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Publication numberUS2973119 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateFeb 28, 1961
Filing dateApr 15, 1957
Priority dateApr 15, 1957
Publication numberUS 2973119 A, US 2973119A, US-A-2973119, US2973119 A, US2973119A
InventorsO'c Parker Brooks
Original AssigneeO'c Parker Brooks
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Portable container for liquids
US 2973119 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Feb. 28, 1961 B. o'c. PARKER PORTABLE CONTAINER FOR LIQUIDS 3 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed April 15, 1957 Feb. 28, 1961 B. o'c. PARKER PORTABLE CONTAINER FOR LIQUIOs 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed April 15,- 1957 B. OC. PARKER PORTABLE CONTAINER FOR LIQUIDS Feb. 28, 1961 3 Sheets-Sheet 5 Filed April l5, 1957 /I- f@ f5 hired The invention is concerned with a portable container for shipping and storing flowable bulk materials in comparatively large quantities. Various features and characteristics render the container advantageous for somewhat general use, including use for bulk powdered or granular materials, but as embodying an inner plastic bag element it is particularly useful as a container for liquids.

A commercially practical container must meet various diticult problems and conditions including factors of cost in initial manufacture and shipping, space occupied in proportion to the liquid quantity, compliance with railroad and government regulations and other con-l ditions. Powdered or granular materials have been shipped to a large extent in multi-wall paper bags sizes 50 to 10() lbs. capacity. In many cases these are moved and shipped individually, but in attempts to gain greater handling efficiency they are frequently placed on pallets and moved in groups which, however, requires the expenditure of considerable time and labor in lilling and emptying the bags and securing them on the pallets by various means such as steel strapping or by gluing. `In efforts to avoid the disadvantages of bags such containers as spiral wound paper drums, steel drums, and barrels have been resorted to but these also have their disadvantages including factors of cost, and ineiicient use of space due to the cylindrical shape. In the case of liquids a common type container heretofore employed for the purpose has been the steel drum utilized in Various sizes of which the approximately 55 gallon capacity is in the intermediate range and probably the most cornmonly used. The initial costs of such type drums are relatively high and economical considerations therefore require that they be reused with consequent delays and inconveniences, and added costs for return shipment.

It is an object of the present invention to provide a container which meets the requirements in a practical manner and which includes the features of being light weight but of adequate strength and of such low initial cost as to render them expendable, that is of one-time use where conditions 'make it desirable. The construction embodies the features of an outer shell of light weight paperboard material such as corrugated paper and, in the case particularly of liquids, an inner container in the form of a bag of thin flexible plastic material such as polyethylene. The functions of strength and liquid barrier, which are necessarily combined in one metal wall in the case of a steel drum, in lthe present case are sepa` rately provided. The outer shell of paperboard is designed and shaped, in such a manner yas to provide adequate strength and retain the initial shape; and the liquid barrier or container can therefore be made of light weight plastic material and adapted to conform fully with the shape of the outer strength providing shell. A suitable flexible inner liner may also be employed in the case of powdered material where circumstances make it desirable.

An important feature of the invention comprises the rares Parent ice rnanner in which the paperboard materials are initially shaped and thereafter assembled to result in a light weight but exceptionally strong container adapted to cope with the forces normally exhibited by confined liquid or other owable materials. The relation of the parts enables the container to be made of polygonal shape in horizontal section, such as square shape, and retain that shape against the normal tendency of liquid to cause the confining container to assume a generally round shape. The square shape is of considerable advantage in initial fabrication and in handling and storage, and makes for economy of space since it eliminates the voids necessarily resulting between containers of barrel shape. The present container has the advantages that in the initial manufacture the parts may be stamped out and scored in at blank form and shipped to the user in quantities in such knocked-downform and thereafter readily assembled by the user as needed by simple operations.

The construction includes various elements and features which contribute to the strength and rigidity and general practicability and which will be described or made apparent from a consideration of the particular examples exemplifying the invention hereinafter described. Certain combinations and features covered herein are disclosed in my prior application Serial No. 631,619, tiled December 3l, 1956, now abandoned, of which this application is a continuation-in-part.

