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Publication numberUS2974090 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 7, 1961
Filing dateNov 24, 1959
Priority dateNov 24, 1959
Publication numberUS 2974090 A, US 2974090A, US-A-2974090, US2974090 A, US2974090A
InventorsLawrence D Schmidt
Original AssigneeAllied Chem
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
High velocity combustion-jet motivater coke oven battery
US 2974090 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

March 7, 1961 D. SCHMIDT 4,090

HIGH VELOCITY COMBUSTION-JET MOTIVATER COKE OVEN BATTERY Filed NOV. 24, 1959 3 Sheets-Sheet 1 0o 00 Q0 Q00 35 00 00 00 db Q FIG.5. I 72 INVENTOR LAWRENCE D. SCHMIDT ATTORNEY March 7, 1961 L. D. SCHMIDT 2,974,090

HIGH VELOCITY COMBUSTION-JET MOTIVATER COKE OVEN BATTERY Filed Nov. 24, 1959 s Sheets-Sheet s INVENTOR 3 LAWRENCE D. SCHMIDT BY EM ATTORNEY United States Patent HIGH VELOCITY COMBUSTION-JET MOTIVATER COKE OVEN BATTERY Lawrence D. Schmidt, New York, N .Y., assignor to Allied Chemical Corporation, New York, N.Y., a corporation of New York Filed Nov. 24, 1959, Ser. No. 855,081

9 Claims. (Cl. 202-12) This invention relates to a coke oven battery characterized by improved distribution of heat to the oven coking chambers and improved coking of the coal.

One problem heretofore encountered in the coking of coal in coke plants has been unequal distribution of heat to the oven coking chambers resulting in non-uniform and poor quality coke. This problem has occurred in by product coke ovens of both the vertically flued and horizontally flued types when using hydrogen-rich gas, e.g. coke oven gas as fuel, and has resided in the combustion flame being too short and extending only a short distance from the burners in the ends or bottom portions of the heating lines. The resulting uneven distribution of heat to the coking chambers produced coke containing green or uncarbonized coke and also some coke resulting from carbonization at too high a heating rate for optimum quality so that the coke generally was rejected.

Combustion flames have been lengthened heretofore in oven heating lines with attendant improvement in heat distribution to the coking chambers by recycling waste gas from the waste gas flue to the heating flues by means of exhauster fans and compressors. However the exhauster fans and compressors, which have moving parts are unsatisfactory for recycling the waste gas because the waste gas normally contains considerable amounts of sulfuric acid mist, nitrogen oxides, water vapor, oxygen, carbon dioxide and nitrogen, in addition to being at high temperature, resulting in prohibitive corrosion of their moving parts, bearing trouble, and clogging or fouling of this gas moving equipment. Moreover, gas coolers and scrubbers usually had to be employed ahead of the compressors with resultant loss of sensible heat and consequently loss of one of the major advantages of recycle.

One object of the present invention is to provide coke ovens providing substantially uniform distribution of heat to the oven coking chambers with attendant uniform coking of the coal therein.

Another object is to provide coke ovens providing recycle of hot corrosive waste gas to the oven heating flues without fouling and damaging of the gas moving equip ment.

Another object is to provide an improved coke oven battery providing recycling the hot corrosive waste gas to oven heating lines to improve heat distribution to the coking chambers without prior scrubbing and cooling of the waste gas with attendant loss of sensible heat.

Another objectis to provide an improved coke oven battery providing generation and addition of considerable heat to the waste gas being recycled to the heating flues for ultimate distribution together with the heat produced in the heating fines to the coking chamber.

Another object is to provide a process for the production of uniform saleable coke in high yield.

A further object is to provide a process achieving substantially uniform distribution of heat to oven coking chambers with attendant uniform coking of the coal.

" volume hydrogen and slowly combustible such as ice The coke oven battery improved by the present invenbers for preheating combustion air prior to its introduction into the heating flues, a sole flue communicating with the preheating means, and a waste gas flue or duct. The invention contemplates in combination with the coke oven battery structure a high velocity combustion-jet motivater comprising a chamber adapted to receive a combustible mixture of oxygen-containing gas and fluid fuel and, after burning of the mixture, to discharge a high velocity jet of gaseous combustion products, and one or more entrainment nozzles adapted to receive waste gas from the waste gas flue and the high velocity gaseous jet from the combustion chamber so that the gaseous jet entrains the waste gas. The entrainment nozzle or nozzles are arranged to discharge the mixture of gaseous combustion products and entrained waste gas into the coke oven battery structure, and ultimately therein into the end portion of the heating flues in heating service in the region of the main burners, to effect elongation of the flames within the flues with attendant improved distribution of heat to the coking chambers and to supplement the heat produced in the heating flues for the coking.

In preferred embodiments of the invention, the com bustion chamber is provided with an inlet for fluid fuel such as fuel gas produced by the coking operation, an auxiliary burner therewithin, and a discharge outlet of relatively small diameter disposed at the inlet of the entrainment nozzle which in turn is located within an enclosing feed casing or chamber connected with the waste gas flue. If a number of entrainment nozzles are used, the high velocity mixture of waste gas and combustion products passes through the nozzles serially so that the successive nozzles aspirate increments of waste gas from the feed chamber.

