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Publication numberUS2973688 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 7, 1961
Filing dateMay 12, 1958
Priority dateMay 12, 1958
Publication numberUS 2973688 A, US 2973688A, US-A-2973688, US2973688 A, US2973688A
InventorsBilibok Dezso
Original AssigneeBilibok Dezso
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Adjustable pattern projecting machine
US 2973688 A
Images(6)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

March 7, 1961 D. BILIBOK 2,973,588

ADJUSTABLE PATTERN PROJECTING MACHINE Filed May 12, 1958 6 Sheets-Sheet 1 Fig.9

INVENTOR. Dezso BIIIbOk March 7, 1961 D. BILIBOK 2,973,688

ADJUSTABLE PATTERN PROJECTING MACHINE Filed May 12, 1 958 6 Sheets-Sheet 2 INV E NTOR. Dezso BIIIbOk WWW March 7, 1961 D. BILIBOK ADJUSTABLE PATTERN PROJECTING MACHINE 6 Sheets-Sheet 3 Filed May 12, 1958 n r n I W HH III INVENTOR. Dezso Bilibok March 7, 1961 D. BILIBOK 2,973,683

ADJUSTABLE PATTERN PROJECTING MACHINE Filed May 12, 1958 6 Sheets-Sheet 4 March 7, 1961 D. BILIBOK 2,973,688

ADJUSTABLE PATTERN PROJECTING MACHINE Filed May 12, 1958 6 Sheets-Sheet 5 Fig. I2

INVENTOR. Dezso Bilibok March 7, 1961 D. BILIBOK 2,973,688

ADJUSTABLE PATTERN PROJECTING MACHINE Filed May 12, 1958 6 Sheets-Sheet 6 INVFNTOR. DeZSO Blllbok BY WW ADJUSTABLE PATTERN PROJECTING MACHINE The present invention relates to the manufacture of garments.

Most garments, such as mens suits, coats or trousers, are made by sewing together component parts thereof that have been cut from a large piece of cloth. The number and approximate contours of these parts follow accepted standards, that is to say, a certain type of garment such as a pair of trousers, a jacket or a coat is usually composed of the same number of component parts and these parts are of identical'purpose and similar conformation, but their actual size and their proportions will vary depending upon the height, the weight and other peculiarities in the stature of the intended wearer.

When commencing with the manufacture of a garment, therefore, it is first necessary to lay out the contours of these component parts according to the peculiar dimensions of the'custom'er; This is frequently done by drawing the contours of the component parts upona sheet of paper, whereupon the parts are cut from the paper to form stencils orpatterns that are placed upon the cloth and along which the component parts of the garment are cut from the cloth.

To simplify the cutting of these component parts of a garment, the height and width or circumference of the human figure has been classed into a plurality of standard types, and large tailoring establishments have made it a practice to keep, a collection of the required patterns for each standard size" and for each particular type of garment. However, it is not only the human form that varies, 'Eacl'iparticular type of garment, such as a coat o'ra pair-of trousers can be made in many different styles according to prevailing fashions and to the preference of" the customer, and each such different style is composed of parts that'have their own peculiar shape. It is evident, ftherefor'e, that preparedness for the prevalent typesof the human figure, and for all the popular types and styles of garments, requires a very large collection of patterns which only large establishments can possibly afford. v

Broadly, it is an object of my invention to provide an apparatus or machine by means of which the patterns of the component parts of any type and style of garment may readily be marked upon a piece of cloth, without need -to draw them specially for each new customer and also without need'to keep a large collection of patterns in store.

Another object of the invention is to provide an arrangement, of the type referred to, which employs a projector'by means of which all the component p'arts of a garment may be projected in live size upon apiece-of cloth fr'dm'a filmor slide that is scarcely larger than a sheet of paper.

Furthermore, it is an object of the present invention to provide a pattern projection arrangement, of the type referred to, whose operation may be adjusted to suit use a new slide or film.

another object of the invention is to provide an k, 2,973,688 Patented Mar. 7, 1961 arrangement, of the type referred to, which employs a projector of ordinary size, yet may be operated to mark the patterns of the component parts for the garments in their proper length upon the piece of cloth.

These and other objects of my invention will be apparent from the following description of the accompanying drawing which illustrates a preferred embodiment thereof and wherein:

Figure l is a schematic side elevation of a machine embodying my invention;

Figure 2 a front elevation of the machine;

Figure 3 is a split side elevation of the machine viewed from, and in the direction of, the arrows 33 of Figure 2.