For a fuller understanding of the nature and objects of the invention reference should be had to the following detailed description taken in connection with the accompanying drawings, in which:

Fig. 1 is a View in perspective of one form ofra complete assembled container representative of the invention;

Fig. 2 is a view in perspective of the outer shell in erect condition but not assembled;

Fig. 3 is a view in perspective of one form of interliner;

Fig. 4 is a View in lperspective of the top cover in at blank form prior to folding into shape;

Fig. 5 is a similar view of the bottom pyramidal interliner;

Fig. 6 is a vertical cross sectional view of the assernbled container taken on the line 6-6 of Fig. 1;

Fig. 7 is a horizontal cross sectional view taken on the line 7-7 of Fig. 6;

Fig. 8 is a perspective view in partially exploded form showing the relation of the shell and interliner and bottom'closure;

Fig. 9 is a fragmentary top view showing particularly the pouring spout;

Fig. 10 is a vertical sectional view taken on the line 10-10 of Fig. 9;

Fig. 1lis a fragmentary view showing the character of the preferred form of paperboard and may be considered as taken on the line 11-11 of Fig. 3;

Fig. l2 is a fragmentary ihorizontal section in diagrammatic form of the outer sleeve and form of interliner pictured in Fig. 3 showing the direction and distribution of the forces involved.

Fig. 13 is a vertical view of a section of another form of interliner blank in flattened form;

Fig. 14 is a view in perspective of the complete interliner for the vertical walls embodying a pair of sections like that of Fig. 13 and showing the pyramidal shape;

Fig. 15 is a view in perspective of a bottom pyramidal interliner section adapted to be employed with the vertical wall interliners of Fig. 14; and

Fig. 16 is a top plan view of an assembled container embodying an outer shell such as that shown in Fig. 2 and. interliners like those of Figs. 14 and 15. n

Referring now to the details ofthe particular container construction depicted in Figs. l'to 11 of the drawings, it

includes an outer main sleeve which in assembled form is rectangular in horizontal cross section and for most purposes preferably square. In the manufacture thereof it may be a single continuous sheet with appropriate score lines to form'the three corners and thefour panel sections, the two ends being suitably secured together at the fourth corner by any desired practical means such as by providing an extension 11 and stapling it to the adjacent'panel of -the sleeve as indicated atV 11a. For shipment in knocked-down fashion the outer sleeve section may be folded down in flat form and a plurality thereof arranged in a stack. The shell blank includes apair' of opposed bottom flaps 12 and another pair 'of opposed bottom aps l13 depending from the respective panel sections 10a and formed by score lines, such as those indicated at 12a and 13a, and by cut out corners as indicated at 14.V The shell'also includes a pair ofv opposed top flaps 15 and anotherpair of opposed aps 16 formed as extensions of therespective panel sections 10a. In this case two spaced score lines are provided for each flap such asthose indicated atl a to accommodate an intervening layer of paperboard when the flaps 15 are folded downwardly as indicated in Fig. 6 for example and as will be described more fully hereinafter.

The particular material of which the outer main sleeve 1,0 is composed may vary dependent upon circumstances but paperboard is designated as particularly practical for thel purpose. The paperboard .may be of any common l material suitable for that purpose and of standard thickness and it is intended that lthe term paperboard include various types of composition sheet material which are light weight and capable of beingV scored and folded in the manner indicated. It may comprise one of various kinds of cellulose materials impregnated with plastic materials or not impregnated, or it may comprise an appropriate plastic sheet material and include if desired reinforcement. However, corrugated paperboard is particularly advantageous for the purpose since Vit provides high-strength and rigidity relative to the weight andcost and the corrugations or utes may be selectively arrangedso as to meet best the particular stressconditions, as Will be pointed out in more detail hereinafter.' A

