatic valves into water heated ink rollers, thereby causing these rollers to be heated at once from a cold start; 7

(b) That when ink rollers are so heated, the temperature can be held almost constant as the flow of hot water from the water cooled roller source is blended with cold water from another source'through a thermostatically controlled water mixing valve; 7

(c) That all of the ink rollers from fountain to cylinder will maintain an even temperature from one end to the other, heating and cooling being transmitted from one metallic periphery roller to another by metal to metal rolling contact;

(d) That because all of the metallic periphery ink rollers are maintained at a constant temperature, inks flow from the fountain to the rollers at an even consistency and with good distribution throughout the inking mechanism from fountain to plate cylinder;

(e) Due to the uniform distribution and consistency of inks obtained by the present improved system of temperature control, ink Will not dry on rollers, and there is no separating out of light solvents or oils from the ink, and, finally,

(1) Due to the even distribution and stabilization of inks obtained with my improved system of temperature control, the ink is assured of even drying, and all inks (colors and blacks) retain their full body and brilliancy, which are so necessary for a good quality of printing.

It is believed the foregoing description conveys a good understanding of the objects and advantages of my invention. The appended claims have been drawn to cover all legitimate modifications and adaptations.

I claim:

1. The method herein described of heating ink in a rotary, web-fed printing press, wherein the web is subjected to heating for drying of the ink thereon, which method consists in passing a liquid coolant through a device for cooling the web after its passage through the dryer, circulating said liquid coolant so heated in heat transfer relationship to the ink before its application to the web in the printing .operation, and regulating the temperature of the heated coolant by mixture therewith of unheated coolant before it comes into heat transfer relationship with the ink to be heated thereby.

2. The method herein described of heating ink in a rotary, web-fed printing press, wherein the web is subjected to heating for drying of the ink thereon, which method consists in passing a liquid coolant through a roller running in cooling contact with the web while still heated after passage through the dryer, circulating the liquid coolant so heated through an inking roller in heat transfer relationship to the ink before its application to the web in the printing operation, and regulating the temperature of the heated coolant by mixture therewith of unheated coolant before it enters the inking roller.

3. The method herein described of heating ink in a rotary web-fed printing press, wherein the web is subjected to heating for drying of the ink thereon, which method consists in passing a liquid coolant through a roller running in cooling contact with the Web while still heated after passage through the dryer, circulating the liquid coolant so heated through at least one of the group of inking rollers between the ink fountain and plate cylinder having a metallic periphery, whereby to distribute the heating effect to all of the metallic periphery ink rollers by conduction from one to another by metal to metal rolling contact and, accordingly, heat the ink throughout its passage from the fountain to the-plate cylinder, and regulating the temperature of the heated coolant by mixture therewith of unheated coolant before it enters the inking roller.

4. In a rotary web-fed printing press having a plate cylinder and a heated dryer through which the printed Web is passed for drying of the ink, the combination with the inking mechanism for the plate cylinder of web cooling meanshaving a coolant circulated therethrough, ink heating means for said inking mechanism through which the coolant heated by the web is circulated, and means for mixing with the heated coolant, unheated coolant before circulation through the ink heating means to regulate the heating effect on the ink.

5. In a rotary web-fed printing press having a plate cylinder and a heated dryer through which the printed. Web is passed for drying of the ink, the combination with a hollow inking roller operatively associated with the plate cylinder for applying ink thereto, of a hollow web-cooling roller disposed in rolling contact with the web while hot from the dryer, means for circulating a liquid coolant through the web-cooling roller and then through the inking roller, and means for mixing with the heated coolant unheated coolant before circulation through the inking roller to regulate the heating effect on the ink.

6. In a rotary web-fed printing press having a plate cylinder, and an ink fountain, and a heated dryer through which the printed web is passed for drying of the ink, the combination with a series of inking rollers in rolling contact with one another between the plate cylinder and ink fountain, each roller having a metallic periphery, at least one of said rollers being hollow, of a hollow web cooling roller disposed in rolling contact with the web while the same is hot from the dryer, means for circulat-.

in said series of inking rollers, and means for mixing with the heated coolant unheated coolant before circulation through the inking roller to regulate the heating effect on the ink.

7. In a rotary, web-fed printing press having a plate cylinder and a heated dryer through which the printed web is passed for drying of the ink, the combination with a hollow inking roller operatively associated with the plate cylinder for applying ink thereto, of a hollow Web-cooling roller disposed in rolling contact with the web while hot from the dryer, a source of cooling water under pressure supplying water to said roller for cooling, conduit means conducting the water thus heated from the web cooling roller into the inking roller, a thermo static valve responsive to the heating of the Water for regulating water flow through said conduit means, and means providing a restricted bypass around said valve in said conduit means.

8. In a rotary, web-fed printing press having a plate cylinder and a heated dryer through which the printed web is passed for drying of the ink, the combination with a hollow inking roller operatively associated with the plate cylinder for applying ink thereto, of a hollow Web-cooling roller disposed in rolling contact with the web while hot from the dryer, a source of cooling water under pressure supplying Water to said roller for cooling, conduit means conducting the water thus heated from the web cooling roller into the inking roller, and a thermostatic valve responsive to the heating of the Water for regulating water flow through said conduit means.

9. A printing press combination as set forth in claim 8 including a thermostatic mixing valve in said conduit means having connection with the aforesaid source, whereby to mix unheated coolant with the heated coolant to maintain the coolant entering the inking roller at a predetermined temperature.

10. A printing press combination as set forth in claim 8 including a second thermostatic valve between the web cooling roller and the first mentioned thermostatic valve adapted to open in the event the coolant attains excessive temperature, said second thermostatic valve allowing escape of the overly heated coolant to a drain.