Figure 4 is a split side elevation of a central longitudinal section through a part of the apparatus, taken along and viewed in the direction of, the arrows 44 in Figure 2;

Figure 5 is a cross section taken through the part illustrated in Figure 4 along line 5.5 of Figure 3 and viewed in the direction of the arrows associated with said line;

Figure 6 is a perspective of an adjustable power trans mission comprised in the machine of the invention;

Figure 7 is an enlarged fragmentary side elevation of a part of the machine viewed in the direction of the arrows 7-7 in Figure 2;

Figure 8 is a central sectionthrough the part illustrated in Figure 7 taken along line 8 8 of Figure 2 and viewed in the direction of the arrows associated with said line;

' Figure 9 is a cross section through the part illustratedin Figure 7 taken along line 9-9 of vFigure 8, and viewed in the direction of the arrows associated with said line;

Figure 10 is an enlarged side elevation of a section taken along line 1010 of Figure 2 illustrating details of'another power transmission comprised in the machine of the invention;

Figure 11 is a fragmentary plan view of the same power transmission;

Figure 12 is a fragmentary plan view of a film strip such as may be employed in the apparatus of the inven tion andup'on WhlCh are marked out the contour patterns of the component parts of a mans suit;

Figure 13 is a fragmentary plan view of a table that forms part of the apparatus of my invention, with a part the corresponding positions of the film band in the.pro-.

jector; and

Figure 15 is a view, similar to Figure 14, illustrating the performance of the machine in a difierent position of adjustment.

General organization of the machine Having first reference to Figure 1, the machine of my invention comprises an elongated stationary table plate 20 having a flat horizontally disposed top surface 22 upon which a piece of cloth may be spread as indicated u projector 28 which is so disposed that it directs its diverging beam of light 29 obliquely in an upward direction above the longitudinal center axis of the table against a tilted mirror 30 which is supported from a boom structure 32 that is secured to and rises obliquely from the upper end of the superstructure 27. The position of the mirror is such that it throws the beam of light vertically down upon the table 20, as indicated in Fig1 1re l.

Manually operable means in the form of a crank wheel 33 are provided to move the mirror 35%) to difierfint positions along the obliquely rising boom structure and thus vary its average height above the top surface of the table. This is effective to vary the diameter of the image field projected upon said surfaceand serves in accordance with my invention to adjust the width of pattern images projected upon the table so as to adapt them to the width or circumference of a particular customer.

A motor '34 is supported fromthe carriage25' (Figures 2 and and is arranged, upon energization, to move the carriage and hence the projector 25 through a suitable reduction transmission collectively identified by the reference numeral 35, at a relatively slow speed over the table 2% so that the image field produced by projector 28 and cast upon the table by the mirror 30- travels over the top surface of the table at a predetermined rate; and as the carriage travels over and along the table, it is effective to move a film band 36 (Figure 12) through the projector at a rate of speed that is greatly reduced as compared with the speed at which the carriage moves, but is carefully correlated to the speed of said carriage and may selectively be adjusted by means of a manually adjustable transmission collectively identified by the reference numeral 38 (Figures 1, 2, 3 and 6) When the film 36 passes through the projector at a certain standard speed which is preferably about one tenth of the speed at which the carriage advances across the stationary table 2%, the longitudinal dimension of the patterns traced upon the table by the projected images .as the carriage with the projector mounted thereon travels over said table, will "be of a standard length, but when the speed of the film is increased by proper adjustment of transmission 38, the time required for passing the total length of the film through the projector is shortened and the carriage will therefore have travelled a shorter distance over the table by the time the effective image-producing length of the film "has passed through the projector. This means that the longitudinal paths of all the contour patterns traced upon the table are shortened as compared with their normal length and hence will fit a person of shorter than normal height. Vice versa, when the speed of movement of the film through the projector 28 is slowed down by proper adjustment of the transmission 38, the film takes longer to travel through the projector, and by the time its effective image-producing length has passed fully through the projector, the carriage and hence the projector have travelled a greater distance above and along the table 20. As a result thereof, all the longitudinal paths traced by the travelling images upon the table, are correspondingly "longer and when the component parts or" a suit are cut from a piece of cloth placed upon the table as their images travel along and over the table, they will fit a taller than normal person.

The carriage moving mechanism Referring now to the mechanism for moving -the-carriage 25 across the table 20, the motor 34 is a reversible motor and has an output shaft 40 (Figure 1-0) which carries a small pulley 42 whose rotational speed is appropriately reduced by the hereinbefore mentioned transmission 35 which comprises a train of smaller and larger pulleys including the hereinbefore mentioned pulley 42 and the pulleys 44, 45, 46, 48, 50 and 52, with each larger pulley being driven from the preceding smaller pulley by anendless belt, and each smaller pulley being mounted upon the rotational shaft of the preceding large diameter pulley or the output shaft 40 of motor 34, -respectively, as best illustrated in Figures 10 and 11. The last of the pulleys in the described train, i.e. pulley 52 is operatively connected by an endless belt 54 to a wheel '55 of relatively large diameter that is firmly mounted upon a transverse shaft 56 which extends across the total width of carriage and table (Figure 3) and is rotatably supported from the opposite sides of the carriage. Near its ends the shaft d6 carries small pulleys 58a and 58b which are operatively connected by endless belts 60a and 60b respectively to large diameter pulleys 62a and 62b. puileys are firmly secured to short transverse shafts 54a and 6412 that are rotatably mounted upon side bars 63a and 63b which are rigidly supported from the base structure of carriage 25 at either side of table 20. Firmly mounted upon the shafts 64a and 64!) adjacent the pulleys 62a and 62b are flanged wheels 6511 and 65b, respectively, which run upon tubular tracks 66a and 661) that are secured to lateral flanges 68a and 6,811 which are formed at either side of the table plate 20. Whenever ,the motor 34 is set into opeartion, it turns the shafts 64a and 64b and hence the flanged wheels 6511 and 651) through the described train of pulleys and belts at a greatly reduced speed and in this manner moves the carriage over the table.

