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Publication numberUS2973027 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 28, 1961
Filing dateJul 5, 1956
Priority dateJul 5, 1956
Publication numberUS 2973027 A, US 2973027A, US-A-2973027, US2973027 A, US2973027A
InventorsWard J Navelle, Vries Nicholas De, Ernest F Becher
Original AssigneeWard J Navelle, Vries Nicholas De, Ernest F Becher
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Reclining chair
US 2973027 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

1961 w. J. NAVELLE ET AL 2,973,027

RECLINING CHAIR Filed July 5, 1956 IN VEN TOR.

RECLINING CHAIR Ward J. Navelle, Park Road, Medina, N.Y.; Nicholas de Vrres, Tradition Corner, Brookfield, Conn.; and Ernest F. Becher, 250 Elmwood Ave., East Aurora,

Filed July 5, 1956, Ser. No. 596,034

3 Claims. (Cl. 155-106) This invention relates to a reclining chair and more particularly to such a chair adapted for use conventionally as a normal upholstered upright lounge chair but which has movable back, seat and leg rest parts movably connected to one another and to the base of the chair and controlled by substantially identical linkages at opposite sides of the chair and which linkages serve to maintain these movable parts in proper relationship to one another to provide the maximum comfort at any selected degree of reclining of these parts.

One of the principal objects of the present invention is to provide such a reclining chair which is of attractive appearance and which can be made to follow closely the desirable form and appearance of well designed nonreclining chairs, particularly in being supported by relatively high legs so as to provide a relatively high open space underneath the chair and thereby avoid a base of massive appearance. This object is attained by the design and location of the linkages, these linkages being located alongside of the seat and back parts of the chair instead of under the seat part, in which latter case the sides of the chair base are generally required to be brought down close to the floor in order to conceal the linkages under the seat part.

Another object is to provide such a reclining chair which does not have any loose lengths of cloth between the back part and the base which some reclining chairs have for concealment purposes. Such pieces of cloth have a highly undesirable droopy appearance.

Another object is to provide such a reclining chair in which the linkages cause each movable chair part to track the other chair parts in such manner that in any degree of recline of these parts they are jointly in position to support the user with a maximum of comfort.

Another object is to provide such a reclining chair which is smooth and trouble free in its actionand in particular operates without peaks of resistance, noise or any uncertainties in action.

Another object is to provide such a reclining chair which, particularly when extended, is sturdy and free from wobbliness.

Another object is to provide such a reclining chair in which opposing leverages rather than friction are employed to control the movement of the chair parts. Where friction is relied upon, the chair in time wears into an undesirable looseness.

Another object is to provide such a reclining chair in which the movable parts fold and unfold without any tendency to pull or crumple the clothing of the user, such as the tendency of some reclining chairs to pull out the shirt of the user.

Another object of the invention is to provide such a reclining chair in which the leg rest part can be made to move away from the seat part simultaneously with the upward movement of this leg rest part along with the front of the seat part so that with a comparatively small leg rest part it is brought to a position to comfortaoly support the legs of a tall user near his ankles.

Other objects and advantages of the invention will apatent pear from the following description and drawings in which:

Figure l is a front elevational view of a reclining chair embodying the present invention, the chair being shown in its erect or non-reclining position.

Fig. 2 is a vertical sectional view taken generally on line 2-2, of Fig. 1.

Fig. 3 is a View similar to Fig. 2 but showing the position of the parts when the seat, back and leg rest parts of the chair are swung to their full reclining positions.

Fig. 4 is a fragmentary vertical section through the base of the chair, this section being taken generally on line 4-4, Fig. l.

