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Publication numberUS2976817 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 28, 1961
Filing dateNov 20, 1956
Priority dateNov 20, 1956
Publication numberUS 2976817 A, US 2976817A, US-A-2976817, US2976817 A, US2976817A
InventorsEdwin Stapp Henry
Original AssigneeEdwin Stapp Henry
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Mechanism for switching, classifying and segregating railroad cars
US 2976817 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

March 28, 1961 H. E. sTAPP MECHANISM RoR SWITCHING, CLAssIFYING AND SEGREGATING RAILROAD CARS 3 Sheets-Sheet l.

Filed NOV. 20, 1956 MLU pci

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HAN@ 2 A M. YE 2 JIT l u n =HI|L-= j D B D C D 4 4 M 4 o f M 5 a 4 d d.. 2 e fr I C y. ...w1 ./A 4l- March 28, 1961 H. E. sTAPP 2,976,817

MECHANrsM FOR SWITCHING. CLASSIFYING AND SEGREGATING RAILROAD CARS 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Nov. 20, 1956 INVENTOR. A65-wey 52W/N App E. STAPP TCHING. CLASSIFYING AND SEGREGATING RAILROAD CARS 3 Sheets-Sheet 3 Filed NOV. 20, 1956 :l A' INVENTOR.

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Unite MECHANISM FOR SWITCHING, CLASSIFYING AND SEGREGATING RAILROAD CARS This invention relates to a yard switching mechanism between parallel tracks and facilitating the making up of a freight-carrying train by switching, classifying and segregating certain cars and regrouping the same so as to compose another train with cars of the same classification grouped together in the new make-up train,

One object of the invention is to provide a mechanism whereby any desired number of selected cars may be moved transversely from a train of cars on one track to another track, quickly, conveniently and Without first moving any of the other cars in the train. Another object of the invention is to provide a mechanism which will perform the switching, classifying and segregating of trains of cars now performed in flat or hump yard operations. This mechanism will require a much smaller area, less trackage, and fewer switches and frogs. It will eliminate the necessity of the usual hump track, the classification tracks and the receiving and departure tracks by combining all of these into one compact unit. Greater safety will be afforded to switchmen who now ride moving trains and pull coupler pins in liat yard switching, by eliminating these activities. Damage to equipment and cargo will be decreased because this mechanism will eliminate excessive jarring caused by coupling of cars at excessive speeds in fiat or hump yard switching. The mechanism also will effect economies in the construction, operation and maintenance of railroad switching yards.

For the attainment of these and other objectsv as may appear or be pointed out, I have shown an embodiment of my invention in the accompanying drawings, wherein:

Fig. 1 shows the mechanism which consists of two series of short sections of disconnected railroad tracks, each section being separated from the next by a pit, with a series of transfer tables interspaced in between these short sections of track, each transfer table operating in a pit, so that the short sections of track and the interspaced transfer tables form two long, through railroad tracks. There is a transfer table for each car of the train, and each car is spotted on a transfer table, and all cars are lined up for the first track.

Fig. 2 is similar to Fig. l, except that all of the transfer tables on which cars were spotted having as destination point A have been moved to the right so that these cars now are lined up for the second track.

Fig. 3 is similar to Figs. 1 and 2, except that all of the transfer tables on which cars were spotted having as destination point B have been moved to the right so that these cars now are lined up for the second track.

Fig. 4 is similar to Figs. 1, 2, and 3, except that all of the transfer tables on which cars were spotted having as destination point C have been moved to the right so that these cars now are lined up for the second track.

Fig. 5 is the top plan of one of the transfer tables.

Fig. 6 is an end elevation of one of the transfer tables.

Fig. 7 is a side elevation of one of the transfer tables.

Fig. 8 is a diagrammatic end elevation showing the location of a bumper and a latch for holding the trans- States Patent fer table in one position. The latch is in locked position.

Fig. 9 is a diagrammatic end elevation showing the location of a bumper and the latch in released position.

In the operation of this mechanism, a train of railroad cars is drawn up on the continuous railroad track formed by each transfer table 8 and the series of short sections of disconnected railroad track 1. Each transfer table 8 has three parallel railroad tracks 5, 6 and 7 on its surface. Each railroad car 14 is spotted onA the center track of its transfer table.

