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Publication numberUS2971680 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 14, 1961
Filing dateMay 27, 1957
Priority dateMay 27, 1957
Publication numberUS 2971680 A, US 2971680A, US-A-2971680, US2971680 A, US2971680A
InventorsMalick Dell M, Wilson Woodrow S
Original AssigneeMalick Dell M, Wilson Woodrow S
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Dispensing caps
US 2971680 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Feb. 14, 1961 w. 5. WILSON ETAL 2,971,680

DISPENSING CAPS Filed May 27. 1957 III m:

90 DELL. M. MAL/L76,

VVoaDkoW W /1. $0M,

INVENTORS.

' the prior dispensing cap structures.

United States Patent Q DISPENSING CAPS Woodrow S. Wilson, 1970 N. Altadena Blvd., Pasadena, Calif., and Dell M. Malick, 725 N. Pickering Ave., Whittier, Calif.

Filed May 27, 1957, Ser. No. 661,679

6 Claims. (Cl. 222-512) This invention relates to new and improved dispensing caps.

The term dispensing caps is employed in this specification in order to designate various types of cap structures which may be manipulated so as to achieve either an open or closed action. Such cap structures are primarily designed to be used with various containers such as, for example, squeeze bottles, tubes or the like, for various liquid or semi-liquid or even paste-like preparations. Thus, dispensing caps of the present invention may be employed with such diverse types of material as various petroleum fractions, cosmetic creams, suntan lotions, detergents or the like.

Virtually anyone familiar with the container industry has personal knowledge of a wide variety of dilterent types of dispensing caps which are presently on the market. Virtually anyone in this industry also has knowledge of the fact that literally hundreds, if not thousands of different types of dispensing caps, as the term is employed in this specification, have been developed in the past. It is considered impossible to discuss all of these various types of prior structures and the various disadvantages and limitations of them. The fact that there is still a market for a new and improved dispensing cap is considered evidence enough that the prior structures of this type have not been considered to be completely satisfactory for all purposes.

With the comparatively recent development of injection molding techniques utilizing various thermoplastic materials such as common grades polyethylene, a number of new dispensing cap structures have been developed. Certain of these structures may be considered more or less acceptable for many purposes; however, all of these new dispensing cap structures formed out of thermoplastic materials by injection molding techniques are considered to suiier' from one or more inherent disadvantages for-comrnercial purposes, because of either the types of construction employed, molding problems, problems pertaining to commercial adaptability and availability, or various other like factors.

A broad object of the present invention is to provide new and dispensing caps which overcome many, if not all, of the aforegoing disadvantages and limitations of Another object of this invention is to provide dispensing cap structures which may be easily and conveniently manufactured by injection molding techniques out of thermoplastic materials having an inherent amount of resiliency. Thus, the present invention has as one of its objects the production of dispensing caps of the polyethylene and various other thermoplastic materials having similar or substantially identical properties to polyethylene. A still further object of the present invention is to provide dispensing cap structures which are 'easy to'assemble after the various parts of these structures have been molded. An object of the present invention is also to provide dispensing cap structures which may be used with existing machines for placing caps on various types of containers. Obvious- "ice ly, another object of the present invention is to provide dispensing cap structures in which an effective sealing action is easily and conveniently obtained.

Because of the nature of this invention, it is not considered necessary to set forth in detail a still further long list of various objects and advantages of the invention. Other objects and advantages of the dispensing cap structures of this invention will be fully apparent to those skilled in the art to which this invention pertains from a detailed consideration of the remainder of this description, including the appended claims and the accompanying drawing in which:

Fig. 1 is a perspective view of a dispensing cap of of this invention;

Fig. 6 is a cross-sectional view taken at line 6 6 of Fig. 5;

Fig. 7 is a cross-sectional view taken at line 7-7 of Fig. 5;

Fig. 8 is a top plan view similar to Fig. 5 of a further modified dispensing cap of this invention; and

Fig. 9 is a cross-sectional view taken at line 9-9 of Fig. 8.

In the various figures of the drawing, like numerals are used to designate like parts Wherever convenient for purposes of illustration and explanation. It is to be understood that the accompanying drawing is not to be taken as limiting this invention in any respect. Those skilled in the art to which this invention pertains will realize that a wide variety of diiierently and/ or diversely appearing dispensing cap structures utilizing the essential features or principles of this invention as hereinafter set forth and explained may be readily designed without the exercise of inventive skill.