A bottom interliner is shown particularly Vin initial unassembled form in Fig. 5 at 2.0.V As originally stamped out in at rform the blank has a triangular cut out 21 which may be at a corner but preferably is cut out from one of the side edges as shown. Thescore lines 22 lead kfrom an apex 23 to each of the four corners. The side edge portions 24 andV 25 have 'a combined length equal to vone of thev other three edges assuming that the particular container is generally square in shape withrequal sides. The edges, including the combined edge formed by the partial edges 24 and 25, are each slightly greater in length than the'inner ywidth of a panel section 10a of the outer sleeve, and the scoring and general proportions of the blank 20 are such that when the blank is folded with the cut out portion 21 closed and the edges 24 and 25 become one continuous edge, the blank assumes a generally pyramidal shape as indicated for example in Fig. 6. This results in a distribution of forces in a particular manner and of particular advantage, as will be described more fully below. Preferably the bottom member 20 is comprised of corrugated paperboard and with the corrugations extending in the direction indicated by the double arrowv26 in Fig. 5. The bottom closure is further formed -by folding inwardly at right angles to the outer sleeve panels 10a, first the ilaps 13, and then the ilaps 12, and securing the parts in position by suitable means liner may Ibe made of one continuous strip with appropriate score lines similarly to the outer sleeve, or of separate individual sections, or a plurality thereof up to the required number of four. As indicated particularly in Fig. 3, the interliner is made of two sections each embodying two panel portions 31. The interliner is made of paperboard similarly to the outer sleeve and corrugated paperboard is particularly advantageous. The width in horizontal direction of each of the panel 'sections 31 is slightly greater than the corresponding inner Width of the outer sleeve panel section 10a and each section of the interlner is provided with a vertical score line 32 located at substantially its mid portion whereby Veach panel section of the interliner when assembled within the outer sleeve 10 has a shape in the nature of a prismatic truss which in the vform being described is triangular in horizontal section as indicated particularly in Fig. 7. It will be noted that the vertical side edges 33 of the truss are cornpressed intol the corners of the outer sleeve when the container is lled. The corrugations or utes 34 of the paperboard in the interliner sections 31 are arranged preferably horizontally as indicated by the fragmentary vertical section of Fig. ll taken on the line 11,-11 of Fig. 3, and also as indicated by the double arrow 35 in Fig. 3.

The particular container illustrated is rectangular in cross section and more exactly is a square. It will be understood, however, that other at sided polygons such as a container of hexagonal shape in horizontal section could be employed, in which case there would of course be six of the interliner panel sections 31.

The container may be used either for flowable powd ered' or granular materials or for liquids. An inner liner such as a flexible bag may be needed for some powdered materials. The drawings illustrate the container adapted for liquids and within the container and interiorly of the interliner 36 is located Va fluid receptacle in the for-m of a closed bag 4u, the bag being comprised of suitable relatively strong but thin flexible plastic material. Polyethylene is particularly good for the purpose. The bag is made of ample size and shape, and being of such plastic material, when filled Vwith liquid it expands outwardly and closely conforms to the interior shape of the container as a whole. The liquid receptacle 46 includes a pouring spout or neck 41 suitably located and secured in the top portion thereof. As shown in larger proportions in Fig. l0 the spout comprises a length of rigid tubing inserted into a hole in the upper layer ofthe bag 49, the bag being provided with a circular lip or Vtube portion 42 extend-ing around the bottom end of the tube 4l and secured thereto by any suitable means such as by cementing, and if desired additional securing means may be provided in the form of wires 43 clamped around the sleeve portion 42. The spout 41 may have annular such as stapling 27 as indicated in Fig. 6. The' botgrooves therein as shown into which the sleeve portion 42 is compressed by the outer clamping rings 43. The spout 41 is provided with a suitable closure which may comprise a screw cap as indicated at ,44.