Depending upon the number of ovens in a battery and the capacity of the combustion chamber and auxiliary burner, one set or a number of sets of the combustion, chamber-entrainment nozzle assemblies may be used to supply recirculated waste gas and preferably uncooled waste gas to the battery. By the term rich fuel gas used herein is meant a fuel gas of relatively high hydrogen content generally in excess of 53% by volume hydrogen and of rapid combustibility such as coke oven gas or blue gas, as contrasted with lean gas which is relatively low in hydrogen content containing less than about 13% by ducer gas or blast furnace gas.

siderably improved distribution of heat to the oven coking chambers; (2) production of uniform or substantially Additional objects and advantages will be apparentas the invention is hereafter described in detail.

uniform saleable coke in high yields and obviating any.

appreciable production of green undercarbonized coke and coke resulting from carbonization at too high a heating rate; (3) elimination of the requirement of scrubbing and cooling the hot corrosive recycle waste gas with attendant loss of sensible heat; (4) avoidance of fouling still attained.

In the drawings:

Fig. 1 is a fragmentary plan view of a coke oven battery of the present invention.

Fig. 2 is a vertical elevational section taken on line 2--2 of Fig. 1.

Fig. 3 is a vertical elevational section taken on line 33 of Fig. 2.

Fig. 4 is a vertical sectional detail view of the high velocity combustion-jet motivater of the battery of Figs. 1 and 2, the jet motivater being disconnected from the battery.

Fig. 5 is a vertical sectional detail view of another embodiment of the combustion-jet motivater of the instant invention.

Referring to Figs. 1-3 of the drawings disclosing vertically flued underjet coke ovens modified in accordance with the present invention, heating walls 9 alternate in position side by side with coking chambers 10 and are formed with vertical heating flues 11. The coking chambers are typically 40 feet long, 13 feet high and 1.5 feet in average width, and typically 24 heating fiues are formed in each wall. Horizontal rich fuel gas supply manifold 12 extends beneath the heating flues and spaced vertical ducts 13 lead from the outlets of manifold 12 to main burners 14 disposed at alternate lower and higher levels in the lower portions of heating flues 11. Outer regenerator chambers 15 filled with slotted tile checkers are located beneath the heating flles and communicate at their upper portion through ports 16 with the lower portion of the heating flues adjacent burners 14. Sole flue 17, also called a bus flue, extends beneath regenerator 15 and communicates at its upper portion through openings or ports 18 with the lower portion of the regenerator. Cross-over fines 19 connect the burning heating flues with the non-burning flues.

Waste gas duct 20 communicates with the outer end of sole flue 17 and waste gas flue 21 formed in the masonry side wall. Combustion air supply duct 22 communicates with sole flue 17, and has inlet 23 for admission of air from basement space 24. Another combustion air supply duct 25 disposed similarly as duct 22 supplies air to another sole flue (not shown) which extends parallel to sole flue 17 in known manner and communicates through ports with the lower portion of the inner regenerator chamber of the oven. Distributing duct 26, which is a steel duct having an inner lining of refractory material and constructed so as not to leak gases under positive pressure, distributes waste gas entrained in the hot gaseous combustion products from the high velocity combustion-jet motivater (hereafter described), duct 26 extending adjacent waste gas flue 21 the length of the battery and connected at its upper portion by valved conduit 27 and other similar valved conduits spaced along its upper length to combustion air supply duct 22 and other similar combustion air supply ducts (not shown). In Fig. 1 the chimney stack is designated by 35.

Mushroom type air reversing valve 28 and waste gas reversing valve 29 are disposed directly above air supply duct 22 and waste gas duct 20 respectively, valve 28 being in an open position as shown and valve 29 being in a closed position. Butterfly valve 30 for controlling flow of recycled waste gas is provided in conduit 27, and another butterfly valve 31 for shutting ofli flow of recycled waste gas on reversal is also provided in conduit 27, valve 30 being in partially open, throttling position as shown. Valve 31 shown in fully open position, is operated by the reversing mechanism 32. Reversing mechanism 32 for operating the butterfly valve 31 is synchronized with the operating mechanism for waste gas and air reversing valves 28 and 29 respectively in known manner, so that when the reversal of flow of combustion air and waste gas is made by moving valve 28 to the closed position and valve 29 to open position to cut off flow of combustion air to regenerator 15 and enable flow of hot waste gas through this regenerator, butterfly valve 31 is moved to the closed position to cut off flow of the entrained wast gas to air supply duct 22. When valve 31 in conduit 27 is closed, similar butterfly valves in alternate conduits similar to conduit 27 spaced along the length and connecting the upper portions of distributing duct 26 with air supply ducts similar to duct 22 and their corresponding air reversing valves will open and the corresponding waste gas reversal valves close, to enable reverse flow of the waste gas and hot gaseous combustion products to the corresponding sole flue and regenerator. Pillar walls 33 provide support for the ovens. Oven buckstay is designated at 34 in Fig. 2.