Fig. 5 is an enlarged fragmentary vertical sectional view taken generally on line 55, Fig. 3. V 7

Fig. 6 is a fragmentary bottom plan view of the leg rest part of the chair and a part of its supporting linkage, this view being taken on line 6-6, Fig. 3, looking upwardly. I

In the form of the invention illustrated in the drawings, the numeral 5 represents the base of the chair and which has arms 6 provided by the usual pair of side frames which can be of any suitable construction and can be enclosed in a fabric or leather cover '7 as shown. The base is shown as including fore-and-aft side bars 8 connected by cross bars 9 and 19 and is supported by front legs 11 and rear legs 12 so as to provide a space 13 of substantial height under the chair.

The numeral 16 represents the upholstered back part or back rest of the reclining chair which can be of any form to have its lower part tit between the arms 6 of the base 5. A pivot 17 illustrated as being in the form of a horizontal pivot rod extending through the back part 16 pivotally connects the lower part of the back rest 16 with the fore-and-aft bars 8 of the base 5. For this purpose each longitudinal side bar 8 of the base 5 is shown as carrying a bushing 13, as illustrated in Fig. 4, in which the corresponding end of the pivot rod 17 is journalled. The back rest 16 extends downwardly so as to provide a lower extension 19 below the pivot rod 17. A fiat bar or metal strap 20 is fastened to each side of the downward extension 19 of the chair back rest 16, as by screws 21, the pivot rod 17 extending through these bars which form the connecting means between the pivot rod and chair back. These bars 2d also extend downwardly beyond the lower extremity of the downward extension 19 of the chair back 16 for a purpose which will presently appear.

The numeral 22 represents the upholstered seat part of the reclining chair and which can be of any suitable form to fit between the arms 6 of the chair base 5 with sufficient room at each side to accommodate the linkages as hereinafter described. Desirably, the seat part 22 is spring-filled so that a person either sitting upright or re clining on the seat part is resiliently and comfortably supported. A flat bar or metal strap 23 is secured to each side of the seat part 22 by screws 24- or in any other suitable manner, and these bars extend rearwardly from opposite sides of the seat part 22 to embrace opposite sides of the back part 36. T he rear extremity of eachof.

these bars 23 is journalled on the corresponding end of the cross rod 17 as best illustrated in Figs. 2 and 3. A second fiat bar or metal strap 25 is secured to each side of the seat part 22 by screws 2a or in any other suitable manner to extend upwardly from the forward end of the bar or strap 23. The bars 23, 25 could be made of one piece of metal strap material and the bars 25 extend along opposite sides of the upper front nose or corner 23 of the seat part 22, which nose or corner is forwardly extended to provide a recess 29in the front of the seat part 22 below the forwardly extended nose or corner 28. V p p This recess receives a leg rest part 31} which is prefer ably in the form of an upholstered rectangular frame and which serves as a horizontally extending leg rest part in the reclining position of the chair parts and as a vertical front panel of the base part 5 in the non-reclining position thereof.

For this purpose the leg rest part 30 is pivoted to bpp'osite sides of the forwardly projected nose 23 of the seat part 22. To this end a pair of arms 31 are provided, the opposite ends of which are connected with the seat and leg rest parts 22, 30, respectively, at opposite sides thereof. The end 32 of each arm 31 is of flat bar form and is pivoted, as, indicated at 33, to the corresponding side of the forwardly projected nose 28 of the seat part 22 to swing about an axis which is common to the two arms 31 and parallel with the axis of the pivot 17. This seat attachment end 32 is of arcuate form and the opposite or leg rest attachment end 34 of the arm 31 is of straight form and preferably tubular in cross section as best shown in Fig. 5. The overall shape of each arm 31 is that of a question mark with the straight or leg rest attachment end 34 arranged vertically and at the inner or rear part of the recess 29 when the chair parts are in their non-reclining position shown in Fig. 2.

