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Publication numberUS2971470 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 14, 1961
Filing dateAug 3, 1955
Priority dateAug 3, 1955
Publication numberUS 2971470 A, US 2971470A, US-A-2971470, US2971470 A, US2971470A
InventorsWein John F, Wendell Samuel I
Original AssigneeStewart Warner Corp
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Constant pressure pumping apparatus
US 2971470 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
Previous page
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Feb. 14, 1961 J, F, WEm ETAL 2,971,470

CONSTANT PRESSURE PUMPING APPARATUS Filed Aug. 3, 1955 United States l CONSTANT PRESSURE PUMPING APPARATUS .lohn F. Wein and Samuel I. Wendell, Indianapolis, Ind., assignors to Stewart-Warner Corporation, Chicago, lll., a corporation of Virginia Filed Aug. 3, 1955, Ser. No. 526,100

8 Claims. (Cl. 103-150) The present invention relates to liuid pumping apparatus, and particularly to pumps suited for supplying fuel to combustion heaters or the like.

One object of the invention is to provide an improved pump assembly capable of supplying iiuid at a regulated output pressure by means of a highly simplified yet durable pumping structure.

Another object is to provide a fluid pump of exceptionally economical construction capable of operating dependably over a long useful life.

Other objects and advantages will become apparent from the following description of the form of the invention shown in the drawing in which:

Figure 1 is a side view of pumping apparatus incorporating the invention, certain parts being broken away for clearness in illustration;

Fig. 2 is a sectional view taken generally along line 2-2 of Fig. 1 and showing the connection of inlet and outlet lines to the apparatus; and `Fig. 3 is a detail view showing the lower side of the pumping diaphragm.

As shown, the apparatus comprises a central body or casing section formed as a generally rectangular casting. The lower side of the body is centrally recessed to form a downwardly facing concave surface defining a cavity 14, Fig. 2. The lower side of this cavity is covered by a rectangular diaphragm 16 of a synthetic rubber, preferably Buna N, thus forming a pumping chamber (also denoted by the numeral 14). The marginal edge of the diaphragm 16 is held by a centrally apertured plate 18 tightly against a fiat surface 20 on the body 10 and protected by a flange 22 extending downwardly from the body into engagement with the plate. A raised bead 24 integral with the peripheral edge of the diaphragm locks into a rectangular groove Z6 formed in the body 10 at the outer edge of the surface 20.

A shallow working clearance 28 is provided between the portion of the diaphragm 16 covering the cavity 14 and the plate 1S by relieving the opposed upper surface of the plate. A relatively narrow, rectangular opening 30 cut through the central portion of the plate 18 receives a T-shaped connecting head 32 extending downwardly from `the central portion of the diaphragm 16.

The T-shaped head 32` is formed on the lower end of a tapered base 36 integral with the fiat body portion 37 of the diaphragm 16. The base 36 is elongated rectangularly in the same direction as the diaphragm body 37. See Fig. 3.

p The connecting head 32 and its base 36 as well as the main portion of the diaphragm 16 `integral with the base are fashioned from Buna N or an equivalent material.

The diaphragm is formed in a manner such that the body portion 37 of the diaphragm extending from the base 36 is relatively exible, having a hardness of the order of 35 to 45 durometer. The head 32 `and base 36 have` a greater hardness, approximately 70 to 80 durometer.

Thelconnecting head 32 depends into a lower casing section 38 held tightly against the lower side of the plate ICO 18 by four assembly screws 40, Figs. 1 and 2, extending downwardly through a cap 42 on the top side of the body 10 and through the body 10, passing through four holes 44 in the diaphragm 16, as shown :in Fig. 3.

