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Publication numberUS2972765 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 28, 1961
Filing dateNov 29, 1956
Priority dateNov 29, 1956
Publication numberUS 2972765 A, US 2972765A, US-A-2972765, US2972765 A, US2972765A
InventorsJames C Macy, Frank J Camillo, Alfred L Smith
Original AssigneeCamilco Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Paint tray assembly
US 2972765 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

PAINT TRAY ASSEMBLY Filed NOV. 29,-1956 3 Sheets-Sheet 1 JAM c. MACY, FRANK J. CAMILLO a ALFRED L. SMITH ATTORNEY INVENTORSI Feb. 28, 1961 J. c. MACY E'IIAL 2,972,765

PAINT TRAY ASSEMBLY INVENTORS JAMES c. MACY,

FRANK J. CAMILLO a ALFRED 1.. SMITH BY {W ATTORNEY Feb. 28, 1961 J, c. MACY ET AL 2,972,765

PAINT TRAY ASSEMBLY Filed Nov. 29. 1956 3 Sheets-Sheet 5 INVENTORS JAMES c. MACY, FRANK J. CAMILLO a ALFRED L; SMITH BY [MA/W ATTORNB Y United States PatentO PAINT TRAY ASSEMBLY Filed Nov. 29, 1956, Ser. No. 625,077

18 Claims. 01. 15257.06)

The present invention relates to new and useful improvements in painting equipment, and more particularly to such improvements in paint trays of the type conventionally used in connection with the application of paint to a paint roller.

Paint trays of this type have generally been in a form having a shallow end and a deeper end in which the supply of paint is disposed. In using paint rollers, these rollers are positioned within the tray so that the roller may be covered with the paint at the deep end of the tray and then rolled toward the shallow end of the tray to distribute the paint more or less evenly on the roller. The use of such paint trays requires the unpleasant task of cleaning the same after each use so that the tray is clean for use at another time or for paint of a different color.

The present invention generally contemplates the provision of a removable tray type liner which may be used with such paint .trays in order to protect them from actual contact with the paint, thus to obviate the task of cleaning the trays. More specifically, however, this invention contemplates the provision of av removable and disposable tray type liner which is formed of relatively inexpensive material and which may be shipped in the flat and then folded to proper tray formation for use.

With the above in mind, one of the principal objects of the invention is to provide a paint tray assembly for use in coating paint rollers and one in which the liner which directly receives the paint may be thrown away after each use, thus reducing to a minimum the chores ordinarily attached to the cleaning of paint-holding receptacles and the like.

Another object of the invention is to provide a skeleton type supporting frame for the disposable traytype liner, thus eliminating, if desired, the use of the relatively more expensive paint trays with imperforate sides and bottoms.

A further object of the invention is to provide a supporting framework which is provided with adequate support for the removable tray'type liner and one which isconstructed to receive the tray-type liner in generally interlocked relationship therewith.

A still further object ofthe invention is to provide a supporting frame for a removable and disposable traytype liner which is provided with inwardly extending supporting projections adapted to-support the liner.

A still further object of the invention is to provide a disposable tray-typeliner forsuch a supporting frame, wherein the tray-type liner is folded in such a manner as to provide external projections or folds adapted to interlock with supporting projections on the supporting frame.

The invention also aims to provide an assembly su-bstantially of the above type which is relatively simple in construction, which is inexpensive to manufacture and which requires a minimum amount of cleaning after each use by reason of the provision of the disposable paint holding tray-type liner. a a

The above and other objects of the invention will in part be obvious and will be hereinafter more fully pointed out. I

In the accompanying drawings:

Fig. 1 is a top plan view of the disposable liner in its fiat condition for shipment but showing the fold lines preformed thereon;

Fig. 2 is a perspective view of the liner of Fig. 1 but showing the same partially folded to its tray formation for insertion in the supporting frame;

Fig. 3 is a top plan view of the supporting frame;

Fig. 4 is an end elevation of the supporting frame;

Fig. 5 is a sectional view taken substantially along the line 5-5 of Fig. 3;

- matically illustrated as being mounted on the rung of a ladder;

Fig. 7 is a sectional view taken substantially along the line 7-7 of Fig. 6 with the liner removed;

Fig. 8 is a fragmentary sectional view taken substantially along the line 88 of Fig. 7, and

Fig. 9 is a fragmentary enlarged perspective detail view showing the manner of interconnecting one corner fold of the liner with the corresponding supporting projection on the supporting frame.

