Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2974850 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 14, 1961
Filing dateMay 10, 1954
Priority dateMay 10, 1954
Publication numberUS 2974850 A, US 2974850A, US-A-2974850, US2974850 A, US2974850A
InventorsLouis Mayer
Original AssigneeOwens Illinois Glass Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Combined shipping container and dispensing receptacle
US 2974850 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

L. MAYER March 14, 1961 COMBINED SHIPPING CONTAINER AND DISPENSING RECEPTACLE Filed May 10, 1954 l 71 8 54, TI ME O REORDER INVENTOR.

LOUIS MAYER QMW /F ATTORNEY United States Patent COMBINED SHIPPING CONTAINER AND DISPENSING RECEPTACLE Louis Mayer, Jackson Heights, N.Y., assignor, by mesne assignments, to Owens Illinois Glass Company, Toledo, Ohio, a corporation of Ohio Filed May 10, 1954, Ser. No. 428,551

3 Claims. (Cl. 229-37) The present invention relates to a combined shipping container and dispensing receptacle particularly adapted for use with coiled filamentary material such as rope, wire and the like.

It is often desired that coils of rope, wire or the like be shipped in a covered or packaged condition in a manner similar to other commodities. In order for such packaging to be fully effectual, it must completely enclose the coil. Any openings or interstices in the package will obviously detract from the security which the package affords, for example, by permitting the entry into the package of dirt, dust or other foreign materials.

It also is often the case that when the coil has arrived at its point of use the coiled material is not used up all at once, individual lengths of the wire or rope being severed from the coil from time to time as the need arises. If the coil is removed from its shipping container, or the shipping container must be destroyed in order to provide access to the coil, many of the advantages of the initial packaging of the coil will be lost in time, particularly where the coil, in use, must be located in places where susceptibility to dirt, damage or deterioration is very great, a not uncommon situation in many manufacturing plants. It therefore is advisable that the coil, when it has arrived at its point of use, be contained within adispensing receptacle which permits access to the coiled material so that it can be dispensed or used, yet which protects that coiled material against adverse external influences to the maximum degree possible consistent with the availability thereof for dispensing.

While the coiled material is being dispensed, and par-.

ticularly if the coil is of an appreciable size, it is important for the user thereof to know how much of the coiled material remains within the container, so that renewal of the supply thereof may be provided for in a timely manner.

Thus it will be seen that the considerations attendant upon the proper protection of coils of material from the time that they are shipped to the time that they are fully used up involves numerous antithetical conditions. The complete protection of the coil during shipping requires that the shipping container be substantially sealed, and this is, of course, antithetical to the requirement that the dispensing receptacle provide access to the coiled material. To provide a shipping container sufiiciently strong and rigid to protect the coiled material under the rough handling to which it may be subjected during shipping and transhipping suggests a structure which would be essentially unsuited for use as a dispensing receptacle. In the dispensing receptacle, while access to the coiled material is required, the opening in the dispensing receptacle required therefor should be of minimal size in order to provide the greatest amount of protection to the contents while they are standing about ready for use, and this is antithetical to a structure in which the amount of material remaining in the coil is at all times readily Patented Mar. 14, 1961 2 visible to the user thereof, so that replacement may be made when necessary and without involving any delay.

The nature, complexity and antithetical nature of these various considerations strongly suggests that a single combined shipping container and dispensing receptacle could not possible satisfy all of them in a satisfactory manner without involving an exceedingly complex structure and arrangement, thus involving not only excessive expense but also a considerable problem in erection, filling, sealing prior to shipment, and opening after receipt in order to provide access to the coiled material. Particularly is this the case when coils of appreciable size, having a diameter on the order of fifteen inches or so, are involved.

According to the present invention an extremely simple container structure has been devised, readily formable from a single sheet or blank of suitable material such as corrugated paperboard or the like, which satisfies all of the above factors in an eminently satisfactory manner. It may be stored in flat single-ply condition, it involves no parts other than the single sheet of material from which it is formed, it may be readily be erected, filled and sealed, and it may be employed as a dispensing container without destruction or damage and without impairing its protective character except to a minimal degree. In addition, means are provided by which the contents of the device when used as a dispensing receptacle may readily visually be checked, again without materially detracting from the protective character of the container.

