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Publication numberUS2975296 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 14, 1961
Filing dateMay 11, 1959
Priority dateMay 11, 1959
Publication numberUS 2975296 A, US 2975296A, US-A-2975296, US2975296 A, US2975296A
InventorsDominguez-Rego Jose
Original AssigneeDominguez-Rego Jose
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Circuit clock control for starting motors
US 2975296 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

M rch 14, 1 J. DOMlNGUEZ-REGO 2,975,296

CIRCUIT CLOCK CONTROL FOR STARTING MOTORS Filed May 11, 1959 M h w EEEQ l N a F B moimwzmo m on on /w 55% N T m 3 mm 3p m? m A 3 9 A o F EEMEE 5 mm L zoEzQ mm 2 3: .d SN 2 l k ow mm 8 E 2 mm T m8 :3? .5 555m 2 2 mm 6 N3 E 29258: gL 552E mm mm 5 & mm \m Ln 3 3 ON madame me a: N mi! -w mm v mm mm mm I 5.5%: n 3 3 M T m SE55 mohawwima JOSE DOMINGUEZ- REGO INVENTOR United States Patent CIRCUIT CLOCK CONTROL FOR STARTING MoToRs Ios Dominguez-Rego, 80 Pearl St., Paterson, NJ.

Filed May 11, 1959, Ser. No. 812,336

2 Claims. (Cl. 290-37) This invention is a device for automatically and effec- {)ively starting a motor vehicle, particularly an automoile.

An object of the invention is to provide a new, simple and effective device for automatically starting a motor vehicle at a predetermined time and energize the heater, thus enabling the operator to enter a warm car and find its engine warm.

Another object of the invention is to provide an automatic device for energizing the ignition circuit, the starter, the heater, and for controlling the throttle opening during the starting and warming up periods; for deenergizing the starter once the engine has started, and for idling the engine once it has warmed up; for restartlllg the engine if it stalls while warming up or while idling, and for deenergizing the automatic device itself if the engine fails to start after a reasonable time.

The accompanying drawing is a schematic circuit diagram of an arrangement which embodies my invention.

Referring to the drawing, 3 denotes a manually operated switch which for practical purposes can be included within the ignition switch located in the dashboard. Said switch 3 is provided to enable the operator to turn off the automatic device once he turns the ignition switch on. Therefore, said switch is normally on when the ignition switch is turned off.

Designated at 5 is an automatic clock similar to those used on automatic radios. Said clock 5 is provided to enable the operator to set it for a predetermined time, at which said predetermined time said clock closes an internal switch 6 which turns the automatic device on.

Designated at 8 is a safety switch provided to prevent the automatic device from starting the engine if the car is not left in neutral. Said switch is installed in the gearshift and is normally closed when the gearshift is left in neutral and open when the gearshift is left in gear. Moreover, said switch will prevent the car from being driven away without first turning on the ignition switch while the engine is under the control of the automatic device, since the act of moving the gearshift away from neutral will deenergize the automatic device, whereby the engine is shut off.

Designated at 10 and 62 are two Amperites. Said devices are commercially produced, thermally controlled switches designed to open or close a circuit after their heater elements have been energized for a certain length of time. As used with the automatic device, they are normally closed.

When clock 5 closes its internal switch 6, and assuming that the car had been left in neutral and the ignition switch turned off, ignition relay 14, starter relay 21, throttle mechanism 31, and heater element 46 of thermally controlled switch 10 are energized.

Ignition relay 14 becomes energized by a circuit comprising the ungrounded terminal of battery 1, wire 2, switch 3, wire 4, switch 6, wire 7, switch 8, wire 9, switch 11, wire 12, and a wire 13 connected to one ter- "ice minal of ignition relay 14 and wire 15 connecting the other terminal of the ignition relay to ground.

The ignition relay is provided with a stationary contact 16 and a movable contact 17 which engages the stationary contact 16 when the ignition relay is energized. Contact 17 is connected by a wire 18 to the ungrounded terminal of battery 1; contact 16 is connected by a wire 19 to ignition coil 20.

Starter relay 21 is energized by a circuit comprising the ungrounded terminal of battery 1, wire 2, switch 3, wire 4, switch 6, wire 7, switch 8, wire 9, switch 11, and a wire 12 connected to one terminal of starter relay 21 and a wire 22, contact 23, contact 24, and wire 25 connecting the other terminal of the starter relay to ground.

The starter relay is provided with a stationary contact 26 and a movable contact 27 which engages stationary contact 26 when the starter relay becomes energized. Contact 27 is connected by a wire 28 to starter 29. Contact 26 is connected by a wire 30 to the unground terminal of battery 1. Starer 29 is normally grounded.