Referring more in detail to the accompanying drawings, and particularly to Figs. 1 and 2 at this time, the liner is formed from a single blank of cardboard or the like which is coated with plastic or wax, at least interiorly, to prevent leakage of paint therethrough. The blank consists of a central bottom portion 10 defined by end fold lines 11, 12, and side fold lines 14, 14a. The material of the blank is'extended beyond the fold line 11 to provide an end section16 which, when folded, forms the end wall of the tray at the deep end thereof. This end section 16 terminates in a fold line 17 and a projecting tab portion 18 having an intermediate fold line 19. The opposite end of the material of the blank is extended beyond the fold line 12 to provide an end wall 20 which, when folded, becomes the end wall of the tray-like liner at the shallow end. Beyond a fold line 21 there is a tab portion 22 having an intermediate fold line 23.

At the sides of the bottom portion 10 of the blank, along the side fold lines 14, 14a, are side portions 24, 24a which have the outermost edges thereof tapered from the deep end inwardly toward the shallow end, these side portions 24, 24a being adapted for folding upwardly along the fold lines 14, 14a, respectively, to form the side walls of the tray-type liner.

There are corner flaps 26, 26a at the deep end and smaller corner flaps 27, 27a at the shallow end. The corner flaps 26, 26a are defined by, fold lines 28, 28a, respectively, along the side margin of the end panel 16 and by fold lines 29, 29a, respectively, along the margin of the side panels 24, 24a. Each corner flap 26, 26:: includes a diagonal fold line 30, 30a, respectively, extending outwardly from an adjacent corner of the bottom portion 10 to the corner of the corner flaps. Similar fold lines are provided for the smaller corner flaps 27, 27a, as the fold lines 31, 31a along the end section 20; the fold lines 32, 32a along the adjacent ends of the sections 24, 24a, respectively; and the diagonal fold lines 33, 33a. Laterally extending fiaps 34, 34a are provided substantially intermediate the free outer edges of the side portions 24, 24a, and joined thereto by fold lines 35, 35a for purposes to be hereinafter pointed out. I

'When folding the blank to form the tray-type liner, the side walls 24, 24a are folded upwardly to the position shown in Fig. 2 with the fold lines 29, 29a, 32, 32a

in a substantially vertical position and withthe diagonal fold lines ,30, 30a disposed outwardly of the foldedside Patented Feb. 28,1961

sections 24, 24a, as shown in Fig. 2. Then, the end panels In, 20 are brought into abutting position with the adjacent vertical edges of the side panels so that the sections of each corner flap on opposite sides of the corresponding diagonal fold line are brought together with the corners along the diagonal fold lines disposed outwardly for grasping to bend each inwardly to lie next to the exterior surface of the adjacent end of each side section. When folded in this manner, the diagonal fold lines forming the corner of each folded flap will incline upwardly from the bottom of the folded liner and toward the center of each side section. With this construction, there is no tendency for the paint to leak out of the deep end of the folded tray or liner because the level of paint in the liner will not be above the edge of the fold lines which are substantially along the top and on the outside of the adjacent side walls of the folded tray.

The end flaps 18, 22 and the marginal portions along fold lines 19, 23 are then folded inwardly and downwardly so as to wedge the adjacent surfaces of the corresponding side walls outwardly into snug fitting relationship with the corner flaps, which, however, are unsecured so as to cooperate with the supporting frame, as will be referred to hereinafter. Also, the side flaps 34, 34a are folded downwardly for cooperation with the frame as will be pointed out.

Along the shallow end of the bottom 10 of the tray, there is provided an added auxiliary bottom section in the form of a tree having a central rib portion 35 and arms 36 diverging therefrom. These diverging arms form ridges and are inclined toward the deep end of the liner, thus tending not only to evenly distribute the paint on the roller as it is rolled toward the shallow end, but also to direct any excess paint from the roller rearwardly toward the deep end of the tray.

For a detailed description of the supporting frame, reference will be made to Figs. 3 through 9 in which it will be seen that the frame is of a skeleton type and is substantially formed from a single piece of metal which may be conveniently stamped and shaped. For lightness, preferably a thin gauge metal, such as aluminum, may be employed and the metal may be turned upon itself and otherwise strengthened in various ways which will be referred to hereinafter. The frame includes side walls 37, 37a and end walls 38, 39. Thus, the blank from which the frame is made is bent to provide these side and end walls, the side wall 37 having an inturned flange 40 over which the adjacent end portion of the end wall 39 is disposed for attachment thereto as by welding, riveting or the like. As seen in Figs. 6 and 7, the side walls are inclined upwardly from the .deep end for the major portion of their lengths. The inner bottom edges of the side walls merge, for the remainder of their lengths, with further depending portions 41, 41a. Each of these depending portions is substantially identical and reference is made to Fig. 7 for the description of the portion 41 which is provided with a cutout portion or slot extending longitudinally and opening rearwardly of the frame. The top and end edges of the material of the side portion 41 along the slot or cutout is bent inwardly upon itself to provide reinforcing and strengthening layers 42, 43. The material of the bottom edge of the slot is bent inwardly to provide a holding flange 44, there being an identical flange 44a on the other side portion 41a. As shown in Fig. 6, these cutouts are for the purpose of receiving the rung of a ladder and the inwardly directed flanges 44, 44a not only strengthen the frame but also engage the bottom surface of the ladder rung over a substantial area to lend additional stability to the frame when so mounted.