To these ends, and to such other objects as may hereinafter appear, the present invention relates to a structure suitable foruse as a combined shipping container and dispensing receptacle, particularly in conjunction with the coiled commodities as defined in the appended claims and as described in this specification, taken together with the accompanying drawings, in which:

Fig. 1 is a top plan view of the blank from which the container is adapted to be formed;

Fig. 2 is a top plan view of the erected structure formed from the blank of Fig. 1, showing it in condition for use as a dispensing receptacle and when dispensing of the contents of the containerhas just begun;

Fig. 3 is a bottom plan view of the erected container of Fig. 2, but on a reducedscale; and

Fig. 4 is a fragmentary top plan view of the container of Fig. 2 after an appreciable quantity of coiled material has been removed therefrom, and illustrating the manner in which the amount of coiled material remaining therein is rendered visible.

Having reference first to Fig. 1, which discloses the blank from which the combined shipping container and dispensing receptacle of the present invention may be formed, that blank is defined by a single sheet of suitable structural material, such as corrugated paperboard or the like. It includes side wall panels 2, 4, 6, 8, 10 and 12, each connected to adjacent side wall panels by means of foldlines 14, the extreme side wall panel =12 having a securing flap 16 secured thereto by means of foldline 18. Bottom cover flaps 20, 22, 24, 26, 28 and 36 are secured to the lower ends of the side wall panels 2-12 respectively by means of foldlines 32, each of the flaps 2ll-3il being separated from adjacent flaps by means of cuts 34. The length of each of the bottom covering flaps 20-30 is here shown as being somewhat greater than half the width of the erected container, that is to say, somewhat greater than half the distance from one side wall panel 2-12 to that side wall panel oppositely disposed with respect thereto in the erected container.

Secured to the upper ends of the side Wall panels 4 and 10 by means of foldlines 36 are top cover flaps 3S and 40 respectively, the side wall panels 4 and being disposed opposite one another when the container is erected and the flaps 38 and 40 each having a length appreciably greater than half the width of the container, that is to say, appreciably greater than half the distance between the side wall panels 4 and 10 when the container is erected. Hence the ends of the flaps 38 and 40 are adapted to overlap, those overlapping flap portions being designated 38' and 40'. Score lines 42 and 44 respectively are provided in the flap portions 38 and 40', those score lines being here shown as circular and circumscribing areas 45 and 4S respectively adapted to register in whole or in part when the flap portions 38 or 49 overlap one another. One of the flaps 3S and 40, here shown as the flap 38, is provided with a series of additional circular score lines 5i encompassing areas 52 54 and 56 respectively, those areas being disposed in a line between the area 46 and the foldline 36.

Foldably secured to the upper ends of the side wall panels 2, 6, 8 and 12 respectively by means of foldlines 53 are top cover flaps as, 62., 64 and 66, all of the top cover flaps 33, 4!. and 6056 being separated from adjacent flaps by means of cuts 68. The length of the flaps 6ll66 is less than half the width of the erected container, and in the form here specifically disclosed, the corners of the flaps 6i and 62 adjacent the flap 38 are angled or beveled at 7% and 72 respectively for a purpose hereinafter to be explained.

The first step in erecting the container is to fold the side wall panels 212 about the foldlines 14 until the flap 16 overlaps the panel 2, the flap 16 being secured in place by means of staples 74. This defines a tubular six-sided structure open at top and bottom and capable of assuming an infinite variety of shapes. The bottom cover flaps 20-30 are then folded about their foldlines 32 so as to be substantially perpendicular to their respective side wall panels 2-42, the fiaps 29-39 overlapping one another as shown in Fig. 3 so as to completely cover the bottom of the container. A pair of end wall flaps secured to opposite side wall panels, here shown as the flaps 22 and 28 secured respectively to the side wall panels 4 and 1'9, are positioned below the other bottom cover flaps and overlap one another to that degree necessary to give the container its desired peripheral shape, usually that of a regular polygon. The flaps 22 and 28 are then secured together by staples 7s. This simple operation rigidifies the container and holds it in position for receiving the coil 78 of rope or other material which the container is adapted to hold.