All cars in the train which are destined for point 'A are uncoupled and then transferred laterally to track 2 by operating the particular transfer tables on which these particular cars are spotted. Conventionally, railroad cars employ some types of coupling capable of allowing the cars to be moved laterally after the coupling members are disengaged, and my invention contemplates use of such a type of coupling. The transfer tables are operated by remote control (not shown) by an operator in a control tower or other vantage point, that is, one from which he can see all parts. This operation creates a continuous track formed of the short series of disconnected tracks 2, track 7 of each transfer table which has not been moved, and track 6 of each transfer table which has been moved. This is shown in Fig. 2. The railroad cars destined for A are then moved together on continuous track 2.

Similarly, the cars destined for point B are moved `as shown in Fig. 3 and those destined for point C are moved as shown in Fig. 4. Any number of additional classifications or switchings of cars can be made by the same method of procedure using the mechanism herein described.

Referring to the drawings in Figs. 5, 6 and 7, the number 3 represents the walls of the pit 4 in which the transfer table is operated. The three parallel railroad tracks 5, 6 and 7, on the transfer table 8, are supported on I-beams 9 some running lengthwise and others at right angles to the tracks, which in turn are supported on the wheels 10 on which the transfer table moves. The i-beams are braced and held in position by steel channels 20. The wheels 10 run on rails 11 which are laid along the bottom of the transfer pit 4 on longitudinal concrete stringers 12. Two motors 13 operate the tables transversely from one side of the transfer pit 4 to the other. Each railroad car 14 is moved by the transfer table on which is Iis spotted. As the transfer tables are moved from one track to the other and back it is necessary to hold themin position for each particular switching operation. For this purpose four latches 15 are provided. Fig. 8 shows the latch 15 yin closed position holding against the shoulder 16 on the end of the l-beam 9. The l-beam 9 is butted up against the bumper 18 which is provided with a coil spring 19 to reduce the shock of the transfer table com-ing to a stop at either side of the transfer pit 4. Whenl the latch 15 is unlatched or in raised position it is held there by a magnet 17. When the magnet is released the latch falls over the shoulder 16 on the end of the l-beam to lock the transfer table in place at that side of the pit.

l claim as my invention and desire to secure by Letters Patent:

l. In a yard switching apparatus for making up a second train from a first train composed of freight cars carrying billing cards on their sides respectively designating them indiscriminately to different destinations, the combination of a receiving track comprising two permanent track ends with a gap between the same, said gap having a width measured longitudinally of the receiving track equal to a plurality of car lengths, a delivery track parallel to the receiving track, and having permanent track ends alongside the first-named track ends and approximately parallel to the same, said lastnamed permanent track-ends having a gap between the same equafl in width to the rst-named gap; a plurality of laterally shiftable transfer tables alongside of each other so that their total Width fills the said gaps between the permanent track-ends; track rail sections `laid upon the said tables of the same gauge as the permanent track-ends; means for holding the transfer tables in a fixed position with a pair of the track rail sections on said transfer tables in longitudinal alinement with the rails of the permanent track-ends of the receiving track; each of said transfer tables also having va second pair of track rails laid so that the same will aline longitudinally with the pair of track rails of the permanent track-ends of the delivery track when the first-named track rails -on the transfer tables are in alinement with the rails on the permanent track-ends of the receiving track; means for guiding said transfer tables in a lateral direction with respect to longitudinal axes of said permanent track-ends, and power developing means operatively connected with said transfer tables for shifting the transfer tables independently of each other to transfer a car on the rail sections that are alining with the track rails of the receiving track and aline the some with the corresponding permanent trackends of the delivery track; and means for holding'any transfer table fixed in its new position of alinement of its rail sections with the track-ends of the delivery track.