In accordance with the invention, high velocity combustion-jet motivater 37 is connected at its discharge outlet end by flanged conduit 38 integral therewith to flanged conduit 39 by bolting, conduit 39 being connected at its opposite end to distributing duct 26. Conduits 38 and 39, distributing duct 26, conduit 27 and duct 22 together form an enclosed or substantially enclosed passageway communicating the discharge outlet of jet motivater 37 with sole flues 17. Distributing duct 26 is connected at its upper portion by spaced passageways with any desired number of the sole flues, the passageways being formed by valved conduits similar to valved conduit 27 spaced along its upper length as described and connected to air'supply ducts similar to air supply ducts 22 which in turn are connected to the sole flues, the sole flues communicating with the regenerators and heating flues. Waste gas supply conduit 69 (Fig. l) connects waste gas inlet 67 of motivater 37 with waste gas flue 21 (Fig. 2), supply conduit 69 being connected to flanged edge 68 of inlet 67 by bolting. Combustion chamber 40 is disposed within motivater casing 41 and discharges a high velocity jet of hot gaseous combustion products from its nozzle-shaped discharge outlet 42 through axially aligned entrainment nozzles 43 and 44 as motive fluid for operating the motivater. Jet motivater 37 rests on supporting members 45 and 46. As shown in more detail in Fig. 4, jet motivater 37 comprises combustion chamber 40 formed of stainless steel which is resistant but still susceptible to heat damage at the high temperatures encountered. The combustion chamber can be formed of heat resistant refractory material such as fire clay, magnesite, etc., if desired. Steel combustion chamber 40 is provided with a plurality of spaced small diameter orifices 48 each of typical diameter of 0.01 inch in its wall, and has coolant jacket 49 surrounding its orificed Wall. Coolant supply conduit 50 extends into jacket 49 wherefrom coolant weeps or passes through the orifices into the combustion chamber to cool the chamber wall sufliciently to avoid heat damage thereto. The fluid coolant can be water in which case as the water evaporates from the inside wall of chamber 40, the heat of evaporation and the movement of the generated steam protect the wall from the effect of the high temperatures prevailing in the combustion zone. If desired the coolant can be steam. Further, the combustion chamber can be constructed of material permeable to water or steam such as sintered metal or silicon carbide, if desired, and then cooled by passing steam or water from the jacket 49 into combustion chamber 40. Burner 51 is provided within combustion chamber 40 adjacent its inlet 52, inlet 52 enabling inflow of a mixture of fluid fuel, e.g. fuel gas such as coke oven gas and oxygen-containing gas into the inlet 52 and thence to burner 51, the fuel gas-oxygencontaining gas mixture being supplied from a compressor (not shown) through flanged conduit 53 having a frustro conical portion integral with combustion chamber 40. Igniter inlet 54 provides for introduction into combustion chamber 40 of suitable igniting means, e.g. a spark plug, pilot light or glow tube. Combustion chamber 40 is welded to flanged cover plate 55 and cover plate 55 is bolted to flanged edge 56 of motivater casing 41, casing 4-1 being of stainless steel.

Entrainment nozzle 43 constructed of or lined with heat resistant material, for instance silicon carbide or zirconia, is mounted in casing 41 by means of supporting members 57 and 58, nozzle 43 beingaxially aligned and communicating at its inlet end portion with nozzle-shaped discharge outlet 42 of combustion chamber 40. Entrainment nozzle 43 has inwardly tapered inlet portion 59, outwardly tapered outlet portion 60 and throat portion 61 intermediate the inlet and outlet portions. Nozzle 43 has typical length of 3 feet and throat diameter of 6 inches. The inwardly tapered inlet portion of nozzle 43 has typical largest diameter of 1 foot and its outwardly tapered outlet portion has typical largest diameter'of 9 inches. Another entrainment nozzle 44 of larger dimensions than nozzle 43 is integral with casing 41 and axially aligned with nozzle 43, nozzle 44 communicating at an inlet end portion with the discharge outlet of nozzle 43. Nozzle 44 is formed with inwardly tapered inlet portion 63, outwardly tapered outlet portion 64 and throat portion 65 intermediate the inlet and outlet portions. Nozzle 44 has typical length of 6 feet and throat diameter of 1 /2 feet. The inwardly tapered inlet portion of nozzle 44 has typical largest diameter of 3 feet and its outwardly tapered outlet portion has typical largest diameter of 3% feet. Casing 41 terminates at the inlet end of nozzle 44, and this casing has typical length of 12 feet and diameter of 3 /2 feet. The entrainment nozzles function by reason of the high velocity gaseous jet from the combustion chamber passing serially therethrough, the gaseous jet producing suction as it passes first through nozzle 43 and then through nozzle 44. The suction draws waste gas from Waste gas flue 21 through conduit 69 and into casing 41, whence a portion of the gas is drawn into inlet portion 59 of nozzle 43 and another portion of the gas is drawn into inlet portion 63 of nozzle 44 by the suction.

The jet motivater of Fig. 5 is similar to the motivator of Fig. 4 except that its combustion chamber 70 is imperforate and constructed of or lined with fire clay or other suitable high temperature refractory material such as magnesite, zirconia, or silicon carbide and does not have a coolant jacket surrounding the combustion chamber. Further combustion chamber 70 is bolted to flanged cover plate 71 which in turn is bolted to flanged edge 72 of pump casing 73. Chamber 70 is also supported in casing 73 by other supporting means (not shown) well known in the art.