After the coil 78 has been placed within the container, the top cover flaps 6G, 62, 64 and 56 are then folded down perpendicular to their respective side wall panels. At will be apparent from Fig. 2, these cover flaps 61B, 62, 64 and 66, because of their abbreviated length, not only do not completely cover the open top of the container adjacent certain of the peripheral edges thereof but also leave a substantially 'large opening at the center of the container, as defined by the intersecting lines 80, S2, 84 and 86 shown in broken lines in Fig. 2 and representing the edges of the top cover flaps in question. This opening, it will be seen, is substantially diamond-shaped and is open at its lower end as viewed in Fig. 2 by reason of the beveled corners 7t and '72 of the flaps 50 and 62 respectively.

Next the flaps 38 and 40' are bent down over the top of the container, their portions 38 and 4% overlapping, those overlapping portions being secured together by means of staples 88. The flaps 38 and 40 complete the covering of the top of the container, the areas as and 48 thereof defined by the score lines 42 and 44 being in registration with one another and over the triangular shaped opening defined by the lines 80-86, the areas 52* 56 defined by the score lines 50 being over portions of the top of the container not covered by any flap other than the flap 38. Since the areas 46, 48 and 52-56 are all part of the flaps 38 and 49, it will be appreciated that the structure of the present invention in the condition just described is completely closed top and bottom, thus sub stantially sealing the contents of the container from adverse external influences.. The multiplicity of cover flaps at the top and bottom of the container cooperate to provide appreciable strength even though both the top and bottom sets of cover flaps are each held in place only by a pair of staples 88 and 7s respectively. The multiplicity of flaps further provides a very tortuous path for any substances which might tend to enter the container, thus providing a maxim-um of protection to the contents thereof consistent with the simplicity of the structure.

After the shipping container has-arrived at its point of use access to the coil 78 therein may readily be had by excising or punching the registering areas 45 and 48 from the flaps 38 and 4% respectively, thus producing a central aperture )6 through the overlapping flap portions 38 and 46, the end 2 of the coil 78 being pulled through the aperture 9% so that the material of the coil 73 may be drawn out from the container whenever and to whatever extent is desired. Since the aperture 91) is only of limited extent, and since the bulk of the coil 78 is still covered and protected by the container, this arrangement is entirely satisfactory.

As the material of the coil 78 is Withdrawn from the container the inner diameter of the material remaining in the container will increase until it exceeds the diameter of the opening t Thereafter it is not particularly convenient to view the coil 73 and determine how much coiled material remains within the container. it is here that the areas 52, 54 and 56 play their part. When the coil 78 has disappeared from view through the aperture 96, the area 52 may be excised or punched out from theflap 38, the score line 5%} facilitating this action, thus rendering the coil 78 visible through the aperture 94 in the flap 38 formed thereby. This procedure is repeated with the areas 54 and 56 of the flap 33, and when the inner surface of the coil '78 is rendered visible through the space left by excising or punching out the area 56, the user of the material knows that it is time to reorder. Consequently, as shown in Fig. 2, the area 52 may carry the numeral 1, the area 54 may carry the numeral 2, and the area 56 may have printed thereon Time to Reorder.

it should be noted that during all the time that the structure of the present invention is being used as a dispensing receptacle, its top and bottom cover fiaps remain secured in container-closing position, thus providing a maximum of security to the contents of the container both insofar as remaining within the container is concerned and with respect to protection against dust, dirt, moisture and the like. The modification of the structure from its function as a shipping container to its function as a dispensing receptacle is readily accomplished, and provides only for a minimal reduction in the protection afforded to the contents. The entire structure is simple in the extreme, but despite that simplicity is eminently adapted for its dual function as above described.

While but asingle embodiment of the present invention has been here disclosed, it will be apparent that many variations may be made in the details thereof without departing from the spirit of the invention as defined in the following claims.