2. A yard switching apparatus for making up a second train from a rst train composed of freight cars carrying billing cards on their sides respectively desigmating them indiscriminately to different destinations, according to claim l, inwhich each transfer table carries alining pairs of supplementary rail sections spaced from the receiving track rail sections an amount equal to the distance between the permanent track-ends of the receiving track and the delivery track, so that after the said shifting movement is accomplished the supplementary rail sections will aline with the rails of the said permanent track-ends, thereby bridging the space between the permanent track-ends of the receiving track.

3. A yard switching apparatus for making up a second train from a first train composed of freight cars billed indiscriminately to different destinations, according to claim 1, including permanent abutment walls to limit the travel of the transfer tables, and means carried by the walls and the transfer tables -for cushioning the stopping of the tables at the limits of its travel.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 912,005 Lehman et al. Feb. 9, 1909 1,201,206 Lewis Oct. 10, 1916 1,366,292 Smith Jan. 18, 1921 1,550,754 Sockman Aug. 25, -1925 1,939,637 Wheeler Dec. l2, 1933 2,190,073 Knudsen Feb. 13, 1940 2,277,710 `Mertzanoff et al Mar. 31, 1942 2,526,819 Henderson Oct. 24, 1950 2,626,718 Weber Jan. 17, 1953 2,717,087 Auger Sept. 6, 1955

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US912005 *Sep 24, 1906Feb 9, 1909Martin LehmanRacing amusement apparatus.
US1201206 *Feb 23, 1916Oct 10, 1916John A LewisDelivery apparatus.
US1366292 *Apr 26, 1920Jan 18, 1921Smith John WTransfer-table and switching system
US1550754 *Mar 5, 1925Aug 25, 1925Sockman George FRailway-car-transferring apparatus
US1939637 *Oct 31, 1930Dec 12, 1933Mechanical Transfer Car CorpMeans of storing motor vehicles
US2190073 *Feb 4, 1937Feb 13, 1940Knudsen Charles TTrain control system
US2277710 *Nov 19, 1938Mar 31, 1942Mertzanoff Christopher ESystem for producing shoes and analogous articles
US2526819 *Mar 2, 1946Oct 24, 1950Webb Co Jervis BConveyer track switch
US2626718 *Apr 19, 1949Jan 27, 1953Weber Ihno FParking system
US2717087 *Aug 16, 1949Sep 6, 1955Harold AugerMechanized storage apparatus
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3340820 *May 13, 1965Sep 12, 1967Victoriaville Furniture LtdConveyor system
US3442223 *Aug 8, 1966May 6, 1969Joseph E GrahamMethod and apparatus for loading or unloading vehicle carrying railway cars
US3448693 *Apr 25, 1968Jun 10, 1969Joseph E GrahamMethod and apparatus for loading or unloading vehicle carrying railway cars
US3919945 *Aug 12, 1974Nov 18, 1975Kojyo HisazuchiDevice for transferring railway cars sideways
US4109806 *Feb 25, 1977Aug 29, 1978Salen & Wicander Terminalsystem AbDevice for moving railway waggons
US5086904 *Oct 22, 1990Feb 11, 1992Matsushita Electric Industrial Co., Ltd.Part supply arrangement
US6418854 *Nov 21, 2000Jul 16, 2002Edwin R. KraftPriority car sorting in railroad classification yards using a continuous multi-stage method
US6516727 *Jul 31, 2001Feb 11, 2003Edwin R. KraftHigh capacity multiple-stage railway switching yard
US6769162 *Nov 29, 2000Aug 3, 2004General Electric CompanyRailcar maintenance process
DE3243364A1 *Nov 24, 1982May 24, 1984Mueller Wilhelm MaschfSystem for transferring mining waggons, in particular in underground mines
DE29505605U1 *Mar 31, 1995May 30, 1996Faller Jun AlexanderLokabstelle
WO2002042141A2 *Nov 14, 2001May 30, 2002Kraft Edwin RPriority car sorting in railroad classification yards using a continuous multi-stage method
WO2002042141A3 *Nov 14, 2001Aug 28, 2003Edwin R KraftPriority car sorting in railroad classification yards using a continuous multi-stage method
Classifications
U.S. Classification104/26.1, 104/48
International ClassificationB61J1/10, B61J1/00
Cooperative ClassificationB61J1/10
European ClassificationB61J1/10