11. A printing press combination as set forth in claim 10 including a manual shut-off valve in the conduit means between the web cooling roller and the second thermostatic valve, a conduit providing a bypass around said second thermostatic valve from said conduit means to the drain from the web cooling roller, and a manual shutoff valve in said bypass conduit.

12. In a rotary, web-fed printing press having a plate cylinder and a heated dryer through which the printed web is passed for drying of the ink, the combination with a hollow inking roller operatively associated with the plate cylinder for applying ink thereto, of a hollow web-cooling roller disposed in rolling contact with the web while hot from the dryer, a source of cooling water under pressure supplying water to said roller for cooling, conduit means conducting the water thus heated from the web cooling roller to a header adapted to be connected with a plurality of inking rollers in parallel, at least the one aforesaid inking roller being supplied with heated coolant from said header, and a thermostatic valve responsive to the heating of the water for regulating water flow through said conduit means.

13. A printing press combination as set forth in claim 12 including a thermostatic mixing valve having connection with the aforesaid source and connecting said header with said conduit means, whereby to mix unheated coolant with the heated coolant to maintain the coolant entering the inking roller at a predetermined temperature.

14. A printing press combination as set forth in claim 12 including a second thermostatic valve between the web cooling roller and the first mentioned thermostatic valve adapted to open in the event the coolant attains excessive temperature, said second thermostatic valve allowing escape of the overly heated coolant to a drain.

15. A printing press combination as set forth in claim 14 including a manual shut-off valve in the conduit means between the web cooling roller and the second thermostatic valve, a conduit providing a. bypass around said second thermostatic valve from said conduit means to the drain from the web cooling roller, and a manual shut-off valve in said bypass conduit.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,261,885 Wood et a1. Apr. 9, 1918 1,831,624 Francoise Nov. 10, 1931 2,089,524 Abrams et a1 Aug. 10, 1937 2,127,956 Helmer Aug. 23, 1938 2,329,152 Breyer Sept. 7, 1943 2,396,946 Grupe Mar. 19, 1946 2,797,068 McFarlan June 25, 1957

Patent Citations
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3956986 *Dec 4, 1974May 18, 1976Roland Offsetmaschinenfabrik Faber & Schleicher AgInking system for printing machines
US4290363 *Apr 30, 1980Sep 22, 1981M.A.N.-Roland Druckmaschinen AktiengesellschaftInking system for a printing machine
US4627349 *May 2, 1985Dec 9, 1986Claussen Gary JHeated inking roll for a printer
US4638851 *Apr 11, 1985Jan 27, 1987Mitsubishi Jukogyo Kabushiki KaishaCooling apparatus for metal strip
US4879951 *Oct 19, 1988Nov 14, 1989Kabushikigaisha Tokyo Kikai SeisakushoInk supplying device
US5074213 *Nov 30, 1989Dec 24, 1991Seiichi KurosawaThermoregulator of a block cylinder used for an offset press
US5178064 *Oct 8, 1991Jan 12, 1993Man Roland Druckmasachinen AgThermal regulator for a printing form laid about a printing form cylinder for anaqueous offset printing
US5189960 *Nov 18, 1991Mar 2, 1993Fredric ValentiniApparatus and method for controlling temperature of printing plate on cylinder in rotary press
US5207158 *Feb 19, 1991May 4, 1993Rockwell InternationalLong lived, variable-delivery ink metering method, system and roller for keyless lithography
US5218905 *Mar 18, 1992Jun 15, 1993Karl H. Sengewald Gmbh & Co.Printing assembly with individual zonal temperature control
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US5507229 *Mar 4, 1994Apr 16, 1996Windmoller & HolscherPrinting press
US5592882 *Dec 12, 1995Jan 14, 1997Komori CorporationPrinting press bearing and method of controlling temperature of bearings of a printing press
US5603261 *Mar 8, 1996Feb 18, 1997Tri Service, Inc.Water distribution system in an ink flow temperature control system of a printing press arrangement
US5606914 *Jul 29, 1994Mar 4, 1997Cleanpack Gmbh Innovative VerpackungenProcess and device for printing sheeting in rotary offset press
US5611278 *Oct 11, 1995Mar 18, 1997Sun Graphic Technologies, Inc.Temperature controlled system for printing press
US5823108 *Jan 29, 1996Oct 20, 1998Heidelberger Druckmaschinen AgDevice for stabilizing the temperature of a duct roller in an inking unit of a printing press
US6505557 *Jul 22, 1999Jan 14, 2003Ted DesaulniersProcess temperature control system for rotary process machinery
US6637337 *Aug 23, 2001Oct 28, 2003Heidelberger Druckmaschinen AgMethod for controlling the temperature of printing form surfaces during printing
DE19510797A1 *Mar 24, 1995Sep 26, 1996Roland Man DruckmaschTemperierbarer zylindrischer Rotationskörper
DE102004005602A1 *Feb 5, 2004Sep 1, 2005Man Roland Druckmaschinen AgStart and stop operation of printing machine, involves changing starting characteristics diagram using correction factor calculated from detected surface temperature of printing roller or cylinder
DE102004005602B4 *Feb 5, 2004Nov 6, 2008Manroland AgVerfahren zum Hochfahren und Stoppen von Druckmaschinen
WO1993009951A1 *Nov 16, 1992May 27, 1993Tri Service IncTemperature control of printing plate on cylinder
Classifications
U.S. Classification101/424.2, 101/348, 165/104.32, 165/89, 165/278, 101/487
International ClassificationB41F31/00
Cooperative ClassificationB41F31/002
European ClassificationB41F31/00C