Throttle mechanism 31, which consists of a coil 32 wound about a magnetic core and a movable arm 33 which rotates about a point 34, said movable arm 33 being attached to a rod 35 which is in turn connected to the gasoline, or fuel, control valve, becomes energized by a circuit comprised of the ungrounded terminal of battery 1, wire 2, switch 3, wire 4, switch 6, wire '7, switch 8, wire 9, switch 11, wire 12, wire 36, wire 37, rheostat 38, Wire 39, contact 40, contact 41, and a wire 42 connected to one terminal of coil 32 and wire 43, switch 44, and wire 45 connecting the other terminal of coil 32 to ground.

Movable arm 33 of the throttle mechanism deflects proportionately to the current existing in coil 32, said current being adjusted by varying the resistance in rheostat 38, thereby enabling the operator to set the throttle to the optimum position for efiiciently starting the engine.

Heater element 46 of thermally actuated switch 10 becomes enerized by a circuit comprising the ungrounded terminal of battery 1, wire 2, switch 3, wire 4, switch 6, wire 7, switch 8, wire 9, and a wire 47 connected to one terminal of heater element 46 and Wire 48, wire 22, contact 23, contact 24, and a wire 25 connecting the other terminal of heater element 46 to ground.

If the engine fails to start within a designed time after clock 5 closes its internal switch 6, the thermal action of device 10 opens switch 11, thereby deenergizing the automatic device. The designed time can be specified by the operator himself as thermally actuated switches are available commercially for several time lapses.

Once the engine starts, the generator begins to generate a current. Said current energizes control relay 49 by a circuit comprising wire 50, which connects to the armature winding of generator 51, switch 52, and a wire 53 connected to one terminal of control relay 49 and wire 54 connecting the other terminal of the control relay to ground. Generator 51 is normally connected to ground.

Switch 52 is a manually operated switch which for practical purposes can be included within the ignition switch in the dashboard. Said switch 52 is provided to enable the operator to disconnect the control relay from the generator when he turns the ignition switch on. It is normally on when the ignition switch is turned off.

Control relay 49 consists of movable contacts 24, 41, and 55 and stationary contacts 23, 4t), 56, and 57. When the control relay is energized, the following actions hap' pen simultaneously:

(1) Contact 24 disengages contact 23, whereby deenergizing heater element 46 of thermally actuated switch 10 and starter relay 21, which in turn deenergizes the starter by releasing contact 27 from 26.

(2) Contact 41 disengages contact 40 and engages contact 56, whereby coil 32 of throttle mechanism 31 becomes energized by a circuit comprising the ungrounded terminal of battery 1, wire 2, switch 3, wire 4, switch 6, Wire 7, switch 8, wire 9, switch 11, wire 12, wire 36, wire 58, rheostat 59, wire 60, contact 56, contact 41, and wire 42 connected to one terminal of coil 32 and wire 43, switch 44, and wire 25 connecting the other terminal of coil 32 to ground.

Rheostat 59 is a device provided to enable the operator to adjust the current existing in coil 32 to give a throttle setting for engine warm up which is lower than that used for starting, but higher than that used for idling.

(3) Contact 55 engages contact 57, whereby heater element 61 of thermally actuated device 62 becomes energized by a circuit comprising the ungrounded terminal of battery 1, wire 63, contact 57, contact 55, wire 64, and a wire 65 connected to one terminal of heater element 61 and wire 66 and wire 45 connecting the other terminal of heater element 61 to ground. Heater 67 be comes energized by a circuit comprising the ungrounded terminal of battery 1, wire 63, contact 57, cont-act 55, and a wire 64 connected to the ungrounded terminal of heater 67 which is normally connected to ground.

When the designed time lapse has elapsed during which the engine has been running at the warm up speed, the thermal action of thermally actuated device 62 will open switch 44 of said thermally actuated device whereby deenergizing the throttle mechanism and changing the engine speed to idle. As heater element 61 remains energized, the engine will now idle until the operator arrives and turns on the ignition switch. The time lapse can be set by the operator as is done with thermally actuated device 10.

I claim:

1. An automatic engine starting device for starting an internal combustion engine which includes a starter motor, a generator, a fuel control valves, and a source of current and comprising; an adjustable clock switch which includes a pair of contacts, a starter relay which includes a relay Winding and a pair of normally open relay contacts, a control relay which includes a relay winding and a pair of normally closed relay contacts, means connecting the said starter relay winding across the said current source through the said clock switch contacts and control relay contacts in series for energizaticn of the said starter relay upon closure of the said series connected contacts, circuit means connecting the said control relay winding across the said generator to open the said control relay contacts when the said generator produces a predetermined output upon starting of the engine, a throttle mechanism comprising a winding and a magnetic core movable upon energization of the said winding, means coupling the said control valve to the said magnetic core for actuation of the said valve upon energization of the said throttle mechanism winding, first and second rhe0- stats, and means connecting the said throttle mechanism winding across the said current source through the said clock switch contacts, the last-mentioned means including means controlled by the said control relay for connecting the said throttle mechanism winding across the said current source through the said first r'ncostat when the control relay is energized and through the said second rheostat when the control relay is deenergized.