To avoid slippage of the flanged wheels upon the tracks 66a and 66b and to reduce the possibility of accidental uncontrolled movement of the carriage relatively to the table, pulleys 759a .and 7% are vfirmly mounted upon the shafts 64a and 64b above the lateral edge areas of the table plate 20, and another set of pulleys 72a and 72b (Figure 11) is firmly mounted upon transverse shafts 74a and 74b respectively, that are rotatably supported upon the side bars 63a and 63b a distance removed ,from the pulleys 70a and 76-!) respectively, in the direction of movement of the carriage relative to the table; and trained around the pulleys 70a and 72a and the pulleys 7 0 b and 72h are heavy endless rubber belts 75a and 75h, respectively, whose bottom runs are arrangedto engage the lateral edge areas of the table surface, as best shown 'in Figures 2 and 10. Mounted upon the transverse shafts 74a and 74b is another set of flanged wheels 76a and 76h respectively, that engage the tubular tracks 66a and 66/) (Figures 3 and 11).

When the motor 34 is at rest, the frictional engagement of the bottom runs of the rubber belts 75a and75b with the top surface of the table will prevent accidental ,movement of the carriage relative to the table, and when the motor is set into motion, engagement of the power driven belts with the top surface of the table will aceurately control the movement of the carriage and prevent any inconsistencies or irregularities in the advance thereof, such as might be caused by slippage of the flanged wheels on the tracks or a free wheeling advance of the carriage under the momentum of any movement previously parted thereto.

The power train to the film advancing mechanism Whenever operation of motor 34 moves the carriage over and along the table 20, the relative movement between ,table and carn'age is arranged to effect movement of the film band '36 through the projector 28 at aspeed that is very precisely related to the speed of advance of the carriage over the table. For this purpose a rack bar 78 is mounted upon the flange 68b of table 26 adjacent the track 66b as shown in Figures 1, '2 and 3, and said rack-bar is enmeshed with a gear or pinion 80 that is rotatably supported from the base structure 26 of carriage 25, so that it will turn whenever the carriage moves over and along the table 20. The rotary 11novc ment of the gear 80 is transmitted through a plurality of enmeshed superposed gears 82, v84 and 85 (Figure 3) each rotatably supported from the base structure of the carriage 25, to a fifth gear 86 (Figures'jZ' and 6') which is mounted upon a short transverse 'sha'f t' 88 that [is rotatably supported in, and projects inwardly from, one

'side member 90b of atransmission housing which ie mounted upon the base structure 26 of the carriage. The gear 86 forms part of the hereinbefore mentioned adjustable transmission 38 (Figure 6) and meshes with another gear 94 which is firmly mounted upon another transverse shaft 95 that is rotatably supported in the side member 90b of housing 92 above shaft 88. Likewise mounted upon the upper shaft 95 is another gear 96 which may be engaged by yet another gear 98 that is rotatably supported in the forked end 100 of a lever arm 102 in the form of an inverted L (Figures 1 and 3). Said arm swivels upon yet another transverse shaft 104 (Figure 6) that is rotatably mounted in the housing 92 and which extends across the total transverse width of said housing from the side member 9012 to the opposite side member 90a thereof. Keyed to said shaft 104 at a point intermediately of the prongs of forked arm 102 is another gear 105 which is permanently enmeshed with the gear 98. Thus, whenever the arm 102 upon shaft '4is swung into the position shown in Figures 1 and 3, its gear 98 is engaged with gear 96 on shaft 95, and as a result thereof rotary power will be transmitted from the pinion 80 through gears 82, 84, 85, 86, 94, shaft 95 and gears 96, 98 and 105 to the shaft 104, and said shaft will turn whenever the carriage 25 is in motion relative to the table 20.