The present invention is also applicable to improve-- ment of horizontal flued coke ovens and to improved coking of coal using these ovens, by providing for flame elongation in the heating flues with attendant substantially uniform distribution of heat to the coking chambers and uniform coking of the coal. The horizontal flued ovens, often used for production of foundry coke, are heated by flames burning horizontally and serially in the heating flues instead of vertically and parallel as in the previously described ovens. The horizontal flued ovens of the present invention are of two types: (1) regenerative, and (2) recuperative ovens. In the horizontal flued regenerative oven, the coking chamber is typically 36 feet long, 11 feet high and 19 /2 inches in average width. Six heating flues are typically located on each side of the coking chamber and one sole flue is located beneath the coking chamber. mounted on the coke discharge side and two on the pusher side, the gas burners entering the ends of the heating flues from riser pipes or manifolds outside the battery. The top flue is generally not provided with a gas burner and is designed to be maintained cooler. The flues of one oven are separated from those of the next by a division wall extending downwardly between the regenerators to the concrete mat supporting the battery. Two vertical flues are formed in this division wall at the pusher end for the passage of preheated combustion air from the regenerator, or, after reversal at the end of the half-hour period, the counter passage of hot waste gas to the regenerator. Two regenerators are located beneath Three gas burners are typically two central transverse flues extending the length of the battery conducting combustion air to the regenerators on one side or waste gas to the chimney stack from the regenerators on the other side. Using the horizontal flued regenerative ovens, reversals is made only of air and waste gas, and the fuel gas burns .continuously at all burners.

The horizontal flued recuperative ovens differ from the regenerative ovens by having recuperators instead of regenerators, the recuperators each comprising narrow thin wall ducts of refractory construction for passage of combustion air interlaid between narrow passages for conducting hot waste gas in counterdirection, the air being preheated during its passage by heat exchange with the hot waste gas. In the recuperative ovens the air, which is already somewhat warmed by passage under the battery, passes upwardly through the narrow vertical passages of the recuperator and into a sub-sole flue extending parallel to the oven axis. The preheated air passes to one side at the end of the sub-sole flue, passes upwardly through a vertical duct in the division wall and thence passes through ports into the horizontal heating flues, or the air may pass in part to the other end of the oven along horizontal flues extending parallel to the main sole flue'and rise at the other end through a vertical duct in the division wall to the air ports and thence into the heating flues at that end. Flow of combustion air and burning gas in the heating flues is continuous from the top to the bottom flue, and the waste gas divides on reaching the bottom flue with a portion thereof traversing the bottom heating flue and the remainder the sole flue where it preheats the air enteringalongside. Both portions of waste gas ultimately commingle adjacent the end of the sole flue and enter the upper tiers of horizontal passages in the recuperator, returning through the bottom tiers of horizontal passages and thence passing to the waste gas or chimney flue. Both the horizontal flued regenerative and recuperator ovens are described in more detail in the technical book Coal Carbonization by H. C. Porter, 1924, pages l79 thereof. The high velocity combustion-jet motivater of the instant invention would be connected to either of these horizontally flued ovens in a manner such that the waste gas inlet of the jet motivater would communicate with the waste gas or chimney flue of the battery by a'conduit or other suitable enclosed passageway, and the jet motivater discharge outlet for the gaseous jet having the entrained waste gas would be connected by a conduit or enclosed passageway with the passageway or duct supplying combustion air to the regenerators (in the regenerative ovens) or to the recuperators (in the recuperator ovens). v V j The process of the invention, in its broader aspects involves subjecting a coking coal charge to coking by indirect heating in the oven coking chambers having interposed flued heating walls, burning rich fuel gas, e.g. coke oven gas in the heating flues to obtain flames in an end portion of the flues with attendant distribution of heat through the heating wall to the coking chambers, hot, corrosive waste gas also being obtained from such burning, burning fluid fuel, e.g. fuel gas such as coke oven gas under pressure in a separate combustion zone to obtain hot gaseous combustion products, and discharging the hot gaseous combustion products from the combustion zone and passing the same as a high velocity jet through an entrainment nozzle to produce suction. The hot corrosive waste gas is entrained in the high velocity gaseous jet passing through the nozzle by reason of the suction and the waste gas propelled within the nozzle by taining gas is preheated in the preheating'zone. The preheated hot gaseous stream containing the waste gas together with the oxygen-containing gas is then withdrawn .from the preheating zone and passed into an end portion of the heating flues in the region of the burning fuel gas. Incombustible constituents of the waste gas cause combustion of the rapidly combustible rich fuel gas to take place at a slower rate thereby effecting elongation of the flames within the heating flues with attendant substantially uniform distribution of their heat to the coking chambers and uniform coking of the coal.