I claim:

1. A combined shipping container and dispensing receptacle comprising a plurality of side walls, means connected to said side Walls for covering the bottom of said container, and flaps secured to the upper edges of said side Walls and extending substantially perpendicular thereto, two opposing flaps having lengths greater than half the distance between the side Walls to which they are respectively attached so as to overlap one another when folded perpendicular to their respective side walls,

said last mentioned flaps having scorelines in their portions adapted to overlap which circumscribe areas adapted to be punched out from said flaps, said flaps being adapted to be secured together in overlapping condition with their respective punch-out areas at least partially in registration, the other flaps closing the remainder of the top of said container, when folded perpendicular to their respective side walls, adapted to be positioned under and in engagement with said two opposing flaps, and having size and shape such as, when thus folded, to leave open the space beneath the registering portions of said punch-out areas, said flaps collectively defining a flat cover completely closing the top of said container.

2. A combined shipping container and dispensing receptacle comprising a plurality of side walls, a first set of flaps secured to the lower edges of said side walls, adapted to be bent substantially perpendicular to said side walls, and having lengths such as when thus bent, to overlap one another and cover the bottom of said container, the outermost of said flaps being adapted to be secured to a flap overlapped thereby, and a second set of flaps secured to the upper edges of said side walls and extending substantially perpendicular thereto, two opposing flaps of said second set having lengths greater than half the distance between the side walls to which they are respectively attached so as, when folded perpendicular to their respective side walls, to overlap one another, said last-mentioned flaps having score lines in their portions adapted to overlap which circumscribe areas adapted to be punched out from said fiaps, said flaps being adapted to be secured together in overlapping condition with their respective punch-out areas at least partially in registration, the other flaps of said second set closing the remainder of the top of said container when folded perpendicular to their respective side walls, adapted to be positioned under and in engagement with said two opposing flaps, and having size and shape such as, when thus folded to leave open the space beneath walls, a first set of flaps foldably secured to the lower edges of said side walls, having a length greater than half the width of said container and adapted to be bent substantially perpendicular to their respective side walls so as to overlap one another and collectively cover the bottom of said container, one pair of overlapping flaps secured to opposing side walls being adapted to be outermost and secured to one another at their overlapped portions, and a second set of flaps foldably secured to the upper edges of said side walls and adapted to be bent substantially perpendicular to their respective side walls, one pair of said second set of flaps secured to opposing side walls each having a length greater than half the width of said container, the others of said second set of flaps having a length less than half the width of said container but sufiicient so that, collectively with said first mentioned pair of flaps, they will, when bent perpendicular to their respective side walls, cover the top of said container, said first mentioned pair of flaps being adapted to be outermost, to overlap one another, and to be secured to one another at their overlapping portions, said overlapping portions having at least partially registering areas defined by score lines and adapted to be punched out from said flaps when access to the contents of said container is desired, the space beneath the registering portions of said punch-out areas being unobstructed by the other flaps of said second set of flaps, all of said flaps of said second set being secured together to define a flat cover completely closing the top of said container.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,431,352 Abbott Oct. 10, 1922 1,707,619 King -1 Apr. 2, 1929 1,915,843 Wright June 27, 1933 1,936,227 Cook Nov. 21, 1933 1,974,862 Cryan Sept. 25, 1934 2,471,173 Taylor May 24, 1949 2,674,400 Ross Apr. 6, 1954 2,713,938 Snyder July 26, 1955 FOREIGN PATENTS 404,114 Great Britain I an. 11, 1934