Two horizontally spaced bearings 46 mounted in the lower casing section 38, Fig. 1, in axial alinement with each other support a horizontal operating shaft 48 below the connecting head 32 on the pumping diaphragm 16. An operating cam 50 eccentrically formed on the shaft 48 between the bearings 46 is encircled by a cylindrical cam follower 52 having a fiattened top portion 54 which abuts against the flat underside of the connecting head 32, Fig. 2. Two legs 56 extending upwardly from opposite sides of the cam follower 52 straddle the connecting head 32 longitudinally along the latter, forming a yoke-like connection with the T-shaped head 32. The respective legs 56 define two toes or lugs 58 fitting closely over opposite ends of the head and abutting snugly against the sloping ends of the tapered base 36.

Two brackets 60 on the lower casing section 38 are adapted to mount the assembly on a power source (not shown), such as an internal combustion engine. The drive shaft 48 can be connected to rotating parts of the engine in any suitable manner.

Liquid in a line 62 leading, for example, from a gasoline tank (not shown) is supplied to the pumping charnber 14 through an elbow fitting 64 threaded into an enlarged bore 65 in the body 10, an inlet valve 66 in the bore 65, and an L-shaped bore 68 extending from the valve to the pumping chamber.

The inlet valve 66 itself is separately fashioned as a self-contained cartridge inserted in the bore 65 ahead of the fitting 64 and held against an apertured seal 70 `on the bottom of the bore 65 by a compression spring 72 interposed between the valve and the fitting. As shown, the valve comprises an apertured disc 74 fitted into the outer end of a counterbored sleeve 76 and secured in place by crimping the adjacent marginal edge of the sleeve. A valve disc 78 is pressed against the downstream face of the disc 74 by a light compression spring 80 contained within the sleeve 76.

Fluid is pumped from the chamber 14 out through a bore 82, a discharge check valve 84 mounted in an outlet bore 85 connecting with the bore 82, and a fitting 86 threaded into the body 10 and connected with a line 88 leading to a combustion heater or the like (not shown). Structurally the discharge check valve 84 is similar to the inlet check valve 66, the discharge valve being reversed end for end to permit one-way ow of fluid from the pumping chamber 14. The mountings for the two valves 66 and 84 in the two bores 65 and 85 are similar.

The upper side of the body 10 is shaped to form a rather deep, upwardly` open recess connected at its lower end to the outlet bore 85 through a bore and slot passageway 92 communicating with the outlet bore at the downstream side of the valve 84. The upper end of the recess 90 is covered by a flexible diaphragm 94 held in place by the cap 42.

Thus covered, the recess 90 forms-a regulator chamber which upon operation of the pump assembly is filled with fiuid at the outlet pressure of the pumping chamber 14. The force of uid pressure acting on the underside of the diaphragm 94 is opposed by a compression spring 96 engaging a spring seat 98 on the upper side of the diaphragm 94 and extending upwardly into a downwardly open adjusting screw 100 threaded into the cap 42.

Vertical movement of the regulator diaphragm 94 in Aopposition to the spring 96 controls a relief valve 102 Patented Felb. 14, 1961 wardly into interconnected exhaust bores 112 in the body leading into the bore 65 at the upstream side of the inlet valve 66.

In the operation of the pumping assembly thus formed, the diaphragm 16 is positively reciprocated (with some lateral llexure) by tne eccentric cam 50 connected to the-diaphragm through the follower 52 and the connecting head 32. Fluid is drawn into the pumping chamber 14 through the inlet valve 66 and forced out through thedischarge valve 84 under increased pressure.

' The positively operating pump thus formed is quite simple structurally, comprisingressentially inlet and discharge valves, a rubber diaphragm, a cam actuator and a cam follower connected to the diaphragm by means of a rubber connecting head integral with the diaphragm. There is no need to reinforce the pumping diaphragm by separate reinforcing discs or the like. A sturdy connection between the cam follower and the connecting head transmits to the diapnragm reversing forces for positively lreciprocating the diaphragm in opposite directions over a longservice life.