As an aid to understanding the invention, it may be stated in essentially summary form that it concerns dispensing cap structures each of which includes a cap member and a spout; The cap member employed in a dispensing cap of this invention is formed so as to include a top, and a groove is located Within this top, and overhanging shoulders or arms are provided which overlay the groove. The purpose of these shoulders is to hold a spout structure within the groove so as to securely form a seal between the spout structure and a hole located within the top of the cap leading from the bottom of the groove. With this type of construction, the spout may be moved in a reciprocal manner within the groove so as to either open or close a dispensing cap structure.

The actual details of this invention are best more fully explained by referring directly to the accompanying drawing. In Figs. 1, 2 and 3 of the drawing there is shown a complete dispensing cap 10 of the present invention which includes a cap member 12 formed as a single piece by appropriate injection molding or other similar techniques using conventional polyethylene or other materials of a somewhat resilient nature having substantially the same properties. This cap member 12 is built about a top 14 and a dependent peripheral skirt 16, the interior of which may be threaded in accordance with conventional practices. If desired, the threads within the skirt 16 may, of course, be replaced by conventional snap ring, or if desired, the skirt 16 may be formed integrally with the top of the container, such as, for example, a polyethylene tube or the like.

The structure of the top 14 of the cap member 12 is considered important with this invention, This top 14 is formed so as to include what may be considered a top groove 18 having a flat bottom 20; from the center of this bottom 20, there extends a hole 22 into the' interior of the skirt 16. Around the outside of this hole upon the bottom 20 there is formed as an integral part of the cap member 12 a small ring-like ridge 24. This ridge preferably has the cross-sectional shape of a common V, and is normally deformed by contact with a spout 2-5 so as to maintain a seal at all times.

From a consideration of Figs. 1, 2 and 3 of the drawing it will be seen that the spout 26 includes a flat bottom 23, as shown which normally rests against the bottom 20 and which serves partially to deform the ridge 24 as indicated. The bottom 23 or the spout 26 is held against the bottom 2% of the groove 13 by means of resilient arms or shoulders 30' bearing against tapered sides 32 of the spout 26. In essence the arms 3t) act as spring means so as to firmly hold the spout 26. in position at all times, even as this spout is moved. It will be noted from an examination of the initial three figures of the drawing the spout 26 includes a projecting top ridge 34 which is preferably knurled or serrated or the like so as to facilitate moving the spout 26 back and forth. As shown in the drawings this spout 26 is in a closed position.

In order to open the dispensing cap 19, the spout 26 is moved to the right as viewed in Fig. 3 of the drawings so as to bring the ridge 34 up against extensions 36 on the arms '39. These extensions as are formed integrally with the cap member 12 in the illustrated embodiment of the invention. They serve in order to stop the motion of the spout 26 in such a manner that a passage 33 within the spout 26 is in communication with the hole 22. it will be realized that when the spout 26 is in this open position, this spout extends from the skirt 16 a short distance, so as to be capable of being conveniently used in dispensing the contents of a container to which the cap it is attached.

When the spout 26 is in an open position as shown, another hole 40 formed so as to lead from the bottom 2% of the groove 13 to the interior of the skirt 16 is uncovered. As seen in Fig. 3 of the drawings, this other hole 46 is also surrounded within the bottom 20 of the groove 13 by another ridge 42 similar'to the ridge 24 previously described. This other ridge 42 also serves substantially as in the same manner as the ridge 24. When the other hole 4%) is uncovered, as by movement of the spout 26 to an open position, this other hole permits airto enter a container upon which the dispensing cap 19 is used so as to facilitate pouring from this container. As is apparent from Fig. 3 of the drawing, the other hole it) isclosed by the spout as when this spout is in a closed position. Obviously this other hole 40 and the ridge 42 may be omitted if desired. This other hole 4-1 is normally employed with only certain types of fluids which are capable of being easily poured.

A small bump like projection 44, formed integrally with the cap member 12 serves to hold the spout 26 against movement away from the cap member 12 when the 'spout 25 is being moved to a closed position. It is considered obvious that the projection 44 and the extensions 35 may be literally popped or bent out of the Way so as to permit comparativel easy insert of the spout 26 in the position shown. Preferably the spout 26 is formed out of a material such as polyethylene or the like so as to be capable of giving slightly in order to aid in forming a seal with the cap member 12. If desired, however, the spout 26 may be formed out of a more rigid material, such as for example polystyrene or the like.