More specifically, in accordance with the process using the vertically flued underjet coke ovens, coking coal such as bituminous coal charged to coking chambers 10 from the larry car is subjected to coking therein by distribution of heat to the coking chambers from heating flues 11. The coking can be low, medium or high temperature carbonization, typical flue temperatures employed ranging from about 1700 F.2000 F. for the low, about 2000 F.2200 F. for the medium, and about 2200" F.2600 F. for the high temperature carbonization. Rich fuel gas, e.g. coke oven gas is supplied to burners 14 of heating flues 11 through manifold 12 and ducts 13 terminating at the burners. The rich rapidly combustible fuel gas is burned by burners 14 to normally obtain nonelongated flames extending only in the lower portion of heating lines 11 with attendant uneven distribution of heat through heating walls 9 to the coking chambers 10. Air is withdrawn from basement space 24 through inlet 23 of combustion air supply duct 22 and continuously passed through duct 22 to sole fine 17, and thence through ports 18 to regenerator chamber 15 packed with the checkers. The air is preheated during its passage upwardly through the checkers of the regenerator and then introduced through ports 16 into the lower portion of heating flues 11 adjacent burners 14 to support the combination. Hot corrosive waste gas normally containing sulfuric acid, nitrogen oxides, carbon dioxide, water vapor, oxygen and nitrogen obtained from the combustion in heating flues 11 is withdrawn from the upper portion of heating flues 11 and through horizontal flues 19, and then downwardly through the non-burning flues. From the non-burning flues the waste gas is passed through the checkers of another regenerator chamber and then through the ports at the lower portion of the regenerator to sole flue 75 (Fig. 3), the waste gas being then withdrawn from the sole flue through a waste gas duct 76 (Fig. l) to the waste gas flue 21.

Mixture of fluid fuel, preferably fuel gas, e.g. coke oven gas, natural gas or methane, or oxygen-containing gas, e.g. air, oxygen or oxygen-enriched air is continuously passed under pressure from a compressor through conduit 53 and inlet 52 into combustion chamber 40 of the high velocity combustion-jet motivater. Coke oven gas is the preferred fuel gas. Fuel oil can be used instead of the fuel gas, if desired. The fuel is continuously or substantially continuously ignited and burned in combustion chamber under superatmospheric pressure of about 1-50 p.s.i.g. to obtain hot gaseous combustion products having typical temperature of about 3600 F.4000 F. Cooling water at typical temperature of about 60 F 80 F. is passed through conduit 50 into jacket 49 sur rounding the combustion chamber whereby the cooling water weeps into the combustion chamber through orifices 48 in the chamber wall to cool the chamber wall sufliciently by evaporative cooling to avoid damage from the contained hot gases. If desired, steam can be used as the coolant. The gaseous combustion products and steam are continuously discharged from combustion chamber 40 through its nozzle-shaped outlet 42 as a jet of very high velocity, typically under these temperature conditions at velocity of about 1000-5000 feet per second and passed serially through entrainment nozzles 43 and 44 thereby imparting much of the momentum of the jetted gases to the waste gas. Waste gas from waste gas flue 21 is continuously drawn through conduit 69 by reason of the suction created by the momentum of the jetted gases and introduced through inlet 67 into motivater casing 41. The waste gas, which has typical temperature of about 400 F.-700 F. is entrained in the gaseous jet passing serially through entrainment nozzles 43 and 44, a portion of the waste gas being drawn into inlet end portion 59 of nozzle 43 and the remaining portion being drawn into inlet end portion 63 of nozzle 44. The waste gas is compressed and propelled by the gaseous jet passing through the entrainment nozzles and finally discharged from entrainment nozzle 43 through conduits 38 and 39 into distributing conduit 26. The high temperature gaseous combustion products of the jet contain a quantity of heat equivalent to typically from about 900-1100 B.t.u.s per pound and because the gaseous combustion products have a considerably higher temperature than the recycle Waste gas, heat flows therefrom to the waste gas. Most of this considerable quantity of heat is ultimately introduced into the heating flues and distributed together with the heat produced in the heating flues to the coking chambers. The ratio of entrained waste gas to motive gaseous combustion products is large using the high velocity combustion-jet motivater of this invention, the weight ratio being typically from about 3:1 to 10:1 respectively.

With air reversing valve 28 and butterfly valves 30 and 31 also in an open position as shown and waste gas reversing valve 29 in a closed position, a portion of the waste gas together with the gaseous combustion products of the jet passes through conduit 27 into admixture with the air stream flowing through combustion air supply duct 22. The resulting mixture of combustion air, hot waste gas and hot gaseous combustion products of the jet then flow via sole channel 17, ports or openings 18, regenerator 15 and ports 16 into the lower portion of heating flues 11, preferably beside burners 14 in the region of the burning rich fuel gas, whereby the flame therein is considerably elongated by reason of the incombustible materials present in the waste gas with attendant substantially uniform distribution of its heat to coking chambers 10 and uniform coking of the coal.

Coking of a bituminous coal using the improved vertically flued coke ovens and coking process of the present invention resulted in production of uniform saleable coke in high yields, and no appreciable production of green, undercarbonized coke occurred. Further it was unnecessary to scrub and cool the hot, corrosive recycle waste gas prior to entraining and pumping the same by the jet motivater and no fouling or damaging of the motivater occurred.

Although certain preferred embodiments of the invention have been disclosed for purpose of illustration, it will be evident that various chan es and modifications may be made therein without departing from the scope and spirit of the invention.