The output pressure of theV pump is prevented from exceeding an adjustable predetermined level by opening of the relief valve 102 by the pressure responsive actuator structure connected to the downstream side of the pump outlet valve 84. Regulation of the controlled output pressure of the pump requires merely a simple adjustment ofthe screw 100 to vary the stress on the spring 96. The pumping assembly thus provided is capable of producing a highly satisfactory and dependable pumping action throughout a long service life.

Y The word irregular in the claims as applied to the surfaces of the head of the diaphragm extension and the mating portion of the pump actuator refers to a peripheral surface having a cross-section which is nonuniform. That is the surface is not parallel with the directionv of motion.

While we have shown and described a preferred embodiment of our invention, it will be apparent that variations and modifications thereof may be made without departingfrom the principles and scope of the invention. We therefore desire, by the following claims, to include all such variations and modifications by which substantially the results of our invention may be obtained through the use of substantially the same or equivalent means.

We claim:

1. In a fluid pump of the type in which a substantially flat diaphragm of rubberlike material reciprocates in a pumping chamber to draw liuid from a source into the chamber by Way of an inlet check valve and to expel the fiuid from the chamber by way of an outlet check valve, the combination with the diaphragm of an actuator assembly comprising a thickened central portion on one side of the diaphragm forming a connecting base extending away from the pumping chamber, a connecting head integrally formed on the outer end of the base and extending away from the pumping chamber the head defining an irregularly shaped surface in the direction extending away fromthe chamber in the line of movement of said diaphragm, the connecting head and base being formed of the same rubberlike material as the diap hragm and hardened to a degree greater than the hardness of the portion of the diaphragm encircling the base, and a'reciprocable actuator defining a corresponding irregular surface4 embracing the headV andV engaging said 44 connecting base to impart reciprocable pumping motion thereto.

2. In a fiuid pump of the type in which a substantially fiat diaphragm of rubberlike material reciprocates in a pumping chamber to draw iiuid from a source into the chamber by way of an inlet check valve and to expel the fluid from the chamber by way of an outlet check valve, the combination with the diaphragm of an actuator assembly comprising a thickened central portion on one side of the diaphragm forming a connecting base extending away from the pumping chamber, a T-shaped connecting head integrally formed on the outer end of the base and extending awayV fromV the pumping chamber, the connecting head and base being formed of the same rubberlike material as the diaphragm and hardened to a degree greater than the hardness of the portion of the diaphragm encircling the base, and a reciprocable actuator defining a T-shaped recess, embracingthe T- shaped head andengaging said connecting base; to impart reciprocable pumpinglmotion thereto.

3. In a fluid pump ofthe type in which a substantially fiat diaphragm of rubberlike material reciprocates in a pumping chamber` to draw liuid from a source into the chamber by way of an inlet check valve and to expel the liuid from the-chamber by way of'an outlet check valve, the combination with the diaphragm of an actuator assembly comprising a thickened central diaphragm portion forming a tapered connecting base on one side of the diaphragm and extending away from the chamber, an irregularly shaped extension of the connecting base defining a connecting head at the outer end of the tapered base, a reciprocable pump actuator including a pair of spaced legs formed to embrace the connecting head and to firmly engage the tapered base for imparting reciprocable pumping motion to the diaphragm.

4. In a fiuid pump of the type in which a substantially fiat diaphragm of rubberlike material reciprocates' in a pumping chamber to draw liuid from a source into the chamber by way of an inlet check valve and to expel the fluid from the chamber by way of `an outlet check valve, the combination with the diaphragm of an actuator assembly comprising a thickened central diaphragm por-` tion forming a tapered connecting base on one side of the diaphragm and extending away from the chamber, an extension of the connecting base defining a T-shaped connecting head at the outer end of the tapered base, a reciprocable pump' actuator Yincluding a pair of spaced legs formed to embrace the connecting head and to firmly engage the tapered base for imparting reciprocable pumping motion to the diaphragm.

