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Publication numberUS2973865 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 7, 1961
Filing dateSep 17, 1957
Priority dateSep 17, 1957
Publication numberUS 2973865 A, US 2973865A, US-A-2973865, US2973865 A, US2973865A
InventorsCibula John F
Original AssigneeCibula John F
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Rocker screen vibrating machine with undulated screen cloth
US 2973865 A
Abstract  available in
Images(4)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

March 7, 1961 J. F. CIBULA 2,973,865

ROCKERSCREEN VIBRATING MACHINE WITH UNDULATED SCREEN CLOTH Filed Sept. 17, 1957 4 Sheets-Sheet 1 INVENTOR Job n F Gin/1%,

March 7, 1961 clBULA 2,973,865

ROCKER SCREEN VIBRATING MACHINE WITH UNDULATED SCREEN CLOTH Filed Sept. 1'7, 1957 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 J. F. CIBULA March 7, 1961 ROCKER SCREEN VIBRATING MACHINE WITH UNDULATED SCREEN CLOTH Filed Sept. 17, 1957 4 Sheets-Sheet 35 R m m 0 m 0 w C F v H RN M mm J .h w. mm

ATTORNEY J. F. CIBULA 2,973,865'

ROCKER SCREEN VIBRATING MACHINE WITH UNDULATED SCREEN CLOTH March 7, 1961 4 SheetsSheet 4 Filed Sept. 17, 1957 John FC/bu/a,

BY W M ATTORNEY United States Patent ROCKER SCREEN VIBRATING MACHINE WITH UNDULATED SCREEN CLOTH John F. Cibula, 609 W. Lemon St., Lancaster, Pa.

Filed Sept. 17, 19 57 Ser. No. 684,521 Claims. (Cl. 209-315) construction of undulated screen. employing an undulated screen cloth arranged for directing the flow of material requiring classification in a manner for obtaining efiicient separation of the material and also the dewatering or repulping'of the materials requiring washing.

Another object of my invention is to provide .an im proved construction of screen having a longitudinal section that is approximately sinusoidal in contour in combination with means for mounting and tensioning the screen.

Still another object of my invention is to provide a' vibrating and separating machine assembly which is dynamically balanced for minimizing the applied power necessary to. impart vibratory movement to the screen of the assembly.

A further object of my invention is to provide a construction of vibrating mechanism for a separating and classifying machine in which a spring suspended screen assembly is subjected to a repeating vibratory cycle in a multiplicity of directions for effecting, a thorough screening and classification of materials deposited upon the screen assembly.

A still further object of my invention is to provide 'a multiple screen assembly for vibrating and separating machines where the vibratory mechanism is located within ously subjecting the screens to vibratory movement for efiecting a thorough screening and classification operation upon materials passing through the screens.

Other and further objects of my invention reside in a multiple deck screen assembly for vibrating and separating machines as set forth more fully in the specification hereinafter following by reference to the accompanying drawings in which:

Fig. 1 is a side elevational view of the screen assembly .and vibrating unit of my invention;

Fig. 2 is an end view of the machine shown in Fig. 1, the view showing the discharge end of the machine;

Fig. 3 is a longitudinal section taken through the screening deck of the vibrating unit assembly showing on an enlarged scale the undulated screen cloth used in the gthe space between superimposed screens forsir'nultane- 2,973,865 Fatented Mar. 7, 1961 2 Fig; 1, showing particularly the compression spring assembly; and g Fig. 8 is a fragmentary longitudinal sectional view on line 88 of Fig. 5. 7