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1431352 *Jan 26, 1921Oct 10, 1922American Wiremold CompanyCarton for flexible conduits
US1707619 *Mar 4, 1927Apr 2, 1929Samson Cordage WorksTwine package
US1915843 *Jan 27, 1932Jun 27, 1933Wrights Ropes LtdCover, envelope, or container for balls or cops of twine and the like
US1936227 *Jan 8, 1932Nov 21, 1933C And W Wire Container CompanyWire container
US1974862 *Apr 10, 1933Sep 25, 1934Cryan JosephThread package
US2471173 *Jul 27, 1945May 24, 1949Sears Roebuck & CoFiberboard container for diskshaped articles
US2674400 *Jan 3, 1950Apr 6, 1954Behr Manning CorpShipping carton
US2713938 *Apr 26, 1950Jul 26, 1955New Bedford Cordage CompanyRope package
GB404114A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3512634 *Sep 26, 1968May 19, 1970Wellington Puritan Mills IncCord dispensing and display package
US4006854 *Nov 26, 1975Feb 8, 1977International Paper CompanyWire dispenser container
US4373687 *Apr 1, 1981Feb 15, 1983Container Corporation Of AmericaDispensing container
US4382510 *Oct 19, 1981May 10, 1983Gafcel Industries, Inc.Roll dispensing container
US6016911 *Feb 19, 1999Jan 25, 2000Chen; Hua-MeiPackage for a reel of wire
US6648141Sep 4, 2001Nov 18, 2003Lincoln Global, Inc.Packaging for containing and dispensing large quantities of wire
US6889835Oct 8, 2003May 10, 2005Lincoln Global, Inc.Packaging for containing and dispensing large quantities of wire
US6913145Apr 15, 2003Jul 5, 2005Lincoln Global, Inc.Welding wire container with ribbed walls and a mating retainer ring
US7026574Jul 22, 2003Apr 11, 2006Lincoln Global, Inc.Wire gripper for a drive unit of a wire feeder
US7152735 *Jul 15, 2002Dec 26, 2006Illinois Tool Works Inc.Cover for a recyclable container
US7185842Jun 30, 2004Mar 6, 2007Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.Dispenser for rolled sheet material
US7198152Apr 4, 2005Apr 3, 2007Lincoln Global, Inc.Welding wire container with ribbed walls and mating retainer ring
US7222734Jul 15, 2004May 29, 2007Lincoln Global, Inc.Welding wire package with lifting strap
US7275708Jun 30, 2004Oct 2, 2007Richard Paul LewisDispenser for rolled sheet material
US7331457Jan 27, 2005Feb 19, 2008C.I.F.E. S.R.L.Cardboard box for containing and dispensing large quantities of wire
US7377388Nov 15, 2004May 27, 2008Lincoln Global, Inc.Welding wire package
US7687742Jan 10, 2007Mar 30, 2010Lincoln Global, Inc.Wire gripper for a drive unit of a wire feeder
US7692117Feb 21, 2006Apr 6, 2010Lincoln Global, Inc.Wire gripper for a drive unit of a wire feeder
US7748530Feb 13, 2008Jul 6, 2010Lincoln Global, Inc.Welding wire package
US7938352Mar 10, 2009May 10, 2011Lincoln Global, Inc.Wire dispensing apparatus for packaged wire
US7958996May 4, 2010Jun 14, 2011Lincoln Global, Inc.Welding wire package
US8235211Nov 1, 2010Aug 7, 2012Sidergas SpaRetainer for welding wire container, having fingers and half-moon shaped holding tabs
US8389901May 27, 2010Mar 5, 2013Awds Technologies SrlWelding wire guiding liner
US8393467Aug 21, 2009Mar 12, 2013Sidergas SpaRetainer for welding wire container, having fingers and half-moon shaped holding tabs
US8453960Feb 24, 2009Jun 4, 2013Awds Technologies SrlWire guiding system
US8550245Dec 4, 2006Oct 8, 2013Hobart Brothers CompanyCover for a recyclable container
US8668086Oct 2, 2009Mar 11, 2014Sidergas SpaCover for welding wire container
US8674263Jul 20, 2009Mar 18, 2014Awds Technologies SrlWire guiding liner, in particular a welding wire liner, with biasing means between articulated guiding bodies
US8794561Sep 15, 2010Aug 5, 2014Lincoln Global, Inc.Wire dispensing apparatus for packaged wire
US20120234713 *Jun 1, 2012Sep 20, 2012Lincoln Global, Inc.Box for welding wire
US20130153705 *Dec 19, 2011Jun 20, 2013Carlo GelmettiRetainer for welding wire container and welding wire container with retainer
USRE43352Jul 11, 2007May 8, 2012Lincoln Global, Inc.Mechanism for braking the unwinding of a bundle of metallic wire housed in a drum
Classifications
U.S. Classification206/409, 206/395
International ClassificationB65D85/04, B65D85/02
Cooperative ClassificationB65D85/04
European ClassificationB65D85/04