In Figs. 5, 6 and 7 of the drawing there is shown a modified dispensing cap 50 of the present invention which is similar to the dispensing cap. 10. This modified dispensing cap 59 includes a cap member 12 having a top 54 and a dependent, internally threaded skirt 56. From F to be the obvious manner.

in the'top 86. leads from the bottom 3180 of the groove 92 into the inthe top 54 of the cap member 52 there extend parallel shoulders or arms 58 of a resilient character similar to the arms 39 previously describedr These arms 58 overlie portions 60 of a spout '62 so as'to securely hold the bottom 64 of this spout against the bottom 65 of what may be considered a groove 68 defined by the two arms 58 and the top 54 of the cap 56.

A hole 70 leads from the center portion of the bottom 66 of the groove 68 to the inside of the cap member 52 surrounded by the skirt 56, and around this hole 70 there is formed an annular ridge 72 similar to the ridge 24 previously described. This ridge 72 deforms slightly during the use of this dispensing cap 50 so as to securely form a seal at all times, even when the spout 62 is moved within the groove 68. During such motion, of course, the arms 58 securely and resiliently hold the spout against the bottom 65 of this groove 53. In use the spout 66 is moved so as to place a passage 74 formed within the spout in direct communication with the hole 70 so that the contents of a container may be dispensed through the dispensing cap 59. It is noted that small ridges 76 are provided upon each end of the groove 68 upon the top 54 of the dispensing cap 5%, in order to aid in aligning the passage 74 and the hole 7% and so as to insure against movement of the spout 62 oif the top 54 of the cap member 52.

From the aforegoing those skilled in the art will realize that the dispensing cap 5%? is very similar to the dispensing cap 16 indicated in the preceding discussion. This dispensing cap 58 does not, however, include an extra hole.

for use in allowing passage of air into a container upon which the cap 5%) is employed. If desired, such another hole may be added to the cap 5% in what is considered An important feature of the cap 5% lies in the fact that the spout 62 may be easily assembled upon the top 54 of the cap member 52 by merely snapping or deforming temporarily the arms 58 so as to permit insertion of the spout 62 within the groove 68. if desired, the ends of the spout 62 within this groove may be knurled or otherwise formed so as to facilitate the movement of the spout 62 within this groove, although this is not considered necessary with this embodiment of the invention because projecting character of the ends of the spout shown. The spout 62 and the cap member 52 are preferably formed of the same or equivalent materials used in forming the cap member 12 and the spout 26 previously indicated. 7

Such materials are also preferably employed in forming a spout 8d and a cap member 82 in a further modified dispensing cap 84 of the present invention shown in Figs. 8 and 9 of the drawings. This dispensing cap 84 is formed so that the cap member 82 includes a top'86 and an internally threaded sln'rt 88 and arms or shoulders of' a resilient character extending from the top 86 so as to define a groove 92 in which the spout 8t? is'carried. The arms 9!) overlay portions 9 of the spout in this embodiment of the invention so as to securely hold at all times the spout in position against a deformable ridge 96 similar to the ridge 2d surrounding a hole or opening 98 It will be realized that the opening 98 terior ofthe cap member 82.

With the dispensing cap 84 another ridge 102 similar to the ridge 24 is provided within the bottom 1G0 around an air hole 164 which is also located upon the top 86 so as to lead from the bottom Hit) of the groove 92 into the interior of cap member 82. Also in the dispensing cap 84- a small, elongated groove 106 which is normally covered by means of a spout is provided within the bottom tilt? of the groove 92 and a small projection 108 is provided upon the bottom 110 of the spout 80 so as to fit within this groove 106. In essence the groove 1% acts as a stop or limiting means so as to limit the movementof the spout 80 from a closed position as shown to an open position which is achieved when the spout 80 is moved to the right of the position shown in Fig. 9 of the drawing or when this spout 80 is moved from an open position to a closed position as shown. When the spout 80 is moved to such an open position, a passage 112 within the spout is aligned with the hole or opening 98. Also when the spout is moved to such an open position, the hole 104 is, of course, uncovered.

One feature of the dispensing cap 84 lies in the fact that means are employed for limiting movement of the spout 80 which are not visible to the eye and which are covered at all times so as to avoid clogging from dirt or the like. The arms 90 with this embodiment of the invention are preferably of such resiliency as to permit easy insertion of the spout. If desired, knurled surfaces 114 may be provided on the spout 80 so as to aid in the movement of the spout.