Along the inclined bottom edges of the side walls 37, 37:; there are provided inwardly directed supporting flanges 45, 45a each inclined similarly with respect, to its associated side wall. These supporting flanges extend 4 from the end wall 39 toward the opposite end of the frame and become progressively wider as they approach the end wall 38. For reinforcement and strengthening, the longitudinal marginal edges of these supporting flanges 45, 45a are turned upon themselves, as at 46, 46a. To cooperate with the supporting flanges or ledges 45, 45a, in supporting the liner, the front wall 38 is provided with an inwardly directed supporting flange or ledge 48 which is struck from the material of the wall 38, as the flanges 44, 44a are struck from the material of the wall portions 41, 41a, respectively. This supporting flange 48 is inclined somewhat downwardly and is generally similar to the inclination of the supporting flanges 45, 45a to lie substantially in the same inclined plane.

For further strengthening, there is provided a U-shaped strip 49 of heavier metal which is fitted along the bottom of the wall 38 with the leg portions following along the bottom portions of the walls 41, 41a and riveted, welded or otherwise suitably secured thereto. At the bottom of the opening resulting from the inward bending of the flange 48, there is an additional flange 50 which overlies the web portion of the reinforcing member 49 and is in engagement therewith to further add rigidity to the structure and resistance to twisting when in use. The opposite or rear wall 39 has at the bottom thereof an inwardly directed and upwardly inclined supporting flange 51 underlying the adjacent ends of the supporting flanges 45, 45a and also having the free edge thereof turned upwardly and inwardly upon itself, as at 52, for additional strength. Also, the side and end walls may be ribbed, as at 53, for added strength and resistance to twisting. Likewise, the top edges of each of the end and side walls are turned inwardly and downwardly, upon themselves, as at 54, for reinforcement purposes.

Each side wall 37, 37a has inwardly offset portions struck from the material thereof to provide locking lugs. Thus, at the deep end of the frame there are provided locking lugs 55, 55a and at the shallow end there are provided locking lugs 56, 56a. It is the lower inclined edges of these locking or supporting lugs that remain integral with the side walls and it is to be noted that these lugs are inclined similarly with respect to the corresponding corner flaps of. the liner when folded for insertion into the frame.

Reference is made to Fig. 9 showing the manner in which the liner is inserted into the supporting frame. Thus, for illustration, the folded corner flap 26a of the liner is inserted with the deep end thereof into the frame adjacent the end wall 39 with the diagonal edge 30a of the corner flap fitting within the lip provided by the offset locking or supporting lug 55a. Further and complete insertion of the liner into the tray will cause the diagonal edge 30a to lie along the bottom edge of the lug 55a and the liner is shown completely positioned within the frame in Fig. 6 wherein there, is also shown in dotted lines, a conventional paint roller R. The projecting tabs 18, 22 at opposite ends of the liner are folded inwardly thereof with the marginal edges also bent inwardly and downwardly along the fold lines 19, 23, respectively. By folding in these end tab portions, their opposite edges tightly engage the adjacent surfaces of the side walls to compress the folded corners outwardly against the surfaces of the side walls of the frame. This construction serves to seal the liner against leakage of paint but without the necessity of using an adhesive or the like. The intermediate projecting tabs 34, 34a along the edges of the sides of the liner are then bent outwardly and downwardly for insertion within longitudinal slots 56, 56a in the frame side walls 37, 3711, respectively, to thus further secure the liner within the frame.