Keyed to the shaft 104 is another gear 106 in such a manner it may slide axially along said shaft while forced to participate in the rotation thereof, and said gear 106 is straddled by the prongs of another forked lever arm 108 of L-shaped conformation (Figures 2 and 6) that is swivelled upon the shaft 104 in such a manner that it may slide axially along said shaft in unison with the gear 106. Said forked lever arm 108 carries between itsprongsabove and in mesh with the gear 106'another rotatable gear 110; Rotatably supported in the side mem-' ber 90a of housing 92 is yet another shaft 112, and firmly mounted upon said shaft 112 are eight juxtaposed gears 114, 115, 116, 117, 118, 119, 120 and 121 of successively larger diameters. The rightmost one of said gears, as viewed in Figures 2 and 6, is permanently enmeshed with another gear 122 which is firmly mounted upon a transverse shaft 124 (Figure 2) that is rotatably mounted in the side member 90a of housing 92 and which is the output shaft of the adjustable transmission 38. By swinging the arm 108 backwardly into the position illustrated in full lines in Figure 6, wherein its gear 110 is-disengaged upon any one-of the gears upon shaft 112, shifting it axially upon shaft 104 into a position opposite a selected one of the consecutively larger gears 114 to'121, and swinging it forwardly into the position illustrated in phantom lines in Figure 6, wherein its gear 110 is enmeshed with the selected gear, the described transmission may be set to drive theoutput shaft 124 at any one of eight different speeds. When the gear 110 in forked arm 108 engages the smallest gear 114 on shaft 112, the output shaft will move at its highest speed corresponding to the shortest longitudinal dimension of the patterns projected upon table 20, and when the gear 110 engages the largest gear 121 on shaft 112, the output shaft 124 will turn at the lowest speed which establishes the longest longitudinal dimension of the patterns projected upon the table during practical performance of the device. To hold the arm 108 with its gear 110 dependably in any one of its selected positions of adjustment, the top 125 of the housing 92 may be provided with a hole 126 above each of the consecutively larger transmission gears 114 to 121, and

the arm 108 may be swung over any one of the holes 126 and retained in place bya spring loaded setting pin 128 that extends through the bent upper end of said arm.

if the mechanism is adjusted by the setting of arm 108,

maybe marked upon the top surface of the housing 92, adjacent each hole 126. Thus, the inscription 4 ft. 11 may be provided adjacent the hole above the smallest gear 114 and the adjoining holes may consecutively be provided with the inscription 5 ft. 3, 5 ft. 7, 5 ft. 11, 6 ft. 3, 6 ft. 7, and 6 ft. 11 and 7 ft. 3, which covers practically the total range in the height of the human figure.

Mechanism for moving the film through the projector To move the film 36 upon which images of the cont-our patterns are marked, through the projector in predetermined relation to movement of the carriage 25 across the table 20, and in such a manner that no slippage can occur between the film and the means for impelling it through the projector, said film is wound with its opposite ends upon a pair of reels 126 and 128, respectively, that are rotatably secured to the frame of the superstructure of carriage 25 above and below the lens portion 28a of the projector 28, as shown in Figure 8. The connecting run of the film between said reels is passed through the slot of the guide frame 129 of the projector by, and between, the adjacent parallel runs of two pairs of endless belts 130a, 130b and 132a, 13217 (Figure 9) that are driven at the appropriate speed in opposite direction from the hereinbefore mentioned output shaft 124 of the adjustable transmission 38 and pass through the slot of the guide frame of projector 28 at either side of the lens aperture thereof. Having reference to Figures 8 and 9, the two belts 130a and 13% are trained over transverse shafts 134 and 135 that are disposed above and below the guide frame 129 of the projector and which are rotatably sup-. ported in the frame of the superstructure 26, and the re turn runs of said belts are guided exteriorly past the lens portion 28a of the projector by transverse guide rollers 136- and 138 that are mounted in the carirage frame (Figure 8). To drive said beltsin the required manner andat the required speed in relation to the advance of the carriage 25 relative to the table 20, the hereinbeforev mentioned output shaft 124 of transmission 38 is connected by a universal joint 140 to another transverse shaft 142 that is rotatably supported in the superstructure of the carriage near the bottom thereof and which carries a gear 144 (Figures 2, 7 and 9) of relatively small diameter. .Said. gear 144 is enmeshed with a gear 145 of larger diameter that is firmly mounted upon the hereinbefore mentioned transverse shaft 135 adjacent the bot tom of the guide frame 129; and an idler gear 146 en-. meshed with the gear 145 'is enmeshed with and drives another gear 148 that is of equal size as gear 145 and which turns with the same speed and in the same direction as said gear 145. The gear 148 is firmly mounted upon the transverse shaft 134 adjacent the upper end of the guide frame 129 and as a result thereof the shafts 134 and 135 will'move the belts 130a and 1301) in unison through the slot of the guide frame 129. E

The opposite belt pair 132a and 13211 is trained around an upper shaft 150 that is rotatably mounted in the carriage frame above the shaft 134, (Figures 8 and 9) and a lower shaft 152 that is rotatably mounted in the carriage frame below the shaft 135; and the front runs of said belts 132a and 1321) are guided around their upper shaft 150 into contact with the rectilinear runs of the belts 130a and 1301); and near the lower end of the rectilinear runs of said belts 130a and 130b, the belts 132a and 13211 are guided away from said belts 130a and 13% and around "the lower shaft 152 from where their return runs are guided back to the upper shaft 150 by means of suitably positioned transverse' guide rollers 154 and 155 (Figures 8' and 9). To drive the belts 132a and 13212 in unison with, but in the opposite direction to, the belts 130a and 130b, the upper and lower drive shafts 134 and 135 of the belts 130a and 13012 are each provided with pinions 156 and 158, respectively, that mesh with pinions 160 and 162 which are firmly mounted upon.