Those skilled in the art to which this invention pertains will realize that a large number of different types of dispensing cap structures may be readily designed to utilize the essential type of action achieved as shown and described in this application. They will further realize that with any of the cap structures herein shown and described a separate air hole to facilitate pouring may be either incorporated or left out depending upon certain commercial factors. It is considered important that cap structures formed in this manner indicated have a generally flat appearance and present a pleasing appearance to the eye when used on various types of containers. It is also considered important that no projecting means or parts are normally formed as an integral part of the dispensing caps herein shown and described which preclude the use of these caps in modern automatic equipment utilized in order to place conventional caps on various types of containers. Obviously any of the types of cap structures herein shown and described can be used with various means for attaching these cap struc tures to a container besides the means specifically indicated in this specification, and if desired, these cap structures may be formed as an integral part of the tops of various types of containers, such as for example, tubes formed out of polyethylene.

An important aspect of this invention lies in the discovery that means such as are described in this specification can be employed in order to create what may be termed a sliding type of seal, and that with a structure as herein described that a satisfactory balanced' type of force distribution necessary to form a seal can be obtained. Because of these and other factors this invention is to be considered as being limited only by the appended claims forming a part of this specification, and these claims in turn are to be considered as being limited only by the conventional patent doctrine of equivalents.

We claim:

1. A cap structure which includes a cap member formed of a material having resilient properties, said cap member being formed so as to have an external groove partially covered by resilient overhanging shoulders formed thereon, said groove having a bottom, said cap member having a hole formed therein leading from said bottom of said groove into the interior of said cap member, said cap member including a deformable sealing ridge having a V-shaped cross-sectional configuration located in said bottom around said hole; and a spout having a flat bottom resiliently held in said groove against said sealing ridge by engagement with said shoulders, said spout being a passage formed therein terminating adjacent to the bottom of said groove, said spout having a flat bottom adjacent to said. bottom of said groove, said spout being capable of being moved so as to place said passage in communication with said hole, said spout deforming said ridge so as to form a seal around said hole at all times; and means for limiting movement of said spout with respect to said cap for use in aligning said hole and said passage.

2. A dispensing cap as defined in claim 1 including: means defining another hole formed to lead from the bottom of said groove through said top, said other hole being located with respect to said hole so as to be normally sealed by said spout and so as to be uncovered when said spout is moved to place said passage in communication with said hole.

3. A dispensing cap which includes: a top formed of a resilient material; means formed integrally with said top for attaching said top to a container; means defining a groove in said top on the side thereof remote from said means for attaching said top to a container, said groove having a bottom; means defining a hole leading from the bottom of said groove through said top; ridge means formed integrally with said top extending around said hole in said bottom of said groove, said ridge means being capable of deformation in the formation of a seal; resilient arm means formed integrally with said top and overlying at least part of said groove adjacent to said hole, said resilient means extending above said hole and said groove; a spout fitting within said groove, said spout having a flat bottom being capable of being slid within said groove, said spout being engaged by said resilient arm means, said resilient arm means holding said spout against the bottom of said groove and said ridge means so as to form a seal between said spout and the bottom of said groove around said hole; and means defining a passage within said spout, said passage terminating in a portion of said spout adjacent to the bottom of said groove, said spout being capable of being moved so as to place said passage in communication with said hole.

4. A dispensing cap as defined in claim 3 wherein said spout is formed of a resilient material.

5. A dispensing cap as defined in claim 3 including: projection means formed on said spout and said top, said projection means serving to limit movement of said spout within said groove so as to prevent the accidental movement of said spout out of said groove and so as to aid in aligning said passage with said hole, said projection means being capable of temporary deformation so as to permit assembly of said spout within said groove.

6. A dispensing cap as defined in claim 3 including: means defining another hole in said top, said other hole leading from the bottom of said groove through said top, said other hole being spaced so as to be normally covered by said spout and so as to be uncovered by said spout when said spout is moved so as to place said passage in communication with said hole.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,018,552 Cooke Feb. 27, 1912 2,033,256 Schacher Mar. 10, 1936 2,141,572 Tucker Dec. 27, 1938 2,171,175 Grate Aug. 29, 1939 2,202,653 Glidden May 28, 1940 2,532,690 Zimmerman Dec. 5, 1950 2,701,668 Zayan Feb. 8, 1955 2,717,726 Mart Sept. 13, 1955 2,727,658 Mart Dec. 20, 1955 2,793,795 Wilson et al. May 28, 1957 2,828,895 Mart Apr. 1, 1958 2,866,580 Nissen Dec. 30, 1958