The spout 41 is adapted to beV slidably received in a main cover or top closure 59 for t-he outer shell which will now be described in more detail.. The cover is initially stamped out of a flat section of paperboard and as a blank has a shape corresponding to that indicated in Fig. 4. The blank is generally square withportions adapted to form a skirt comprising the sections 51 at each of the four sides defined by score lines 52. A slit 53 is cut at each of the four corners to enable portions 51 to be folded down as a skirt and Vscore lines 54, dene triangular tab portions 55 adapted to be folded around over or underneath the adjacent skirt portion and secured thereto as by stapling 55 shown in Fig. l. Ex tending from each of the skirt portions 51 is a tab 57 denedby spaced score lines 58 and 59. The cover has an opening 60 Vtherein adapted to accommodate the pour ingspout 41 of the inner liquid container. Preferably for .this purpose the opening 64) is made considerably larger than the diameter of the spout 41 and a pair of dish shaped annular members 61 are secured in the opening 60 with the sheet material of the top 50l clamped between complemental tlange portions 62 of the dish shaped members 61. As a convenient manner of assembly and securing the dish shaped members in place, they may be provided with a screw-threaded connection as indicated at 63, the lower member 61 having a tubular threaded portion received in a threaded opening of the upper member 61. The spout 41 is designed to have a relatively free sliding nt within the cover 50 and since the material of the bag 4t) is iiexible the spout 41 norrnally may be depressed to a position where the top of the cap 42 i-s flush with or below the upper surface of the member 50 as shown in full line in Fig. 6, or, for pouring or filling purposes, may be lifted outwardly to the position shown in full line in Fig. and in broken `line in Fig. 6. With the spout 41 pushed downwardly into the depression, the containers may be stacked as indicated in Fig. 6 with the complete container there shown sitting on another container indicated in broken lines at 65.

ln securing the cover 50 on the container, the cover ymay be initially folded and shaped into the form shown in Fig. l, except lwit-h the tabs 57 remaining unfolded and extending downwardly. Before applying the cover to the outer sleeve 10 the flaps 15 and 16 of the sleeve are bent around downwardly to the position shown, for example, in Fig. 6 and as indicated by the ap- 16' in Fig. 8. The cover 50` is then applied over the outer sleeve 10 and the tabs 57 tucked inwardly and up to the position shown in Fig. 6 and stapling applied as indicated at 57a in Fig. 1. It will be noted that the tab 57 are of less length in the horizontal direction than the skirt portions 51 and terminate some distance from the respective corners, thereby to permit more readily the tabs to be tricked upwardly into the space between the corresponding flap or 16 of the outer sleeve 1G. The cover is thereby firmly interlocked with the sleeve 10 and if desired the container may be lifted by hooking a tool under the lower edge of the skirt portion of the cap. Tools of that character are well known such as the chisel shaped element `66, indicated in broken line in Fig. 10, which may be mounted on a power fork lift.

The functioning of the container with respect to the resistance to forces imposed thereon when the container is kfilled with a ilowable material will now be described particularly in connection with Fig. 12. In the case of a liquid the container will include, of course, the inner fiexible bag. In a representative liquid container the dimensions thereof may be such that the four panels of the outer sleeve 10 have a width of about 2l inches and a height of about 34 inches. In the case of powdered or granular material the size would commonly be a little larger, as forexantple, about 35 inches wide and about 48 inches high. As has been indicated, the interliner panels have a total width in over-all flattened condition somewhat greater than the inside diameter of the outer sleeve 10 or, in other words, greater than the inner width of a sleeve section 10a between the adjacent sections of thesleeve. Accordingly the interliner panel sections 31 will initially assume a shape somewhat as shown in Fig. 7. With respect to any selected interliner panel 31 such as. that diagrammatically indicated in Fig. 12 the liquid container bag being flexible the result will be substantially the same as iff the liquid were acting directly on the interliner panel 31 and there will be outwardly acting forces against the panel 31 as indicated by the arrows 70 and 71. The dimensions and relations may be varied somewhat dependent upon particular circumstances, but in a container of the size and shape described above the apex A corresponding to the score line 32 of the panel 31 may be spaced initially from the outer shell wall 10a a distance of about 2 inches, or perhaps about -3 6 inches if the container is on the larger order noted above for powdered materials. The forces 70 and 71 acting outwardly on the section 31 will tend to atten out the sheet to a shape and position indicated generally by the broken line 31a and squeezing the side edges 33 into the corners of the outer sleeve. The forces 70` and 71 create bending stresses `in the horizontal direction in the interliner sections and forces 70 also produce a component of compression acting in section AB as indicated by arrow 72. A resultant force is imposed on the outer sheet 10 at B at some angular direction depending upon the circurnstances but indicated generally by the line 73. The force 73 is counteracted by tension forces 74 and 75 in the outer 'walls BC and BD respectively. Similar effects occur at each of the panels and at each of the corners.