From the foregoing description, it will be seen that the end and side walls of the supporting frame are shaped generally complemental to the side and end walls of the inserted liner. Further, the supporting ledges 45,4511, 48 on the frame lie in a plane whichis inclined simi larly with respect to the inclination of the bottom wall of the liner which is supported thereon. While the liner may be used with an imperforate paint tray to prevent direct contact of paint with the tray, such liner is particularly adapted for use with the herein disclosed skeleton type of supporting frame. This type of frame results in a very substantial saving in material by reason of the generally open bottom. However, the supporting flanges 45, 45a give suflicient support to the inserted liner and this is particularly true by reason of the wider inner ends thereof which are located fairly close to the cooperating supporting flange 48. With this construction, sufficient surface support is given to the bottom of the liner in the region of the tree so that the roller can be pressed therealong but still thebottom of the liner is sufliciently supported by-theflanges of the skeleton frame. Additionally, the similar inclination of the supporting lugs on the sides of the frame and the folded corner flaps of the liner cooperate to provide wedging action supporting lines of contact therebetween, as well as interlocking between the frame and liner. The inwardly and downwardly bent end flaps of the liner serve to maintain this interconnection intact.

The frame is extremely light in weight and may be conveniently fabricated for inexpensive distribution. While light in weight, the frame is also reinforced at selected areas to strengthen the same and resist tendency for it to twist, particularly when supported only at one end, as on a ladder rung, the slot and flange formation providing such supporting means for the assembly. The bottom edge of the so-called deep end of the frame is not at a materially different level from the bottom of the opposite end and the support structure so that the frame may be placed on a level surface without too great tilting thereof. Obviously, if desired, these two points of support could be formed to lie in the same horizontal plane, if desired.

While certain forms of the invention have been shown for purposes of illustration, it is to be clearly understood that various changes in the details of construction and arrangement of parts may be made without departing from the spirit and scope of the appended claims.

We claim:

1. A paint tray assembly comprising a substantially rectangular and relatively shallow support including side and end Walls and bottom wall means inclined downwardly from one end wall to the other, a disposable tray-like liner of complemental configuration to that of the support and having a bottom and side and end walls fitting respectively within the side and end walls of said support with the bottomwall resting on said bot: tom wall means to incline the liner from one end to the other, and mutually interfltting means adjacent the corners of said support and liner confining the corners of the liner to the corners of the support and maintaining the side and end walls of the liner in juxtaposition to the corresponding walls of the support. I

2. A paint tray assembly as claimed in claim 1, wherein the support is in the form of a skeleton frame including inwardly directed flange means forming the bottom wall means along the bottom thereof for adding support to the bottom of the liner.

3. A paint tray assembly as claimed in claim 1, wherein the mutually interfitting means comprises inwardly extending lugs on the side walls of the support having the free ends thereof facing upwardly and outwardly disposed corner portions on the side walls of the liner having free edges facing downwardly for interconnection with the lugs on the support.

4. A paint tray assembly as claimed in claim 3, wherein the said free ends of the lugs and outwardly disposed corner portions are similarly inclined downwardly toward adjacent corners of the support and liner for effecting a wedging interconnection therebetween.

5. A paint tray assembly as claimed in claim 1, wherein the bottom of the liner is provided with ridge portionsadjacent one end thereof, and wherein the bottom wall means includes flanges extending inwardly from the bottoms of the side walls of the support and inclined similarly with respect to the bottom of the liner, and said flanges being wider at the ends thereof adjacent the shallow end of the support for giving additional support to the liner beneath the ridge portions.

6. A substantially rectangular paint tray assembly facilitating application of paint to a paint roller and comprising a skeleton supporting frame including a shallow front end wall and a relatively deeper rear end wall joined to one another by side walls, flange means extending inwardly from the side walls of the frame and.

inclined downwardly toward the deeper rear end wall, a tray-like paint receiving liner folded from a relatively flexible sheet material blank to form a paint receptacle having a shallow front end wall and a relatively deeper. rear end wall joined by side walls having inclined bottom edges joined to a similarly inclined bottom wall and similarly positioned within the supporting frame to rest on the said inclined flange means, and mutually interfitting means adjacent the corners of said frame and liner confining the corners of the liner to the corners of the frame and maintaining the side and end walls of the liner in juxtaposition to the corresponding walls of the frame.

7. A paint tray assembly as claimed in claim 6, wherein theframe is provided with additional flanges extending inwardly from the bottom edges of the front and rear end walls and similarly inclined with respect to the flange means for additionally supporting the bottom of the liner.

8. A paint tray assembly as claimed in claim 6, wherein the flange means extending inwardly from the side walls of the frame are relatively wider at'the ends thereof adjacent the shallow end of the frame to provide additional support for the bottom of the liner along the area traversed by a paint roller.

9. A paint tray assembly as claimed in claim 6, wherein the interfitting means on the frame comprises inwardly disposed lugs adjacent the ends of the side walls with the free edges of the lugs inclined downwardly toward adjacent corners of the frame, and wherein the interfitting means on the liner includes corner folds disposed exteriorly of the side walls thereof and inclined downwardly toward the adjacent corners of the folded liner complementally to the inclined free edges of the lugs for wedging interconnection behind the adjacent lugs on the frame.