5. The combination claimed in claim 4 wherein the connecting head and base are formed of the same rubberlike material as the diaphragm and hardened to a degree greater than the hardness of the portion ofthe diaphragm encircling the base.

6. For use in a fiuid pump, a reciprocable diaphragm and actuatorV assembly comprising a substantially at diaphragm body formed of a hardenable rubberlike material, the central portion of they diaphragm body being thickened to form a tapered connecting base integral with one side of the diaphragm body and extending laterally therefrom, an irregularly shaped connecting head integrally formed on the outer end of the tapered base and extending away from the diaphragm body, the connecting head and the tapered base being formed of the same `material as the diaphragm body and hardened to a'degree greater than the hardness of the diaphragm body surrounding the base, a reciprocable pump actuator defining a corresponding irregular surface embracing the head and firmly engaging the tapered base to impart reciprocable pumping motion to the diaphragm.

7. For use in a fluid pump, a reciprocable-diaphragm and actuator assembly comprising a substantially fiat diaphragm body formed 4of a hardenable rubbermaterial, the central portion of. the diaphragm body beingthickened to form a tapered connecting base integral with one side of the diaphragm body and extending laterally therefrom, a T-shaped connecting head integrally formed on the outer end of the tapered base and extending away from the diaphragm body, the T-shaped connecting head and the tapered base being formed of the same material as the diaphragm body and hardened to a degree greater than the hardness of the diaphragm body surrounding the base, a reciprocable pump actuator defining a T-shaped slot receiving and embracing the T-shaped head and the tapered base to impart reciprocable pumping motion to the diaphragm.

8. For use in a iluid pump, a reciprocable diaphragm and actuator assembly comprising a substantially ilat diaphragm body formed of a hardenable rubber material, the central portion of the diaphragm body being thickened to form a tapered connecting base integral with one side of the diaphragm body and extending laterally therefrom, a T-shaped connecting head integrally formed on the outer end of the tapered base and extending away from the diaphragm body, the T-shaped connecting head and the tapered base being formed of the same material as the diaphragm body and hardened to a degree greater than the hardness of the diaphragmbody surrounding the base, a rotary cam operator mounted in transverse relation to the connecting head, a reciprocable cam follower carried by the operator and including a pair of spaced legs embracing the T-shaped head and iirmly engaging the tapered base to impart reciprocable pumping motion to the diaphragm.

References Cited in the le of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,610,950 Johnston Dec. 14, 1926 2,191,458 Duden Feb. 27, 1940 2,267,280 Kuhnel Dec. 23, 1941 2,415,060 Craig Jan. 28, 1947 2,575,398 Schroeder Nov. 20, 1951 2,641,283 Houston June 9, 1953 2,642,090 Barr June 16, 1953 2,645,414 Maierhofer July 14, 1953 2,658,526 Porter Nov. 10, 1953 2,685,304 Wright Aug. 3, 1954 2,690,295 Rand Sept. 28, 1954 2,782,719 Georgias Feb. 26, 1957 FOREIGN PATENTS 113,019 Switzerland Dec. 16, 1925 463,671 Great Britain Apr. 5, 1937

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3124959 *Jul 19, 1960Mar 17, 1964 Primary differential pressure sensing
US3138169 *Jun 13, 1961Jun 23, 1964Symington Wayne CorpValve arrangement for pump
US3306214 *Mar 2, 1964Feb 28, 1967Gen Motors CorpPressure control
US3849032 *Jul 2, 1973Nov 19, 1974Perfect Pump CoHigh pressure reciprocating pump
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Classifications
U.S. Classification417/568, 137/454.4, 92/101, 92/103.00R, 417/566
International ClassificationF04B49/22, F04B43/02, F04B49/24, F04B43/00
Cooperative ClassificationF04B43/0054, F04B43/02, F04B49/24
European ClassificationF04B43/02, F04B49/24, F04B43/00D8