The arrangement therefore makes exceptionally efficient use of the paperboard material. The flutes of the corrugated paper of the interliner panels are arranged horizontally and provide the maximum strength to resist the bending and compression stresses. Furthermore the interliner sections are in effect divided into two relatively narrow panels each having a width extending from the' score line 32 or apex A to the respective inside corner of the container. The horizontal forces exerted on the panel sections of the outer sleeve are substantially all tension forces which the sheet material is well able to withstand. Accordingly the utes in the outer sleeve 10 may extend vertically and arranged therefore to withstand the maximum compression forces in the vertical direction and provide additional strength for stacking of the containers. The bottom flaps 12 and 13 being folded and arranged at right angles to the sides act as horizontal beams and contribute substantially to the resistance to outward bowing of the sides particularly at the bottom where the pressure of the head of liquid is the greatest. The container therefore retains its original square shape with very little distortion. When the container is iilled with a fluid, that is a liquid or owable solid particles, the distance of the apex A from the outer wall will be reduced a small amount due to such factors as compression of the edges 33I into the corners and the slight compressibility in general of the material. In the example given Where the distance initially was 2 inches it would be reduced to about 11/2 inches, and the total blank unoccupied space between the interliners 31 and the outer shell would amount to not more than about 11%. However, the square containers can be arranged closely adjacent in storage or shipment and the 11% waste space is far less than the overall waste space when cylindrical containers, for example, are employed.

The forces and resultant stress effects described above with respect to side pressures apply also to the conditions at the bottom ofthe container with respect to the bottom member 20. In fact Fig. l2 could be regarded as a vertical section taken through the bottom with the apex A in Fig. l2 corresponding to the apex 23 of the pyramidally shaped bottom member 20 and the side edges 33 of Fig. 12 corresponding to the bottom side edges of the pyramid. The weight of the liquid inthe bag 49 produces forces acting on the bottom 20 similar to those indicated at 70` and 71 with a resultant 73 at the bottom edges of the outer shell sections 10a. The resultant force 73 is counteracted by horizontal tension forces in the sides and bottom flaps of the outer shell, and of course by pressure from the supporting surface on which the container rests. The sides and bottom of the container, therefore, in eect comprise prismatic trusses having planar areas adjoining ones of which meet at an apex which projects inwardly of the container and function similarly to a bridge truss as above described.

If the container is lifted by the top, for example, free of any bottom supporting surface the vertical forces, comprising the weight of the liquid, are supported by tension in side walls of the shell. In this respect it may be noted that the weight of the liquid is transferred' through the pyramidally shaped bottom member to the bottom aps of the outer shell 10 immediately adjacent the vertical Wall sectionsk thereof and there is no substantial pressure exerted on the bottom apsthroughout the central horizontal area.

As# has been mentioned, among other advantages, the construction and relation of parts enables the containers to be shipped in a compact substantially flat knockeddown form and easily and quickly assembled at the point of use. As will be apparent from Figs. 2 to 5 inclusive, each of the parts may be shipped in at formV and with a plurality of like parts arranged in a stack.

In the container construction thus far described the side interliner is of a simple geometric form, with a uniform triangular shape in horizontal cross section. Various other prismatic truss shapes may be employed which also function similarly to a bridge truss. In Figs. 13, 14 and 16 an interliner for the sides of pyramidal shape is shown. As in the previous form the interliner may be made as a separate panel for each side or with a plurality of panels connected together. Advantageously the interliner is made of two like sections 80 and 81 each of two panels 82. Fig. 13 shows the section 80 in attened form and provided with score lines at 83 and 84 and with a cut out triangular area 85. The shape and proportions of the panels areV such with relation to the outer sleeve panels that when the interliner panels are squeezed into Vplace between the corresponding sides of the outer shell laterally and between the top and bottom closures vertically, they assume a pyramidal shape as indicated in Fig. 14, with the triangular gap 8S completely closed. Each panel is comprised of four atrplanes or planar areas which are inclined inwardly from the outer shell and adjoining pairs of planar areas meet in an angle of less than 180 at a common peak line or apex defined by the respective score lines 83 and 84 which in turn meet at acomrnon point apex 86. Each section preferably is provided with a ap extension 87 at one side adapted to overlap the inner surface of the adjoining'panel 82 of the other section as indicated particularly in Fig. 16.