While the straight or leg rest attachment end 34 of each arm 31 could be directly fixed to each side of the leg rest part 30, the leg rest part is shown as being extensible as the chair parts move to their reclining position and to this end the leg rest part 3% is shown as being slidably mounted on the straight tubular ends 34 of these arms. To this end a pair of bracket plates 35 are secured, as by screws 36, to the underside of the leg rest part 30, on each side thereof. Welded to the underside of each of these bracket plates 35 is a tube 37 which extends fore-and-aft of the chair and slidingly receives the straight tubular end 34 of the corresponding arm 31. Each bracket plate 35 is also provided along its outer side edge with a downwardly projecting car 38 for a purpose which will presently appear.

Counterpart linkages, of which one is illustrated, are provided at opposite sides of the chair to compel the back, seat and leg rest parts to move in unison, these linkages, in the erect position of these parts, being principally housed in the spaces between the arms 6 and the seat and back parts 22, 16. Each of these linkages includes an upwardly extending lever 40 pivoted at its lower end to the lower part of the seat part 22 toward the front end thereof as indicated at 41. As shown, desirably the pivots 41 are mounted on the meeting ends of the pairs of side bars or straps 23, 25 at each side of the seat part 22. The upper end of each upwardly extending lever 40 is pivoted, as indicated at 42, to the rear end of a relatively long horizontal link 43. The forward end of each horizontal link is pivoted, as indicated at 44, to an intermediate part of the corresponding arm 31. It will accordingly be seen that as the upwardly extending lever arm 40 is swung counterclockwise from the position shown in Fig. 2 to the position shown in Fig. 3, the leg rest part 30 is swung clockwise about its pivots 33 from a generally vertical to a generally horizontal forwardly projected position.

The forward end of a relatively short generally horizontal link 45 is pivotally connected, as indicated at 46, to an intermediate part of the corresponding upwardly extending lever 46. The rear end' of each horizontal link 45 is pivotally connected, as indicated at 48, to the upper end of a double ended or hell crank lever 49 which is pivoted near its center to the corresponding bar or strap 23, as indicated at 56, to swing about an axis 7 parallel with the pivot rod 17. The lower end of each double ended lever 49 is pivoted, as indicated at 51, to one end of a link or lever 52. The other end of each of these links or levers 52 is preferably fast to a pivot rod 4 spending fore-and-aft frame bars 8 of the chair base 5 as best shown in Fig. 4. D

A relatively long link 55 has its forward end supported by the corresponding pivot 48 and its rear end pivoted, as at 56, to the corresponding bar or strap 20 fixed to the back part 16.

To provide the extending movement of the leg rest part 30, short links 60 are severally pivoted, as indicated at 61, to the ears 38 depending from the bracket plates 35. The end of each link 60 is pivotally connected, as indicated at 62, to the upper end of a hornshaped lever arm or extension 63 of the corresponding link 43, this horn-shaped lever arm or extension 63 extending forwardly of the pivots 44 and at about a 45 angle upwardly with reference to the link 43. As hereinafter described, in the movement of the linkages from the position shown in Fig. 2 to the position shown in Fig. 3, this lever arm 63 is swung counterclockwise about the pivot axis 44 thereby to push on the link 60 and move the tubes 37 and hence brackets 35 and leg rest part 30 forwardly as this leg rest part swings upwardly.

Assuming that the chair is in the erect or non-reclining position in Figs. 1 and 2, in order to bring the chair to the reclining position shown in Fig. 3, all that is necessary is to move the back part 16 rearwardly. This can be done by sitting in the chair and forcing the back part 16 rearwardly, it being desirable to have a relatively small amount of resistance to movement of the chair so that some degree of deliberate force is needed to change the position of its parts.

So pushing back the rear part 16 draws the links 55 rearwardly, thereby to swing the double ended levers 49 counterclockwise, as viewed in Figs. 2 and 3, about the axis of the central pivots 50 which pivotally support these double ended levers 49 on the bars or metal straps 23 fixed to opposite sides of the seat part 22. The lower end of each double ended lever 49 connects Withthe corresponding lever or link 52 and since the other ends of these links or levers 52 are preferably fast to the rod 53 journalled in the base 5, at 54, such counterclockwise rotation of the double ended levers 49 about the pivot axis 50 serves to extend or straighten out the levers 49 and 52 with reference to each other so as to lift the forward end seat part 22 to the elevated position shown in Fig. 3.