10. A paint tray assembly as claimed in claim 6, wherein the upper edges of the side walls of the liner include projecting flaps extending over the upper edges of the side walls of the frame and inwardly through corresponding slots in the side walls of the frame.

11. A skeleton frame adapted for supporting a removable paint receiving liner receptacle, and comprising a shallow front end wall and a relatively deeper rearend wall joined to one another by side walls having at least a portion of the bottom edges thereof inclined downwardly from the shallow end wall to the deeper end wall, flanges extending inwardly from the bottom edges of said side walls along a substantial portion of the lengths thereof and being wider adjacent the front end wall,

13. A skeleton frame as claimed in claim 11, wherein the'flange on the rear end wall underlies the adjacent ends of the flanges on the side walls, and wherein the wider ends of the flanges on the side walls terminate short of the flange on the front end wall.

14. A paint tray assembly comprising a supporting frame including peripheral side and end walls, a disposable tray-like liner positioned within said frame and having peripheral side and end walls and a bottom wall and loose corner folds between adjacent side and end Walls presenting outer corner flaps, and means supporting the liner within 'said frame and including locking lugs on peripheral walls of the frame interlocking with said corner flaps for maintaining the shape of the peripheral walls of the liner and for supporting said liner with the bottom wall thereof inclined between the end walls of said frame.

15. A paint tray assembly as claimed in claim 14, wherein the frame includes a bottom wall means at least partially underlying and engaging the bottom wall of the liner and inclined similarly with respect thereto.

16. A paint tray assembly comprising a supporting frame including relatively shallow and deep end walls joined by side walls, a disposable and relatively flexible tray-like liner positioned within said frame and having peripheral side and end walls and a bottom wall and loose corner folds between adjacent side and end Walls presenting outer corner flaps, and means on said frame cooperating with corner flaps of the liner for maintaining the shape of the peripheral walls of the liner and for supporting the liner with the bottom wall thereof inclined between the relatively shallow and deep end walls of the frame.

17. A paint tray assembly as claimed in claim 16, wherein the end walls of the liner are relatively shallow and deep and are positioned adjacent and within the relatively shallow and deep end walls of the frame.

18. A paint tray assembly as claimed in claim 16, wherein an end wall of the liner is provided with an upstanding flap bent inwardly and downwardly to press the inner portions of the adjacent corner folds outwardly against the corner flaps.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 640,557 Haas Jan. 2, 1900 642,182 Webb Ian. 30, 1900 1,098,053 Porter May 26, 1914 1,932,429 Wellman Oct. 31, 1933 2,366,602 De Haven Jan. 2, 1945 2,414,920 Amberg Jan. 28, 1947 2,500,466 Myers Mar 14, 1950 2,688,420 Bishop et al. Sept. 7, 1954 2,808,960 Wilson 2. Oct. 8, 1957 2,849,949 'Frachtman Sept. 2, 1958 FOREIGN PATENTS 827 Great Britain of 1891 78,531 5 Norway May 7, 1951 1,093,203 France Nov. 17, 1954

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3110921 *Jun 15, 1962Nov 19, 1963Herbert Conner AdrianPaint roller tray assembly
US3157902 *Jan 4, 1963Nov 24, 1964Hardwick Thomas LDisposable paint tray liner
US3752494 *Jul 12, 1971Aug 14, 1973K DunnPaint cart assembly and method of fabrication
US3858787 *Feb 25, 1974Jan 7, 1975Olinkraft IncDisposable paint tray
US5471703 *May 16, 1994Dec 5, 1995Home E Z Products, Inc.Apparatus for applying paint
US5727708 *Nov 13, 1996Mar 17, 1998Erickson Tool Design, Inc.Liner for lining a bucket
US8172106 *Aug 20, 2008May 8, 2012Eric ClampLaminated pulp disposable paint tray
US8418308 *Mar 2, 2010Apr 16, 2013Willis Gerald MajorGrid paint dipper
US20100119417 *Nov 9, 2009May 13, 2010Biotix, Inc.Degradable fluid handling devices
US20110214243 *Mar 2, 2010Sep 8, 2011Willis Gerald MajorGrid Paint Dipper
Classifications
U.S. Classification15/257.6, 220/495.2, 229/908, D32/53.1
International ClassificationB44D3/12
Cooperative ClassificationY10S229/908, B44D3/126
European ClassificationB44D3/12J