7 the upper and lower drive shafts '1'50'and 152, -respectively, of the belts 132a and -132b. Thus, whenever the carriage is set into motion, and the adjustable transmission 3B-is engaged, the belts a, 130k and 132a, 1321), will move in unison at a predetermined rate and pull the film whose edges are gripped between their rectilinear runs, from one of the reels 126 or 128, as the case may be, depending upon the direction of movement of the r g .25 overt bl .20, and .pa it th ugh the guide frame of the projector. To facilitate unwinding of the film from whatever reel may .act as the supply reel at the moment and to assure that the passed portion of the film is properly WOllIld'UPO-Xljthfi other reel, 1 provide pulleys 164 of equal diameter upon -;the drive shafts 1 34 and and upon the shafts of "the reels 1,26 and 128, and I train an endless coil spring belt around said :pulleys so that the reels 126 and 128 will always turn in the proper direction and atthe proper speed to serve as supply and take ;up reels, as the case may be, when the drive shafts 134 and 135 are inmotion to move the film through the projector 23. A crank handle 166 may be provided upon the-upper drive shaft 134 (Figure 7) so that the position of the film in the projector may be properly adjusted whenever necessary, provided the transmission 38 is in disengaged position.

The adjustable mirror The boom structure 32 that supports the mirror 30 which reflects the light beam of the projector onto :the table surface 20, comprises a :pair of U-shaped channels 168a and 16% that confront each other with their open sides, and which are rigidly secured to the carriage 25 and rise obliquely from the upper end of its superstructore 26 above the longitudinal center axis of table 29 in :tuplane parallel to the center axis of the beam of light emitted by the projector '28. Slidably supported upon and between the bottom flanges 170a and 17Gb of said channels (Figure 5) is a shelf 172 to whose lower end is hingedly connected the upper edge of the mirror '30 as shown at 174-. Said mirror may be secured to said shelf in any positionof angular adjustment by arod 175 that is hinged to the lower edge of the mirror and which may be secured in difierent positions of vertical adjustment to the slidingshelf 172 near the upper edge thereof by means of nuts $176. To shift the shelf with the mirror 30 supported therefrom along the bottom flanges of the channels 168a and 168b, the shelf 172 is secured to, and forms part of two endless belts 177a and 177b whose lower runs extend in and along the channels 168:: and 1681) and whose upper runs extend in an upper pair of transversely spaced channel bars 178a and 1781) that are rigidly secured to the carriage frame above channels 168a and 168?), respectively, as illustrated in Figures 1. 3 and 4. Adjacent the superstructure 26 of carriage '25 the belts 177a and 177 b are trained around a pair of flanged Wheels 18% and 189b, respectively, which are mounted upon a transverse shaft 182. Said shaft is rotatably supported in a pair of bars 134a and 18% (Figures 4 and 5) which are connected between the upper channels 178a and 3178b and the lower channels 168a and 168b, respectively. Near the convergingupper ends of said channels the belts 177a and 17712 are trained over rollers (Figure 4) pivoted to a central block 186 that slides in the space between the shanks 188a and 18% of a U-shaped bracket 188, which is secured to the converging upper ends of the channels 168a and 16812, and 1780, 1787). By turning a threaded stem 190 that is anchored in the block 136 and which fiXtends through a threaded aperture in the bight portion 188;: of the U-shaped bracket 188, the block 186 with the rollers 185 secured thereto may be pulled farther away from the flanged wheels 180a and 1801) at the opposite end of the boo-m so as to tighten the belts 177a and 177 b and in this manner maintain them in effective condition. ecur d to he tr n ver e shaf 1 2 a he l wer nd of the boom structure at a point laterally thereof is the i the table as indicated at X (Figure 1).

ace-sees hereinbefore mentioned crank wheel 33 (Figures 3, 4 and 5) which is provided with a handle 194. By turning said wheel the belts 177a and 177b may be rotated to shift the mirror supporting shelf 172 along and within the channels 168a and 16812 from lower to higher levels, and vice versa. "The oblique position of the mirror is such that the center axis of the beam of light projected upon it, is directed vertically against the top surface of For this purpose -the plane of the mirror surface must be normal to a line that bisects the angle formed by and between the center axis X of'the light beam and a vertical plane, so that the angle of incidence 0c of the center axis of the light beam relative to the plane of the mirror, and the angle of reflection )3 of said center axis are identical, as shown in Figure 1 When this is the case, an image projected upon the surface of the table 20 by the mirror 30 is a substantially uniform enlargement of the image on the film in the projector and, in particular, will be of increasing transverse width when the mirror is adjusted to a position higher on the boom structure by appropriate rotation of the crank wheel 192, and of decreasing transverse -width when said mirror is lowered along said boom structure by rotating said wheel 192 in the opposite direction as illustrated at PF and PF respectively, in Figure 13.