What is claimed is:

1. In a coke oven battery, the combination of coking chambers having interposed flued heating walls, burners dlsposed in the end portion of the heating flues, fuel gas supply ducts for supplying fuel gas to the burners, preheating means for heating combustion air prior to its introduction into the heating flues, a sole flue communieating with said preheating means, a waste gas duct, a combustion chamber having an outlet for discharge of a hot gaseous combustion products as a high velocity gaseous jet, an entrainment nozzle disposed adjacent and communicating at an inlet end portion thereof with the discharge outlet of the combustion chamber, fluid fuel supply means for supplying fluid fuel into the combustion chamber, a first enclosed passageway communicating the waste gas duct and the entrainment nozzle, and a second enclosed passageway for conducting the gaseous jet having the waste gas entrained therein from the entrainment nozzle discharge outlet for ultimate introduction into the spam end portion of the heating flues in the region of the gas burners therein.

2. In a coke oven battery, the combination of coking chambers, vertically flued heating walls alternating in position side by side with the coking chambers, burners disposed in the lower portion of the heating flues, richtion with the lower portion of the regenerator chamber,

a waste gas flue communicating with the sole flue, a combustion air supply duct interconnecting the sole flue and a source of combustion air, a combustion chamber having a burner for fluid fuel therein and a nozzle-shaped outlet spaced from said burner for discharge of hot gaseous combustion products as a high velocity gaseous jet, an entrainment nozzle disposed adjacent and communicating at an inlet end portion thereof with the nozzle-shaped discharge outlet of the combustion chamber, fluid fuel supply means for supplying fluid fuel to the combustion chamber burner, a first enclosed passageway communicating the waste gas flue and the inlet portion of the entrainment nozzle, and a second enclosed passageway communicating the discharge outlet of the entrainment nozzle and the sole flue whereby the gaseous jet having waste gas entrained therein is conducted to the sole flue and thence together with the combustion air through the regenerator chamber into the lower portion of the heating flues in the region of the gas burners therein.

3. Ina coke oven battery, the combination of coking chambers, vertically flued heating walls alternating in position side by side with the coking chambers, burners disposed in the lower portion of the heating flues, a horizontal rich fuel gas supply manifold extending beneath the regenerator chambers, spaced vertical ducts interconnecting the manifold outlets and the burners in the lower portion of the heating flues, the fuel gas being burned in the heating flues to normally obtain nonelongated flames in the lower portion of the flues with attendant uneven distribution of heat to the coking chambers, combustion air preheating regenerator chambers beneath the heating flues communicating at their upper portions by ports therein with the lower portions of the heating flues adjacent the gas burners, a sole flue extending beneath the regenerator chamber and communicating at its upper portion through a plurality of spaced openings therein with the lower portion of the regenerator chamber, a waste gas flue communicating with the sole flue, a combustion air supply duct interconnecting the sole flue adjacent the point of communication of the waste gas flue and a source of combustion air, a casing having an inlet for waste gas, a first entrainment nozzle mounted in the casing, said first nozzle being in axial alignment with and communicating at an inlet end portion thereof with a nozzle-shaped discharge outlet of a combustion chamber also mounted in the casing, the inlet end portion of said first nozzle being adjacent the casing waste gas inlet and providing for introduction of a portion of the waste gas into said nozzle, a second entrainment nozzle in axial alignment with and communicating at an inlet end portion thereof with a discharge outlet of said first entrainment nozzle, the inlet end portion of said second nozzle also providing for introduction of waste gas into said second nozzle, each entrainment nozzle having a passage therethrough including an inwardly tapered inlet portion, an outwardly tapered outlet portion, and a throat portion intermediate the tapered inlet and outlet portions, the combustion chamber formed of refractory material and having an inlet for mixture of fuel gas and oxygen-containing gas and a nozzle-shaped outlet remote from said inlet for continuous discharge of hot gaseous combustion products as a high velocity gase- I 1 ous jet into and through the first and second entrainment nozzles as motive fluid, a burner within said combustion chamberadjacent and communicating with its fuel gas inlet, a conduit for continuous supply of mixture of fuel gas and oxygen-containing gas to the combustion chamber inlet and thence to the burner therein, a waste gas supply conduit communicating the waste gas flue and the casing waste gas inlet, an entrained waste gas distributing duct extending beneath the fuel gas supply manifold, the last-mentioned duct being interconnected and communicating with the discharge outlet of said second nozzle by an enclosed passageway, and a valved conduit interconnecting an upper portion of the waste gas distributing duct and the combustion air supply duct whereby the gaseous jet having waste gas entrained therein is continu:

ously conducted to the air supply duct, thence together 7 with the combustion air into the sole flue, through the regenerator chamber and finally into the lower portion of the heating flues in the region of the gas burners therein, incombustib-le constituents of the waste gas effecting elongation of the combustion flames within the heating flue with attendant substantially uniform distribution of heat to the coking chambers and substantially uniform coking of the coal.