The bottom interliner section 88 is likewise of pyramidal shape and may be formed similarly to the bottom member 20 shown in Fig. 5. In Fig. 15 the blank is shown compressed into the ultimate pyramidal shape.Y

The side interliner sections and the bottom interliner section of the form of container of Figs. 13 to 16 may be made of various materials as indicated in connection with the previous form but corrugated paperboard is particularly advantageous and the utes in such case are arranged as indicated by the arrows 89` for the vertical panels, and as indicated at 90 for the bottom section.

The outer sleeve or shell of the complete container may be like the shell 1d of Figs. 1 and 2, and the cover or top closure may be like that of Figs. 1` and 4 including the provision for the pouring neck of an inner bag where one is employed.

Fig. 16 is a top plan view looking down on a complete assembled container except the cover has not been applied and the iiaps and 16 of the outer shell 10 are turned outwardly into horizontal position. The assembly may of course include an inner exible liner.

It should be noted that Vthe interliner sections all comprise prismatic trusses and function similarly to a bridge truss. The planar areasY conjointly make up a complete enclosure and have contiguous outer edges. Pres# sures on the interior are transferred through the planar areas of the panels to the outer edges which engage along lines comprisingthe vertical corners of the'outer sleeve and similarly at the bottom andV top. TheV forces in the interliner including the bottom interliner are for the most part compression forces with` some bending stresses. Therbottom edge of each panel section `82 has a full line engagement with theouter shell and the pressure because-ot the static head of the contents is a maximum along that line and normally would tend vto bow out- Wardly the sides of the outer shell, but the bottom tiap portions of the outer shell being bent around into horizontal position provide a beam construction and the maximum resistance at that region to distortion from the rectangular shape of the container.

The interliners may be comprised of various other relations of planar areas arranged in prismatic truss form and adapted to function similarly to bridge or roof trusses. For example the upper portion of the panel section could be similar to the upper portion of the panels 82 and the lower portion similar in shape to that of the panels 31 of Fig. 3, that is of continuous triangular shape in horizontal section from the apex point 86 downwardly. The same type of panel section could be employed reversed end for end with the split portion characterized Y by the notch 85 in Fig. 13 arranged at the bottom.

Various changes may be made in the particular constructions described herein without departing from the scope of the invention, and it is intended that all matter contained in the above description or shown in the accompanying drawings shall be interpreted as illustrative and not in a limiting sense.

I claim:

1. A container comprising an outer sleeve of sheet material having a polygonal shape in horizontal cross section with vertical wall sections, said sleeve having bottom flaps folded inwardly, and a bottom part for said container folded and arranged in a generally pyramidal shape having an apex at substantially the center of a horizontal section of the container with a portion sloping downwardly and outwardly from the apex to each of said wall sections and each said portion having an outer bottom edge substantially coextensive with the inner width of the corresponding wall section and positioned over the corresponding iap area.

2. A container comprising an outer sleeve of paperboard shaped and proportioned substantially as a square in horizontal cross section with vertical wall sections, said sleeve having bottom aps folded inwardly, and a bottom part for said container folded and arranged in the form of a pyramid having an apex at substantially the center in horizontal plan of the container with a triangularly shaped portion sloping downwardly and outwardly from the apex to each of said Wall sections and having an outer bottom edge substantially coextensive with the inner width of the corresponding wall section and positioned over the corresponding ap area.