My invention is directed to an improved construction of dynamically balanced vibratory separating and classifying machine in which there are at least two superimposed vibratory screens each having an approximately sinusoidal contour throughout the longitudinal section thereof. The sinusoidal screens are mounted in a vibratory frame having a rocker and vibratory assembly located between the superimposed screens. The shaped contour of each of the screens produces a riffie-fiow of the material deposited on the upper screen and sifted to the lower screen. The screens are formed in the undulated shape from cloth or wire mesh which efficiently screens or separates, dewaters or repulps various sizes of materials such as crushed stone, coal, sand, and other materials requiring processing. The frame of the machine of my invention pivots upon rocker stub shafts located on the center of gravity of theframe, thereby providing symmetrical balance on each side of the stub shaft. The dynamic balancing of the machine results in conservation of power required to drive the machine. The operating mechanism at the rear of the machine is compact and is formed from a minimum number of parts with low inherent manufacturing costs and requiring minimum maintenance and repair.

The riflie-flow multiple deck construction of the vibratory unit insures the efficient separation of various sizes of material by retarding the flow of the fines in the lowermost portions of the undulated surfaces of the screens while permitting larger sizes of materials to pass over the screens. Thus the vibrating action tends to force the fines through the screen openings thereby separating them from the larger sizes which remain on the screen cloth and are discharged at the end of the machine. My invention involves a novel method of clamping the screen cloth to the upper and lower decks of the vibratory unit.

The double deck assembly is rockably suspended at its center on the stationary frame of the machine and is floatably mounted on front and rear compressionsprings at each end thereof. A motor is supported in fixed relation to the stationary frame of the machine and drives a shaft journalled on the machine frame. The shaft on the machine frame drives an eccentric system connecting the vibratory frame of the machine for imparting cyclic vibratory movement to the double deck assembly inpat least two directions, thus subjecting the two decks of undulatory screens to vibratory action for thoroughly and efliciently screening and separating the materials deposited on the screens, the fines passing through the screens and oversize material passing over the screens and being discharged from the discharge ends thereof.

Referring to the drawings in detail, reference character 1 designates the stationary frame of the machine. This frame 1 may be mounted on a supporting structure In from below or suspended from an overhead structure by means of cables. Where the frame 1 is mounted from below on supporting structure In, the fines may be readily collected in a hopper beneath the stationary frame 1 and the driving motor unit 2 may be readily supported from the support-structure 1a on a suitable extension bracket 1b, as shown. The driving motor 2 which is fixed with respect to stationary frame 1, drive sheave 3 carried by the eccentric shaft 4, journalled at the rear of the machine as shown more clearly in Figs. 5 and 8. Power is transmitted to drive sheave 3 from motor 2, by suitable means such as the V-belt shown. The movement imparted to sheave 3 revolves the eccentric shaft 4, mounted upon the pillow block bearings 5 supported on stationary frame 1. The eccentric shaft 4 carries flywheel 6 on the end thereof for insuring smooth operation and avoiding unbalanced rotation of eccentric shaft 4. The eccentric shaft 4 transmits movement to eccentric bearing 7, which in turn transmits the motion to the eccentric rod 8, which coacts with the cam shaft 9, journalled in bracket 10, extending from the rear of the frame 11 of the vibrating unit. The vibrating unit 11, is a substantially rectangular frame formed by interconnected side plates 25, which are substantially of rhombic shape in side elevation as shown in Fig. l. The vibrating unit has an inclined end wall 11a at its rear extremity for facilitating the guiding of material deposited onto the vibrating unit. The vibrating unit 11 is dynamically balanced in position with respect to the stationary frame 1 on transversely aligned stub shafts 12 supported on stationary frame 1. The stub shafts 12 are fastened to the side plates 25 of the vibrating unit 11 and project into the bearings 34 which are carried by bearing supports 33 mounted on stationary frame 1. The bearings 34 are secured in position with respect to bearing supports 33 by means of clamping bolts 35. The stub shafts 12 which project from opposite sides of the vibratory unit are fastened in side plates 25 as shown more clearly in Fig. 6 by means of the cap 37 which fits over the inner end of stub shaft 12 and is secured to the inside of side plate 25 by means of clamping bolts 38 which pass through the annular flange of cap 37 and through the exterior annular flange 39 that is fastened to stub shaft 12 by means of set screws 40. Since the center line of the stub shafts 12 is the center line of the axis of motion 15 and is also on the center line of the center of gravity 16 of the vibrating unit 11, the vibrating unit 11 is normally in perfect dynamic balance. The vibrating unit 11 pivots or rocks back and forth on the stub shafts 12 as power is forced against bracket through the eccentric system 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, and 9, operating through bracket 10.