4. In a coke oven battery, the combination of coking chambers having interposed flued heating walls, burners disposed in the end portion'of the heating flues, fuel gas supply ducts for supplying fuel gas to the burners, preheating means for heating combustion air prior to its introduction into the heating flues, a sole flue communicating with said preheating means, a waste gas duct, a combustion chamber having an outlet for discharge of hot gaseous combustion products as a high velocity gaseous jet, a plurality of spaced orifices in the combustion chamber wall, a coolant jacket encompassing the chamber orificed wall, a fluid coolant supply conduit extending into the cooling jacket whereby coolant passes into the combustion chamber to cool the chamber wall sufficiently to avoid heat damage thereto, an entrainment nozzle disposed adjacent and communicating at an inlet end portion thereof with the discharge outlet of the cornbustion chamber, fluid fuel supply means for supplying fluid fuel into the combustion chamber, a first enclosed passageway communicating the waste gas duct and the entrainment nozzle, and a second enclosed passageway for conducting the gaseous jet having the waste gas entrained therein from the entrainment nozzle discharge outlet for ultimate introduction into the end portion of I the heating flues in the region of the gas burners therein.

5. In a coke oven battery, the combination of coking chambers, vertically flued heating walls alternating in position side by side with the coking chambers, burners disposed in the lower portion of the heating flues, a horizontal rich fuel gas supply manifold extending beneath the regenerator chambers, spaced vertical ducts interconnecting the manifold outlets and the burners in the lower portion of the heating flues, the fuel gas being burned in the heating flues to normally obtain non-elongated flames in the lower portion of the flues with attendant uneven distribution of heat to the coking chambers, combustion air preheating regenerator chambers beneaththe heating flues communicating at their upper portions by ports therein with the lower portions of the heating flues adjacent the gas burners, a sole flue extending beneath the regenerator and communicating at its upper portion through a plurality of spaced openings therein with the lower portion of the regenerator, a waste gas flue communicating with the sole flue, a combustion air supply duct interconnecting the sole flue adjacent the point of communication of the waste gas flue and a source of combustion air, a casing having an inlet for waste gas, a first entrainment nozzle mounted in the casing, said first nozzle being in axial alignment with and communicating at an inlet end portion thereof with a nozzleshaped discharge outlet of a combustion chamber also mounted in the casing, the inlet end portion of said first nozzle being adjacent the casing waste gas inlet and providing for introduction of a portion of the waste gas into said nozzle, a second entrainment nozzle in axial alignment with and communicating at an inlet end portion thereof with a discharge outlet of said first entrainment nozzle, the inlet end portion of said second nozzle also providing for introduction of waste gas into said second nozzle, each entrainment nozzle having a tapered passage therethrough including an inwardly tapered inlet portion, an outwardly tapered outlet portion and a throat portion intermediate said tapered inlet and outlet portions, said casing terminating at and integral with the inlet end portion of said second entrainment nozzle, said combustion chamber fabricated of material susceptible to heat damage and having an inlet for mixture of fuel gas and oxygen-containing gas and the nozzle-shaped outlet remote from said inlet for continuous discharge of hot gaseous combustion products as a high velocity gaseous jet into and through the first and second entrainment nozzles as motive fluid, a burner for fuel gas within the combustion chamber adjacent and communicating with its fuel gas inlet, a conduit for continuous supply of mixture of fuel gas and oxygen-containing gas to the combustion chamber inlet and thence to the burner therein, a plurality of spaced orifices in the combustion chamber wall, a coolant jacket encompassing the chamber orificed wall, a fluid coolant supply conduit extending into the cooling jacket whereby coolant passes into the combustion chamber to cool the chamber Wall suthciently to avoid heat damage thereto, a waste gas supply conduit communicating the waste gas flue and the casing waste gas inlet, an entrained waste gas distributing duct extending adjacent the waste gas flue and beneath the fuel gas supply manifold, the Waste gas distributing duct communicating with the discharge outlet of said second nozzle by an enclosed passageway, and a valved conduit interconnecting an upper portion of the waste gas distributing duct and the combustion air supply conduit, whereby the gaseous jet having waste gas entrained therein is continuously conducted to the air supply duct, then together with the combustion air into the sole flue, through the regenerator chamber and finally into the lower portion of the heating flues in the region of the gas burners therein, incombustible constituents of the waste gas effecting elongation of the combustion flames within the heating flues with attendant substan: tially uniform distribution of heat to the coking chambers and substantially uniform coking of the coal.

6. A process for production of uniform coke which comprises subjecting a coking coal charge to coking by indirect heating in coke oven coking chambers having interposed flued heating walls, burning rich fuel gas in the heating flues to obtain flames in an end portion of the fines with attendant distribution of heat through the heating walls to the coking chambers for the coking, hot corrosive waste gas also being obtained from said burning, burning fluid fuel under pressure in a separate combustion zone to obtain hot gaseous combustion products, discharging the hot gaseous combustion products from said combustion zone and passing the same as a high velocity hot gaseous jet through an entrainment nozzle, entraining the hot waste gas in the high velocity jet passing through the nozzle and propelling the waste gas within the nozzle by the gaseous jet, passing a stream of oxygen-containing gas into a preheating zone, passing the hot gaseous jet containing the entrained waste gas into admixture with the oxygencontaining gas stream prior to its introduction into said preheating zone, preheating the gaseous stream containing the Waste gas together with the oxygen-containing gas in said preheating zone, and withdrawing the hot gaseous stream containing the waste gas together with the oxygen-containing gas from the preheating zone and passing the same into an end portion of the heating flues in the region of the burning fuel gas therein, incombustible constituents of said Waste gas effecting elongation of the flames within the flues with attendant substantially uniform distribution of heat to the coking chambers and uniform coking of the coal.