This counterclockwise rotation of the double ended lever 49 about the pivot axis 50 also moves the links 45 forwardly thereby to swing the long lever 4t forwardly or counterclockwise about the pivot axis 41. This moves the link 43 forwardly thereby to swing the ques tion mark-shaped levers 31 clockwise about their pivot axis 33. This swings the leg rest part 33 to the horizontal position shown in Fig. 3.

At the same time, the link 43, in moving from the position of Fig. 2 to the position of Fig. 3, is rotated counterclockwise about its pivot 44 thereby to swing the lever arm or horn extension 63 also counterclockwise. This pushes on the link 60 and hence projects the brackets 35 forwardly as the foot rest part 34) swings upwardly, these brackets having the tubular sleeves 37 which slide upon the tubular extensions 34 of the question mark-shaped lever arms 31. It will therefore be seen that the upward movement of the seat and leg rest parts 22, 30 serves also to project the leg rest part 30 forwardly away from the nose 28 which forms the front upper corner of the seat part 22 thereby to support the users legs closer to the ankles and at the same time to avoid an objectionably high front panelfor the chair base when this leg rest part 30 is swung intothe recess 29 as shown in Figs. 1 and 2.

While the reclining chair forming the suoiect of the present invention has been shown in its two extreme positions, that is, fully erect or non-reclining in Figs. 1 and 2, and fully reclining in Figs. 3 and 4, it will be understood suit the comfort of the user and that this can be done while the user is seated or reclining in the chair. It will also be understood that the chair can be brought back to its fully erect or non-reclining position shown in Figs. 1 and 2 by forcing the leg rest part 30 downwardly while reclining on the chair and by the user shifting his body so as to transfer a part of his weight from the back part 16 to the front of the seat part 22, such shifting of the users weight, combined with the downward pressure on the leg rest part 30, serving to cause a reverse movement of the back, seat and leg rest parts and the linkages connecting the same.

In the reclining chair, certain geometric relations are, of course, important although not necessarily essential to the operation of the chair. Thus, it will be noted that the swinging movement of the back, seat and leg rest parts with reference to each other and to the base part 5 is under control of the double-ended levers 49 pivoted to the sides of the seat part 22 and moved by the relatively long links 55. Through the lever arms 52 journalled on the base 5, this lifts the front end of the seat part 22 as the back part 16 moves rearwardly. Also, the double ended levers 49, through the links 45, levers 40 and links 43, swing the leg rest part 30 from vertical to horizontal positions about the pivot axis 33 as the back and seat parts 16, 22 move from the erect position shown in Fig. 2 to the reclining position shown in Fig. 3. The horn 63 on the link 43 also serves to slide the tubular parts 37 of the leg rest part 30 along the straight tubular ends 34 of the lever arms 31 as the leg rest part 30 approaches its horizontal positon so as to bring this leg rest part 30 closer to the feet of the user.

From the foregoing, it will be seen that the present invention provides a simple and sturdy reclining chair of appealing appearance and which accomplishes the various objectives set forth.

We claim:

1. A reclining chair, comprising a base, a back part pivoted at its lower end to said base to swing about a horizontal transverse axis, a seat part pivoted at its rear end to said base to swing about a horizontal transverse axis, and a linkage interconnecting said back part and seat part to move in unison, comprising a pair of levers each of which is pivoted near its center to a side of said seat part to swing about a common axis parallel with said first axis, a first link at each side of said seat part and pivotally connected at one end to one end of said lever and pivotally connected at the other end with said base, a second link at each side of said seat part and pivotally connected at one end to the other end of said lever and pivotally connected at the other end with said back part in vertically spaced relation to said first axis, a leg rest part, a lever arm connected to said leg rest part at each side thereof and extending to embrace opposite sides of the upper front corner of said seat part, means pivotally connecting said lever arms to said upper front corner of said seat part to swing about a common axis generally parallel with said first axis, a pair of second levers each being connected at its lower end to said seat part, a third link connecting the upper end of each of said second levers with corresponding one of said lever arms, and a fifth link connecting the middle portion of each second lever with the end portion of the first lever having connection with said second link, all being arranged so that said leg rest part is swung toward a horizontal position in response to upward movement of said seat part.