2. The invention as recited in claim 1 wherein the said engine starting device includes a thermally actuated switch having a pair of normally closed switch contacts in series circuit with the throttle control winding and a heater element connected across the said current source through a pair of normally open switch contacts controlled by the said control relay winding, the said thermally actuated switch contacts opening at a predetei mined temperature in response to the heat from the heater element thereof to thereby deenergize the throttle mechanism.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,144,786 Baer et al Jan, 24, 1939 2,485,727 Gallina Oct. 25, 1949 2,502,580 McMillan Apr. 4, 1950 r 2,579,958 Perhats Dec. 25, 1951 2,606,298 Merritt Aug 5, 1952 2,650,987 Doyle Sept. l, 1953 2,691,110 Lincoln Oct. 5, 1954 2,698,391 Braden et al Dec. 28, 1954 2,707,463 Booth May 3, 1955 2,748,759 Schifier Fune 5, 1956 2,817,022 Comer et a1. Dec. 17, 1957 2,836,732 Newlin May 27, 1958

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2144786 *Jun 12, 1936Jan 24, 1939Cutler Hammer IncStarting system for internal combustion engines
US2485727 *Mar 7, 1945Oct 25, 1949Harold GallinaProtective device for automotive electric circuit
US2502580 *Jun 16, 1945Apr 4, 1950Mcmillan Sherman AElectrical circuits for motor vehicles
US2579958 *May 20, 1950Dec 25, 1951Francis J PerhatsAutomatic starting system for internal-combustion engines
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US2817022 *Apr 16, 1956Dec 17, 1957Billhimer Emil AAutomatic starting device
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3102961 *Nov 4, 1960Sep 3, 1963Systematics IncEngine starter and temperature control apparatus for automotive vehicles
US3151249 *Jun 2, 1960Sep 29, 1964Earl J IvesAutomatic engine starting and stopping apparatus
US3220397 *Feb 3, 1964Nov 30, 1965Ramon C FennerAutomatic starting system for engines
US3259753 *Jan 24, 1964Jul 5, 1966Wayne T McwhirterAutomatic engine starter
US3264484 *Jun 26, 1964Aug 2, 1966Garbe Lahmeyer & Co AgStarter control including means to prevent starter energization while engine is running
US3275836 *Mar 26, 1964Sep 27, 1966Frederick A MichaelsAutomatic engine starter
US3308305 *Aug 25, 1964Mar 7, 1967Electronic Dev Mfg CorpAutomatic starter for prime movers
US3367446 *Oct 5, 1964Feb 6, 1968Higgs Electrical & MechanicalMotor vehicle incorporating an improved lubrication system
US3443112 *Dec 9, 1965May 6, 1969Gen Motors CorpElectric cranking motor automatic disconnect circuit
US3443557 *Mar 8, 1967May 13, 1969Rene HebertAutomatic starting device for internal combustion engines
US3562542 *Aug 15, 1969Feb 9, 1971Frank A RedmondAutomatic starting system for internal combustion engines including throttle control means
US3603802 *Jul 24, 1969Sep 7, 1971Frank PetricRemote control automobile motor starter
US3653699 *Jul 22, 1970Apr 4, 1972Charles R Miles JrAutomatic engine starter system including means for releasing the fast idle cam
US3740564 *May 3, 1971Jun 19, 1973G WongAutomatic starting device for automotive engines and the like
US4131304 *May 9, 1977Dec 26, 1978Wagner Richard JAutomatic starter for vehicle
US4200080 *Jul 14, 1978Apr 29, 1980Cook Norman EAutomatic starting system
US4606307 *Dec 1, 1983Aug 19, 1986Cook Norman EAutomatic starting system
US4637359 *Mar 4, 1985Jan 20, 1987Cook Norman EElectronic detection device for motorized vehicles
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US5081667 *Mar 20, 1990Jan 14, 1992Clifford Electronics, Inc.System for integrating a cellular telephone with a vehicle security system
US5444444 *Sep 16, 1994Aug 22, 1995Worldwide Notification Systems, Inc.Apparatus and method of notifying a recipient of an unscheduled delivery
US5714948 *Apr 16, 1996Feb 3, 1998Worldwide Notifications Systems, Inc.Satellite based aircraft traffic control system
US6314366Aug 16, 1994Nov 6, 2001Tom S. FarmakisSatellite based collision avoidance system
US6351703Jun 6, 2000Feb 26, 2002Detroit Diesel CorporationEngine control with programmable automatic starting
US6683436 *Jul 19, 2001Jan 27, 2004Honda Giken Kogyo Kabushiki KaishaSelf-starting motor control device and method for engine
US6860248Nov 1, 2002Mar 1, 2005Engjell MeneProgrammable vehicle starting device
Classifications
U.S. Classification290/37.00A, 290/38.00R, 123/179.3, 290/2
International ClassificationG05B19/02
Cooperative ClassificationG05B19/02
European ClassificationG05B19/02