3. A container comprising an outer sleeve of sheet material having a polygonal shape in horizontal cross section with Vertical wall sections, each section having a bottom flap folded inwardly at right angles to the section. and a bottom part of sheet material folded and arranged in a generally pyramidal shape with a flat portion sloping downwardly and outwardly to each of said Wall sections each of said portions having a side edge substantially coextensive with the inner width of the corresponding wall section and positioned over the said flap of said section.

l4. A container comprising an outer sleeve of paperboard with vertical wall sections and of rectangular shape in horizontal cross section, a reinforcing interliner within said sleeve embodying a panel section of paperboard located adjacent each outer wall section each said panel section being scored along a vertically extending line at its mid portion and spaced inwardlyzat said mid portion from the corresponding wall of the outer sleeve, the portions at each side of said mid portion being inclined toreach other and having a vertical side edge engaged into the corresponding spaced corner of the outer sleeve, and a bottom part for said container of paperboard folded and arranged in a generally pyramidal shape with a portion extending downwardly and outwardly from the center to each of said wall sections and having a bottom outer edge substantially coextensive with the width of the corresponding Wall section.

5. A container comprising an outer sleeve of paperboard with vertical wall sections and of polygonal shape in horizontal cross section, a reinforcing interliner within said sleeve embodying a panel section of paperboard located adjacent each outer wal-l section each said panel section being comprised of planar portions joined at score lines and inclined outwardly from a mid portion of the panel, said mid portion being spaced inwardly from the corresponding wall section of the outer sleeve, the panel having vertical side edges each engaged into a corner between wall sections of the outer sleeve, a bottom part for said container of paperboard folded and arranged in a generally pyramidal shape with an upwardly extending peak at substantially the center of said part and a planar portion extending downwardly and outwardly from said peak to each of said wall sections and each planar section having a bottom outer edge substantially coextensive with the width of the corresponding wall section, and an inner bag unit of flexible plastic material adapted to hold liquid and of a size and character to flex freely into engagement with the inner surfaces of said interliner and said bottom part.

6. A container of polygonal shape in horizontal cross section with flat vertical wall sections, a bottom closure therefor, and a top closure, said wall sections each having an extension bent outwardly and downwardly into substantially parallel relation with the main wall section, and said top closure including downwardly bent skirt portions at each side wall section with tabs at the ends of certain skirt portio-ns at least overlapping and secured to the end of an adjacent skirt portion to form closed corners and a continuous skirt portion around the top, and a narrowed tongue extending from each skirt portion with its ends spaced a considerable distance from the corresponding ends of the skirt portion at the corners said tongue being adapted to be tucked upwardly between the corresponding wall section and its said downwardly bent extension.

7. A container for liquids comprising -an outer sleeve of paperboard and of polygonal shape in horizontal cross section with ilat vertical wall sections, a bottom closure, a top closure of paperboard, a reinforcing interliner within said sleeve embodying a panel section located adjacent each outer wall section, each said panel section having a width in flattened condition greater than the width of the corresponding wall section of the outer sleeve, and in assembled position having its mid portion spaced inwardly from the outer Wall with its vertical edges engaged into the corresponding spaced corners of the outer sleeve, and an inner bag unit of flexible material adapted to hold liquid, a spout sealed into an opening in the top of said bag and adapted to extend upwardly through said top closure, said top closure having a generally cup shaped depression extending below the upper surface thereof with an opening through which said spout extends in slidable relation therewith, said spout being adapted selectively to be pulled upwardly beyond the upper surface of said top closure or pushed down into said cup shaped depression.

8. A container for liquids comprising an outer sleeve of paperboard and of rectangular shape in horizontal cross section with flat vertical wall sections, a bottom closure, a top closure of paperboard, a reinforcing interliner within said sleeve embodying a panel section located -adjacent each outer wall section, each said panel section being comprised of corrugated paperboard with the corrugations arranged horizontally and each being scored along a vertically extending line at its mid portion and having a width in tlattened condition greater than the width of the corresponding wall section of the outer sleeve, and in assembled position having its vertically extending mid portion at said score line spaced inwardly from the outer wall with its vertical edges engaged into the corresponding spaced corners of the outer sleeve,

and an inner bag unit of flexible material adapted to hold liquid, a spout sealed into an opening in the top of said bag and adapted to extend upwardly through said top closure, said top closure having a generally cup shaped depression extending below the upper surface thereof with an opening through which said spout extends in slidable relation therewith, said spout being adapted selectively to be pulled upwardly beyond the upper surface of said top closure or pushed down into said cup shaped depression.