The vibrating unit 11 is initially set in its dynamically balanced normal position by floatingly suspending vibrating unit 11 on front and rear sets of compression springs shown at 13 and 14. The springs 13 and 14 support the vibrating unit 11 with respect to the stationary frame 1. These springs 13 and 14 have sufiicientresilience so that they may be displaced from side to side as well as axially and serve to cushion the vibrating unit 11 and to return the vibrating unit to its initial position as it is cyclically displaced under control of the eccentric system 4, 5, 6, 7, 8 and 9. That is to say, as coil springs 13 are compressed coil springs 14 expand and vice versa in accordance with the displacement of the vibrating unit 11 and each increment of compressive force is accompanied by an opposite increment of a restoring force tending to maintain the vibrating unit 11 in dynamic balance. The stationary frame 1 is provided with upwardlyextending spring guides 41 over which the open ends of the compression springs 13 and 14 fit. The upper ends of these springs fit into upper spring guides 43 which depend from the bearing supports indicated at 44 and 44a. These bearing supports provide mounting ends for compression lugs 45 and 451: which extend into bushed bearings 46a screwed through the flange support and attached to the side plates 25 of the vibratory unit and secured in position by lock nuts indicated in Fig. 7 at 48'. Both sides of the vibratory unit are symmetrical and similar reference characters have been used to indicate similar parts throughout the figures. The dynamic balancing of the vibratory unit 11 insures that one end of the vibratory unit counterbalances the other end when the unit is in motion with the assistance given to the several displacement forces by the sets of compression springs 13 and 14 and the motive power reduced to even one-half of that which would normally be required to function a unit of equal size but without the dynamic balancing provided .by my invention, a vibratory movement is maintained .4 which eificiently carries out the separating functions accomplished by my invention.

Material is fed into the feed box or inclined chute 17 of the vibratory unit 11 and is moved by the vibrating action to the undulated screen cloth 18 at point 19 in Fig. 1. Since the screen cloth commences to rise slightly at this point 19, the vibration causes the material deposited on the screen to spread to both sides thereby decreasing the thickness of the bed of material as it spreads over the surface of the screen permitting the fines to be separated from the larger material and pass through the openings of the screen cloth 18. Furthermore, the slight rise in the contour of the screen tends to retain the finer material while permitting the larger sizes to pass over the crest of the rise 20 which also improves the screening or separating efiiciency of the screen. On the downward slope 21 of the undulated screen cloth, the larger particles will move more rapidly due to the larger particles being heavier and, with the assistance of the vibrating motion and the action of the compression springs 13 and 14 the fines are separated and the larger material is advanced along the screen. As the material reaches the bottom of the curve 22 the velocity of movement is again reduced enabling the fine particles to pass the sceen openings. This action is cyclically repeated throughout the length of the vibrating unit 11 until the oversize material passes the discharge lips of each of the screens shown at 50 and 51.