For the purpose of facilitating adjustment of the mirror 30 on the boom structure 32 so as to set the image projected upon the table -plate22 to the width or circumference of a particular customer, the end of the shaft 182 opposite to crank wheel 33, may be provided with a pulley 195 that is connected by an endless belt 196 with another-pulley 198 which is mounted upon a transverse shaft 2% (Figure 5). Shaft 260 extends below the crank shaft 182 and is rotatably supported from the lower channels 168a and 1168b of the boom structure in ventical alignment with said crank shaft 182; and secured to the opposite end of said shaft 200 is a calibrated dial 202 that exposes any one of a sequence of equispaced inscriptions, such as 36, '33, 40, 42, 44, etc. through a stationary window frame 204 (Figures 1 and 3), whenever the mirror has been set to a position wherein the width of the image projected upon the table corresponds to the standardwidth identified by the calibration appearing in said window frame'204.

Operation When using the machine of the invention in practice as an aid in cutting the component parts of a garment from a piece of cloth, the tailor spreads the piece of clothupon the table and turns on the light 205 in projector 28.

The component parts of a suit or similar garment are marked out-on the film band 36 on a reduced scale, and they are preferably so arranged relative to each other as to be spread over a minimum area, such as illustrated at 296 in Figure 12, so that there will be a minimum waste of material when the components are cut from the cloth. In practice the band of film wound upon the reels 126 and 128 (Figure 8) and passed through the guide frame 129 of the projector, does not just display a single set of contour patterns for a particular style of suit, such as the set 206 illustrates in Figure 12, it displays a sequence of several such sets; and as one of the first steps in readying the machine of the invention for practical operation, the tailor turns the hand crank 166 (Figure 7) of the film transporting mechanismhaving previously disengaged the transmission 38until the leading edge 208 (Figures 12 and 13) of the set of 20 as soon as the light in the projector is turned on, and by operating the crank 166 until the leading edge of the image of the selected set of contour patterns aligns itself with the image 210' of the diagonal wire 210 that is always visible in the image field and which remains in a fixed position relative to said field irrespective of the momentary position of said field upon the table. As the next step the tailor adjusts the position of the mirror 30 upon boom structure 32 by manipulation of the crank wheel 33 (Figures 1, 3 and 5) to decrease or increase the size of the images projected upon the cloth on table 20 according to the width or circumference of the particular customer for whom the suit is to be cut. If he raises the mirror, the image field projected upon the cloth including the pattern images appearing in said field, will become wider as indicated at PF in Figure 13, and if he lowers the mirror, the image field and the images appearing therein will become narrower as indicated at PF In actual practice the tailor will merely turn the crank wheel 33 until the numeral displayed through the window frame 204 of dial 202 indicates the size group into which he has classified his customer on the basis of his actual measurements.

With the transmission 38 still disengaged, the tailor will now set the motor 34 into operation to move the carriage 25, without changing the position of the film relative to the projector, into a position wherein the image 210 of the thread or wire 210, and hence the image of the leading edge of the selected set of patterns, lies closely adjacent to the remote edge of the piece of cloth upon table 20, whereat the cut-ting operation is to commence. This position is illustrated in Figure 13. It should be noted, however, that in Figure 13 and also in the subsequent operational Figures 14 and 15, the film band is represented as exhibiting only a single component of exaggerated size relative to the size of the film band, namely a component of a trouser leg, to make it easier to understand the manner in which the machine of the invention performs and to simplify the illustration of the consecutive stages in the performance of the machine. It will be understood that in reality the film band will usually display a whole collection of properly arranged components, such as illustrated in Figure 12.

As the final preparatory step, the tailor connects the adjustable transmission 38 by engaging the gear 110 in its axially slidable lever arm 108 with the correct one of the juxtaposed differently sized gears 114 to 121 upon shaft 112. For instance, if the height of his customer is about 5 ft. 3, he will engage the gear 110 with the gear 116, which is elfective upon relative movement of carriage and table to move the film 36 through the projector at a faster than average rate. This shortens the length of the paths traced by the images that are projected upon the piece of cloth on table 20, as the carriage recedes from its initially adjusted position in a direction away from the remote edge of the piece of cloth on said table. As the carriage moves across the table, it moves the projected image field PF at all times with uniform speed across the piece of cloth as indicated by the equispaced sequences of rectangular blocks PF to PF both in Figures 14 and 15. At the same time, however, the film band 36 is passed with a predetermined speed through the guide frame 219 of the projector, and 'as a result thereof the images of the component parts marked upon the film travel across the illuminated image or projection field in a direction opposite to movement of said field across the cloth. But while the speed of advance of the projection field across the table is uniform and is always the same, the speed of the film 36 through the projector 21, and hence the speed of travel of the projected images relative to the projection field is either faster or slower depending upon adjustment of transmission 38. Thus, when the film moves faster than a selected standard, the set of patterns marked on the film will have passed through the projector and their images will have moved fully across the image field projected upon the clothbefore said field has travelled very far, so that the longitudinal path traced by said images upon the piece of cloth is relatively short; and vice versa, when the movement of the film band 36 through the projector is slowed down, as it may be by appropriate adjustment of the transmission 38, the image or projection field PF will have travelled a longer distance across the table by the time the set of imagescorresponding to the contour patterns on the film has passed fully through the frame 219 of projector 28; and as a result thereof the longitudinal dimension of the images traced upon the piece of cloth will be correspondingly longer.