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1018552 *Oct 4, 1911Feb 27, 1912Richard T CookeCan-spout.
US2033256 *Feb 28, 1935Mar 10, 1936Herman SchacherTop for containers
US2141572 *Jan 18, 1937Dec 27, 1938Stevens Tucker WilmonClosure device for collapsible tubes
US2171175 *Oct 31, 1938Aug 29, 1939Martin Grafe PaulCollapsible tube closure
US2202653 *May 19, 1939May 28, 1940Glidden Arthur RClosure device
US2532690 *Jun 17, 1946Dec 5, 1950Zimmerman Jay VApertured cap for collapsible tube, having friction-biased reciprocable closure for the aperture
US2701668 *Jun 21, 1950Feb 8, 1955Charles Zayan HenriAutomatic tap applicable in all classes of containers and recipients or conducts forrunning liquids
US2717726 *Sep 22, 1951Sep 13, 1955Mart Harry ACombined spout and cock
US2727658 *Jun 30, 1951Dec 20, 1955Mart Harry ACombined spout and valve structure
US2793795 *Dec 11, 1956May 28, 1957Carabel Morton ADispensing closures
US2828895 *Sep 28, 1953Apr 1, 1958Libit Sidney MCombined spout and cock for a dispensing type receptacle
US2866580 *Aug 21, 1956Dec 30, 1958Ronson CorpDispensing spout structure
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3118577 *Oct 14, 1960Jan 21, 1964Estabrook Alton EClosure for material dispensing device
US3146913 *Jun 29, 1961Sep 1, 1964Kiyoshi NagaiCap having a non-drip spout
US3174661 *Feb 5, 1963Mar 23, 1965Lakeland Packaging IncDispenser cap having a sliding closure
US3659758 *Dec 10, 1969May 2, 1972Atlantic Design & Dev CorpSliding top internal pourer bottle cap
US4091965 *Jun 22, 1976May 30, 1978Gerico, Inc.Combined feeding spout and cap attachment
US4257537 *Aug 20, 1979Mar 24, 1981Owens-Illinois, Inc.Child resistant sifter type closure
US4310105 *Apr 24, 1980Jan 12, 1982Sunbeam Plastics CorporationChild-resistant dispensing closure
US4346821 *Jan 31, 1979Aug 31, 1982Afa Consolidated CorporationChild-resistant closures for container mounted spray dispensers
US4938393 *Nov 6, 1989Jul 3, 1990The Procter & Gamble CompanyBimodal storage and dispensing package for fluent material
US5115949 *Mar 23, 1990May 26, 1992Bielsteiner Verschlusstechnik GmbhFlexible liquid container with a sliding closure cap
US5390828 *May 20, 1993Feb 21, 1995Aptargroup, Inc.Closure with two-part slidable dispensing cap
US5425483 *Dec 17, 1993Jun 20, 1995Mertes; James S.Dispensing cap for vessel
US6216919 *Sep 16, 1999Apr 17, 2001Ae' LaryMeasured liquid dispensing cap assembly
US6896161Sep 15, 2003May 24, 2005Bmf GmbhCloseable dispensing device for dispensing a liquid, viscous, or pasty medium contained in a container
US20040094580 *Sep 15, 2003May 20, 2004Werner PatzCloseable dispensing device for dispensing a liquid, viscous, or pasty medium contained in a container
US20050017030 *Jul 12, 2004Jan 27, 2005Bmf GmbhSealable dispenser for dispensing a fluid, viscous or pasty medium contained in a container
EP0196250A1 *Mar 6, 1986Oct 1, 1986COMPAGNIE DE RAFFINAGE ET DE DISTRIBUTION TOTAL FRANCE: Société Anonyme diteCapless can provided with a sliding lid
WO1988006568A1 *Feb 29, 1988Sep 7, 1988Package Research CorporationToothpaste dispenser
WO2002074651A3 *Jan 10, 2002Jan 23, 2003Bmf GmbhClosable dispensing device for dispensing a liquid, viscous or pasty medium contained in a container
WO2006013179A1 *Jul 26, 2005Feb 9, 2006Bmf GmbhCloseable dispensing device
Classifications
U.S. Classification222/512, 222/537, 222/561, 222/484
International ClassificationB65D47/04, B65D47/28
Cooperative ClassificationB65D47/286
European ClassificationB65D47/28D