7. A process for production of uniform coke which comprises subjecting a coking coal charge to coking by indirect heating in coke oven coking chambers having interposed vertically flued heating walls, burning rich fuel gas in the heating flues to obtain flames in in a lower portion of the flues with attendant distribution of heat through the heating walls to the coking chambers for the coking, hot corrosive Waste gas also being obtained from the combustion, continuously burning fuel gas under pressure in a separate combustion zone to obtain hot gaseous combustion products, continuously discharging the hot gaseous products from said combustion zone and passing the same as a high velocity hot gaseous jet serially through a first entrainment nozzle and thence through a second entrainment nozzle communicating with said first nozzle, continuously entraining the hot waste gas in the high velocity jet passing through the entrainment nozzles and propelling the waste gas within said nozzles by the gaseous jet, continuously passing a stream of air into a regenerative preheating zone, continuously passing the hot gaseous jet containing the entrained waste gas into admixture with the air stream prior to its introduction into said preheating zone, regeneratively preheating the gaseous stream containing the waste gas together with the air in said preheating zone, and continuously Withdrawing the hot gaseous stream containing the waste gas together with the air and passing the same into a lower portion of the heating flues in a region of the burning fuel gas, incombustible materials present in said waste gas effecting elongation of the flames in the heating flues with attendant substantially uniform distribution of heat to the coking chambers and uniform coking of the coal.

8. A process for production of uniform coke which comprises subjecting a coking coal charge to coking by indirect heating in coke oven coking chambers having interposed flued heating walls, burning rich fuel gas in the heating flues to obtain flames in an end portion of the flues with attendant distribution of heat through the heating Walls to the coking chambers for the coking, hot corrosive waste gas also being obtained from said burning, burning fluid fuel under pressure in a separate combustion zone to obtain hot gaseous combustion products, introducing fluid coolant into the last-mentioned combustion zone to cool the combustion zone wall sufiiciently to avoid heat damage thereto, discharging the hot gaseous combustion products from said combustion zone and passing the same as a high velocity hot gaseous jet through an entrainment nozzle, entraining the hot waste gas in the high velocity jet passing through the nozzle and propelling the waste gas within the nozzle by the gaseous jet, passing a stream of oxygen-containing gas into a preheating zone, passing the hot gaseous jet containing the entrained waste gas into admixture with the oxygen-containing gas stream prior to its introduction into said preheating zone, preheating the gaseous stream containing the waste gas together with the oxygen-containing gas in said preheating zone, and withdrawing the hot gaseous stream containing the waste gas together with the oxygen-containing gas from the preheating zone a and passing the same into an end portion of the heating flues in the region of the burning fuel gas therein, incombustible constituents of said waste gas effecting elongation of the flames within the flues with attendant substantially uniform distribution of heat to the coking chambers and uniform coking of the coal.

9. A process for production of uniform coke which comprises subjecting a bituminous coal charge to coking by indirect heating in coke oven coking chambers having interposed vertically flued heating walls, burning coke oven gas in the heating flues to obtain flames in a lower 13 portion of the fiues with attendant distribution of heat through the heating walls to the coking chambers for the coking, hot corrosive waste gas containing sulfuric acid, nitrogen oxides, water vapor, oxygen, carbon dioxide and nitrogen also being obtained from the combustion, continuously burning coke-oven gas under superatmospheric pressure of about 1 50 p.s.i.g. in a separate combustion zone to obtain hot gaseous combustion products having temperature of about 3600 F.4000 F., continuously discharging the hot gaseous combustion products from said combustion zone and passing the same as a high velocity .hot gaseous jet serially through a first entrainment nozzle and thence through a second entrainment nozzle communicating with said first nozzle, continuously entraining the hot waste gas in the high velocity gaseous jet passing through the entrainment nozzles and propelling the hot waste gas within said nozzles by the gaseous jet,

continuously passing a stream of air into a regenerative preheating zone, continuously passing thehot gaseous jet containing the 'entrained waste gas into admixture with the air stream prior to its introduction into the preheating zone, regeneratively preheating the gaseous stream containing the waste gas together with the air in said preheating zone, and continuously withdrawing the hot v gaseous stream containing the waste gas together with the air and passing the same into a lower portion of the the coking chambers and uniform coking of the .coal.

No references cited.

Non-Patent Citations
Reference
1 *None
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3953299 *Aug 14, 1974Apr 27, 1976Bethlehem Steel CorporationCoke oven having a low burner heating wall and a high burner heating wall
US4164541 *Nov 22, 1976Aug 14, 1979Lubas WilliamMixing acid and base for fertilizer
US20110192395 *Sep 9, 2009Aug 11, 2011Uhde GmbhAir distributing device for primary air in coke ovens
Classifications
U.S. Classification201/41, 202/135, 202/151
International ClassificationF23L1/02, C10B21/18, C10B21/10, C10B21/12
Cooperative ClassificationC10B21/18, F23L1/02, C10B21/12, C10B21/10
European ClassificationF23L1/02, C10B21/12, C10B21/18, C10B21/10