Figs. 3 and 4 more clearly disclose the method of installing the undulated screen cloth on the rocker screen vibrating frames. Each vibrating frame includes a pcripheral clamping bar 23 which is the lower clamping bar curved to form the undulations or sinusoidal contour for the screen, the bar being welded rigidly to the inside of the side plates 25 of the vibrating unit 11. There is also an upper clamping bar 24 similar to the lower clamping bar 23 which is used to clamp and hold the screen cloth 18 in place. I provide rubber friction straps 26 on the top of the lower clamping bar 23 and on the bottom of the upper clamping bar 24 which tightly grip the screen cloth 18 in place with sufiicient tension applied by use of clamping bolt 27 to hold the screen cloth 18 in place. There are longitudinal supports 28 within each screen structure to provide three equal spaces between the interior of side plates 25 and extending the full length of the screen and curved to provide corresponding undulations for mounting the screen cloth 18. Rubber straps29 are provided on the longitudinal supports 28 to protect the screen cloth 18 when stretched for the full length of the screen and for avoiding possiblekinks or breakdowns in the screen cloth 18 which might be caused by the deposit of the material on the surface of the screen. I also provide clamping straps 30 over the longitudinal supports 28 to hold the screen cloth 18 in place. After the screen cloth 18 is located in position the clamping straps 30 are placed over the screen cloth above the longitudinal supports 28 and drawn down tightly by the clamping bolts 31. The metal cross bars 32 are welded into the lower clamping bar 23 at each rise in the undulations to avoid kinks or breakdowns and to maintain the rise in the undulations in the screen cloth 18.

As shown more clearly in Figs. 6 and 7 the vibrating unit consists of first and second deck screens superimposed one over the other with the means for imparting vibratory movement to the screens mounted between the decks. Both the upper and lower deck screens are symmetrical and these are mounted between the side plates 25 which are individually supported on aligned transverse axes through stub shafts 12. The screens are separately mounted between the side plates 25, the first deck screen being disposed above the vibratory mechanism and the second deck screen being disposed below the vibratory mechanism. In each instance the screens have a longitudinal section which is approximately sinusoidal or undulatory. The first deck screen shown generally at 52 is longitudinally offset, Figs. 1 and 3, and dephased from the second deck screen 53 thereby insuring a more thorough and complete treatment of the fines as they pass through the lowermost surface areas of the first deck screen and before they gravitate upon the rising portion of the surface of the second deck screen. That is, the raised portions of the sinusoidal configuration of screen 52 are-laterally staggered with respect to the raised portions of the sinusoidal configuration of screen 53. The sifting action and the delivery of oversize particles is more completely accomplished by this echelon arrangement of the two screens. The oversize particles are collected in receptacles aligned with the discharge lips 50 and 51 of the screens.

In the operation of the vibrating machine both fluid and agglomerate are fed into the machine over the first deck screen 52. Screen 52 is being vibrated both upwardly and downwardly while being moved longitudinally providing a composite orbital path of movement. The dephased positions of the superimposed undulated screens enables the material to be spread over the surfaces of the screen at different velocities. As the material reaches the lowermost portions of the curved surfaces in the first deck screen the fines are released to gravitate to the second deck screen but strike the second deck screen over a surface area whose curvature is displaced from the curvature of the upper deck screen thereby again subjecting the material to a second screening resulting in the ultimate collection of extremely fine fines and the grading away of larger size particles which are discharged over the lip 51, for collection. Thus the largest elements of the agglomerate are collected at discharge lip 50, the larger fines are collected at discharge lip 51, and the highly graded fines are discharged to the hopper and collected therein within the support 1a below the machine.

Although I have shown two symmetrically arranged screens mounted in the vibratory frame, I have done this for illustrative purposes and do not desire that my invention be interpreted as limited to a two deck structure. I have constructed many elements embodying my invention having a multiplicity of decks, such as four decks symmetrically distributed in the vibratory frame above and below the journals by which the vibratory frame is pivotally mounted. Accordingly, wherever in the claims I have referred to a pair of superimposed screens, I desire that this be interpreted to include more than one screen above and below the journals of the frame.

While I have described my invention in certain of its preferred embodiments, I realize that modifications may be made and I desire that it be understood that no limitations upon my invention are intended other than may be imposed by the scope of the appended claims.