Figure 14 illustrates five consecutive positions of the image or projection field PF, consecutively identified by the numbers 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5, upon a piece of cloth 24 supported upon table 20 as the carriage 25 moves the projector across the table. The frames 129 at the side of the table represent the guide frame of the projector and show the position of a film band 36 which advances through said frame and which has marked thereon the contour pattern of the component part of a pair of trousers. Figure 14 indicates that the total image of the component has passed through the frame by the time the image field PF reaches the stage marked PF Hence, the image traced upon the piece of cloth and cut out by the tailor as the projection field travelled along the piece of cloth is relatively short, and fits for example a man who is only 5 ft. 3 in height. In Figure 15, however, the portion of the film band bearing the same contour did not pass through the frame 129 until the carriage had placed the image field at the point marked PF which is due to the fact that the speed of the film transporting system of the machine had been slowed down by adjustment of transmission 38. As a result, the image traced upon the piece of cloth by movement of the carriage across the table and the counter-movement of the film through the projection frame 129, is'materially longer than in the case illustrated in Figure 14. Thus, by appropriate adjustment of transmission 38 the length of the images traced upon the piece of cloth on the machine of my invention, may be adjusted to suit customers of widely varying height without need to employ different sets of patterns.

It remains to point out that in cutting the component parts of the garment from the piece of cloth along the contours of the projected images as the projection field PF moves across the table, and as said images in turn pass through the projection field in the opposite direction, it is advisable for the operator to cut into the cloth ad'- jacent the image 210' of the transverse threador wire 210 as said image travels across the table 20 in unison with the projection field. It will, of course, be necessary to arrest the movement of the image or projection field over the cloth, when transverse or. diagonal cuts have to be made, and for this reason operation of the motor may be controlled from a switch 212 at the end of an elongated cable 214 that reaches from the motor 34 to a point on the table below the mirror 30 so that the motor control switch will always be within easy reach of the operator. It will also be understood that for making the various longitudinal cuts which are necessary to cut components corresponding to the contours illustrated in Figure 12 from the cloth, it will be necessary to back up the carriage 25, by appropriate manipulation of the switch 212 and allow it to cover repeatedly areas that may have been covered before.

While I have explained my invention with the aid of a particular embodiment thereof, it will be understood that the invention is not limited to the specific constructional details shown and described by way of example which may be departed from without departing from the scope and spirit of the invention.

I claim:

1. Arrangement for projecting images in selectable different proportions upon a piece of cloth comprising a ao'raass 11 7 table having a fiat top surface upon which a piece of cloth may be spread, rails at eitherside of said table, a wheeled carriage placed upon said rails for movement thereon over and along said table, a projector mounted upon said carriage and having a mechanism for passing a film band through said projector, a mirror for directing the beam of light emitted by said projector onto said table to produce a light field thereon, and means efiective in response to movement of said carriage over and along said table for actuating said mechanism to move a film hand through said projector at a selected speed in relation to the speed of movement of said carriage including a rack bar mounted upon said table parallel to said rails, a gear rotatably Supported from said carriage in mesh with said rack bar ,and an adjustable transmission interposed between said gear and said mechanism.

2. An arrangement for projecting an image in diiferent proportions upon a piece .of cloth comprising a table having a flat top surface upon which a piece of cloth may be spread; rails at either side of said table; a carriage having wheels placed upon said rails; means operable to move said carrige along said rails including a source of rotary power supported from said carriage, an endless belt of a flexible material rotatably supported from said carriage and having a rectilinear bottom run extending parallel to said rails and in contact with the top surface of said table, and means applying the rotary power of said source of rotary power to said wheels and said belt; a projector mounted upon said carriage and having a mechanism for passing a film band through said projector; a mirror, means for supporting said mirror from said carriage in a position effective to direct the beam of light emitted by said projector onto the top surface of said table to produce a light field thereon; a manually adjustable transmission supported from said carriage in engagement with said film band passing mechanism, and means actuated by movement of said carriage on said rails for operating said transmission to actuate said mechanism and thus pass a film band through said projector at a selected speed in relation to the speed of movement of said carriage.

3. An arrangement for projecting an image in different proportions upon a piece of cloth comprising a table having a flat top surface upon which a piece of cloth may be spread; rails at either side of said table; a carriage having wheels placed upon said rails; means operable to move said carriage upon said rails including a source of rotary power supported from said carriage and means for applying said rotary power to said Wheels at a reduced rate of speed; means efiective to prevent slippage of said Wheels upon said rails and control the advance of the carriage relative to said table including an endless belt of a flexible material rotatably supported from said carriage and having a rectilinear bottom run extending parallel to said rails and in contact with the top surface of said table, and means turning said endless belt in synchronism with said wheels; a projector mounted upon said carriage, a mirror supported from said carriage in a position to direct the beam of light emitted by said projector onto the top surface of said table to produce a light field thereon; and means efi'ective when said carriage is in motion upon said rails to move a film band through said projector at a selected speed in relation to the speed of movement of said carriage, including a mechanism for passing a film hand through said projector, a rack bar mounted upon said table parallel to said mile, a gear rotatably supported from said carriage in mesh with said rack bar and a manually adjustable transmission interposed between said gear and said mechanism.