2. A reclining chair as set forth in claim 1 wherein means slidingly support said leg rest part on said lever arms for movement toward and from said seat part, and wherein each of said third links is provided with a laterally extending horn, and wherein a fourth link connects each of said horns with said leg rest part to slidingly move said leg rest part along said lever arms in response to upward movement of said seat part.

3. A reclining chair, comprising a base, a horizontal rod mounted at its ends on opposite sides of said base and extending transversely across the rear part thereof, a back part pivoted at its lower end on said rod, a seat part, bars fixed to opposite sides of said seat part and extending rearwardly therefrom and journalled on opposite ends of said rod at opposite sides of said back part, and a linkage interconnecting said back part and seat part to move in unison, comprising a pair of bell crank levers each of which is pivoted near its center directly to a corresponding one of said bars to swing about a common axis parallel with said rod, a first link at each side of said seat part and pivotally connected at one end directly to one end of said bell crank lever and pivotally connected at the other end directly with said base, a second link on each side of said seat part and pivotally connected at one end directly to the lower end of said bell crank lever and pivotally connected at the other end directlywith said back pant in vertically spaced relation to said rod.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 652,801 Moore July 3, 1900 2,660,225 Luckhardt Nov. 24, 1953 2,663,357 Belisle Dec. 22, 1953 2,670,030 Richardson Feb. 23, 1954 2,743,764 Lorenz May 1, 1956 2,750,988 Luckhardt June 19, 1956 2,857,955 De Vries Oct. 28, 1958 2,870,821 Luckhardt Jan. 27, 1959 FOREIGN PATENTS 683,042 Great Britain Nov. 19, 1952

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US652801 *Oct 20, 1899Jul 3, 1900John T MooreChair.
US2660225 *May 23, 1952Nov 24, 1953Anton LorenzArticle of repose for supporting the body of a person
US2663357 *Apr 23, 1952Dec 22, 1953Berkline CorpReclining chair
US2670030 *Apr 30, 1953Feb 23, 1954Franklin RichardsonReclining article of furniture
US2743764 *Oct 22, 1952May 1, 1956Lorenz AutonArticle of repose for supporting the body of a person
US2750988 *Dec 28, 1954Jun 19, 1956Norman P MartinArticle of repose for supporting the body of a person
US2857955 *May 18, 1954Oct 28, 1958Vries Nicholas DeReclining chair
US2870821 *Oct 21, 1954Jan 27, 1959Norman P MartinReclining article of repose for supporting the body of a person
GB683042A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3069201 *Mar 30, 1961Dec 18, 1962Dual Mfg & Engineering IncReclining chair
US3157431 *Aug 5, 1963Nov 17, 1964Anton LorenzReclining chair of the multiple movement type
US3572823 *Jan 3, 1969Mar 30, 1971Lear Siegler IncReclining chair
US5013084 *Apr 6, 1989May 7, 1991Action Industries, Inc.Mechanism for high-leg reclining chair
US7261367Sep 5, 2001Aug 28, 2007Robert Barron DuncanMethod and apparatus for a three position wall-avoiding reclining chair
WO2002021973A1 *Sep 5, 2001Mar 21, 2002American LeatherMethod and apparatus for a three position wall-avoiding reclining chair
Classifications
U.S. Classification297/84
International ClassificationA47C1/0355
Cooperative ClassificationA47C1/0355
European ClassificationA47C1/0355