9. A container having an outer enclosing shell of paperboard including a planar wall section polygonal in shape, and an inner reinforcing panel section of paperboard adjacent said wall section, said panel section being comprised of a plurality of triangular portions each with a base edge adjacent to and substantially co-extensive with one edge of the wall section and inclined inwardly of the container the triangular portions meeting at a common inwardly projecting point to form a pyramidally shaped panel.

10. A container having an outer enclosing shell with vertical planar wall sections, andan interliner with a panel section adjacent each wall section, each panel section being comprised of triangular planar portions each being inclined inwardly from an outer base edge of the triangle and the portions meeting at a common inwardly projecting point to form a pyramidally shaped section.

11. A container comprising an outer shell of paperboard polygonal in horizontal cross section with vertical wall sections, and an interliner with a panel adjacent each wall section, each panel being comprised of triangular planar portions, each portion being inclined inwardly from an outer base edge of the triangle arranged at the outer shell section and the portions meeting at a common inwardly projecting point, adjacent planar portions being joined laterally along a preformed score line and arranged at an angle to each other, said panels thereby being each generally shaped in the form of a pyramid.

12. A container comprising an outer shell of paperboard polygonal in horizontal cross section with vertical wall sections, an interliner with apanel adjacent each wall section, each panel being comprised of triangular planar portions, cach portion being inclined inwardly from an outer base edge of the triangle arranged at the outer shell section and the portions meeting at a common inwardly projecting point, adjacent planar portions being joined laterally along a preformed score line and arranged at an angle to each other, said panels thereby being each generally shaped in the form of a pyramid, and an inner bag unit of flexible material adapted to hold liquid land to flex freely into engagement with the inner surface of said interliner.

13. Acontainer comprising an outer sleeve of paperboard with vertical wall sections and of polygonal shape in horizontal cross section with llat vertical sides, a reinforcing interliner withinsaid sleeve embodying a panel section of corrugated paperboard located adjacent each outer wall section the corrugations extending in a horizontal direction, each said panel section being scored along a vertically extending line at its mid portion and spaced inwardly at said mid portion from the corresponding wall of the outer sleeve, the portions at each side of said mid portion being inclined to each other and having a vertical side edge engaged into the corresponding spaced corner of the outer sleeve, and an inner bag unit of exible plastic material adapted to hold liquid and of a size and character to ex freely and when lled with liquid to engage with the inner surface of said interliner throughout the peripheral extent.

14. A container having an outer shell including a planar section polygonal in shape, and an inner reinforcing panel section located adjacent said planar section,

comprising a sheet of material of polygonal shape provided with score lines extending radially outward from a 1 1 central point and dividing the sheet into triangular planar areas with their apexes at said point and each having a base located adjacent to and substantially coextensive with one'edge of said planar section of the outer she'lL/and Y Schrfndt Feb' 27' i said sheet as preformed having a triangular cut-out open- 5 'Y v vobmson "7""i`""l?ec` 1932 ing between two of said planar areas with its apex at said 2f 6 61128 Riagg] IODVC 1 point, said planar areas being bent at an angle to each 2715980 Frick "'Aug. '23 other at the respective intervening score line and said 28'07402 Nelbac'h" Sept 24 opening being closedwhereby the panel section has a generally pyramidal shape with a peak at said point and 10 FOREIGN PATENTS Great Britain Nov. 5,

triangular sloping sides.

sir-5,721

References Cited in the'le of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS

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Classifications
U.S. Classification222/131, 229/116, 229/125.26, 222/540, 229/117.3, 222/525, 229/125.14
International ClassificationB65D77/06
Cooperative ClassificationB65D77/065
European ClassificationB65D77/06B2