4. Arrangement for projecting the image of a pattern at a selected length upon a piece .of cloth comprising a table having a fiat surface upon which apiece of cloth may be spread, a carriage arranged to move across said 12 table, a projector mounted upon said carriage for movement therewith and including a mechanism for moving a film band having patterns marked thereon through said projector, a mirror supported in front of said projector for reflecting the beam of light emitted from said projector upon said table to produce a light field thereon, means operable to efiect movement of said carriage across said table to move the light field produced by said projector across said table, and manually adjustable transmission means supported from said carriage and actuated by movement of said carriage across said table for actuating said mechanism to pass a film band through said projector at a selected speed in relation to the speed of movement of said carriage across said table so as to move the image of any pattern on said film at a selected speed through the light field projected upon the table as movement of said carriage causes said light field to travel across said table.

5. Arrangement for projecting the image of a pattern at a selected width and length out of a range of selectable widths and lengths upon a piece of cloth comprising a table having a fiat top surface upon which a piece of cloth may be spread, a carriage arranged for movement across said table, a projector mounted upon said carriage for movement therewith and including a mechanism for passing a film band having patterns marked thereon through said projector, a mirror, means for supporting said mirror from said carriage in front of said projector and above said table todeflect the light beam emitted by said projector onto the surface of said table and thus create a light field thereon, manually operable means for adjusting the height of said mirror above said table to vary the size of the light field projected upon said table so as to djust the width of any pattern image exhibited therein, means operable to effect movement of said carriage across said table, and manually adjustable transmission means supported from said carriage and actuated by movement of said carriage across said table for actuating said mechanism to pass a film band through said projector at a selected speed relative to the speed of movement of said carriage across said table so as to move the image of any pattern on said film band at a selected speed through the light field onto said table as said moving carriage causes said field of light to travel across said table.

6. Arrangement for projecting the image of a pattern at a selected width and length out of a range of selectable widths and lengths upon a piece of cloth comprising a table having a flat top surface upon which a piece of cloth may be spread, a carriage arranged for movement across said table, a projector mounted upon said carriage for movement therewith and in such a position that its light earn slants upwardly above the path of movement of said carriage, and including a mechanism for passing a film band having patterns marked thereon through said projector, a mirror, means for supporting said mirror from said carriage in front of said projector for movement along a line parallel with the center axis of said light beam and inclined relative to the center axis of said light beam to deflect said light beam onto the surface of said table and thus create a light field thereon, manually operable means for adjusting the position of said mirror along its line of movement to varyits height above said table and in this manner vary the size of the light field projected upon said table to adjust the width of any pattern image exhibited therein, means operable to effect movement of said carriage across said table, manually adjustable transmission means supported from said carriage in engagement with said film band passing mechanism, means actuated by movement of said carriage across said table for operating said transmission to actuate said mechanism and pass a film band through said projector at a selected speed relative to the speed of movement of said carriage across said table whereby the image of any patternon said film band .rnoves ata selected speed through the light field projected onto said table as said moving carriage causes said field of light to travel across said table.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 14 Ball Nov. 3, 1936 Hoorn July 13, 1937 Karnborian Nov. 18, 1941 Tracy Feb. 27, 1951 Baston Sept. 27, 1955 Gerard Mar. 19, 1957 FOREIGN PATENTS Germany Dec. 22, 1941

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3240114 *Nov 17, 1961Mar 15, 1966Jonker Business Machines IncInformation storage and retrieval copy apparatus
US3311980 *Dec 9, 1963Apr 4, 1967Williams Harold AGrading device and method of grading and marking
US3540830 *Jul 3, 1967Nov 17, 1970Cutting Room Appliances CorpMeans and method for detecting the effective position of flaws in cloth webs on cloth laying tables
US4124285 *May 23, 1977Nov 7, 1978Levi Strauss & Co.Marker projector system
US4605150 *Dec 26, 1984Aug 12, 1986Nippon Notion Kogyo Co., Ltd.Button setting apparatus with optical position indicator
US4910541 *Nov 30, 1988Mar 20, 1990Thomas MorganLight square projector for use in pasting adhesively-waxed printed pieces upon a layout sheet
US6654046Jan 31, 2001Nov 25, 2003Julian A. EccleshallMethod and apparatus for recording a three dimensional figure on a two dimensional surface allowing clothing patterns to be produced
DE10195135B4 *Jan 31, 2001Jan 14, 2010Julian EccleshallVorrichtung und Verfahren zur Aufnahme einer dreidimensionalen Figur auf einer zweidimensionalen Oberfläche, die die Herstellung von Kleidungsschnittmustern ermöglichen
WO1996026838A1 *Mar 1, 1996Sep 6, 1996Fabio BonventoMethod and device for centring images on fabric, clothes or other materials
Classifications
U.S. Classification353/50, 352/47, 33/2.00R, 33/11, 353/62
International ClassificationG03B21/00, A41H3/00
Cooperative ClassificationA41H3/00, G03B21/00
European ClassificationG03B21/00, A41H3/00