What I claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent of the United States is as follows:

1. A separating machine for separating fines from agglomerate comprising a supporting structure, a vibratory unit extending longitudinally of said supporting structure and transversely journalled therein for vibratory movement, compression coil springs extending between said supporting structure and positions adjacent opposite ends of said vibratory unit for floating said vibratory unit in a plane inclined from the upper end to the lower end thereof in said supporting structure, an inclined chute attached to the upper end of said vibrating unit, a

' bracket centrally disposed beneath said chute, means on said supporting structure and connected with said bracket for cyclically impressing vibrations on said vibratory unit, said means and said bracket all being arranged immediately adjacent the upper end of said unit and substantially beneath said inclined chute and withinthe dimensional limits of the rearward extension of the inclined chute of said vibratory unit and screen structure carried by said vibratory unit for receiving agglomerate and finesat the upper end of said unit for separating the fines from the agglomerate and discharging theagglomerate at the lower end of the vibratory unit.'

2. A separating-machine for separatingfines from agglomerates comprising a supporting structure, a stationary frame mounted in an inclined plane'on said structure, bearings supported in transversely aligned positions substantially midway of said stationary frame, a vibratory unit extending longitudinally-between said bearings colineally of said'frame structure and having stub shafts extending from the opposite external sides of said vibratory unit and journalled in said bearings, an inclined chute connected with the upper end of said vibratory unit and extending rearwardly therefrom spring means extending between positions adjacent opposite ends of said vibratory unit and said frame structure, drive means mounted adjacent one end of said stationary frame, eccentric means interconnecting said drive means and said vibratory unit for imparting vibrations from said drive means to said vibratory unit, said eccentric means being located substantially beneath said inclined chute of said vibratory unit and adjacent the upper end of said vibratory unit and substantially sinusoidal screen structure carried by said vibratory unit and inclined in substantially the same inclined plane as the inclined plane of said stationary frame for receiving agglomerate and fines adjacent the upper end of said unit and separating the fines from the agglomerate under vibratory action of said vibratory unit and discharging agglomerate from the lower end of the vibratory unit.

3. A separating machine for separating fines from agglomerates as set forth in claim 2 in which said substantially sinusoidal screen structure comprises a pair of spaced superimposed screens one of which is located above the said bearings and the other of which is located below the said bearings with an unobstructed screening area located between said screens, said screens being undulated in the longitudinal sections thereof for presenting declining and rising surfaces to the fines and agglomerates deposited thereover.

4. A separating machine for separating fines from agglomerates as set forth in claim 2 in which said vibratory unit includes a pair of spaced side plates each of which supports one of said stub shafts, said stub shafts being journalled in said bearings and wherein said sub vibration about a central transverse pivot, an inclined chute connected with the upper end of said vibratory frame and extending rearwardly therefrom, a pair of screens carried by said vibratory frame, resilient means supporting opposite ends of said frame with respect to said supporting structure one of said screens being disposed above said pivot and the other of said screens being located below said pivot, said screens each having a longitudinal section which is substantially sinusoidal to present declining and rising adjacent surfaces to fines and agglomerates deposited on the screens, the said surfaces of said screens being longitudinally offset from each other with respect of said pivot and the declining and rising adjacent surfaces of one of the screens being laterally staggered with respect to the declining and rising adjacent surfaces of the other of said screens and means mounted on said supporting structure and beneath said inclined chute immediately adjacent the upper end of said vibratory frame and within the limits of a vertical plane extending downwardly from the rearward limit of said inclined chute for imparting vibratory movement thereto.

References Cited in the file of this patent 5 UNITED STATES PATENTS 8 Sturtevant et a1. Mar. 22, 1904 Mess et a1. June 7, 1938 Ramsey Dec. 24, 1940 Smith Sept. 16, 1941 Parks May 1, 1945 Johnson Nov. 18, 1958 FOREIGN PATENTS Great Britain 1893

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Classifications
U.S. Classification209/315, 209/392, 209/348
International ClassificationB07B1/28
Cooperative ClassificationB07B1/28
European ClassificationB07B1/28