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Publication numberUS2976890 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMar 28, 1961
Filing dateMay 29, 1956
Priority dateJun 3, 1955
Publication numberUS 2976890 A, US 2976890A, US-A-2976890, US2976890 A, US2976890A
InventorsRabeux Jean, Jacob Raymond
Original AssigneeSagem
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Circular loom
US 2976890 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

March 28, 1961 RABEUX ETAL 2,976,890

CIRCULAR LOOM Filed May 29, 1956 5 Sheets-Sheet 1 INVENTOR 3 J54 Pnagux Y 784 YMO/VD dbaoes ATTORNEYS March 28, 1961 J RABEUX ETAL 2,976,890

CIRCULAR LOOM Filed May 29, 1956 3 Sh88t$-$h8t 2 INVENTORS Jae/v Pms'sux BY P4 YMa/V, o'ncoas ATTORNEYS CIRCULAR LOOM 3 Sheets-Sheet 3 Filed May 29, 1956 Fig.5-

INVENTORS (ff/71V P/aasux BY Pxn Ma/vp 00033 ATTORNEYS United "States Patent CIRCULAR LOOM Jean Rabeux, Paris, and Raymond Jacob, Eaubonne, France, assignors to Societe dApplications Generales dElectricite & de Mecanique, Paris, France Filed May 29, 1956, Ser. No. 587,982

Claims priority, application France June 3, 1955 11 Claims. (Cl. 13913) This invention relates to supports for loom shuttles, and more particularly to shuttle supports adapted to perform a shuttle supporting function without interfering with, wearing, or destroying the threads being processed by the associated loom.

In the preparation of cloths and the like, one set of threads commonly known as warp threads are interengaged by a second set of threads usually designated as weft threads. There are various known methods for effecting this interengagement, but known processes generally involve arranging successive warp threads alternately on opposite sides of the weft threads so as to produce a weave.

In our copending application (Serial No. 398,616, filed December 16, 1953, now U.S. Patent No. 2,813,547, and assigned to the same assignee), of which this is a continuation-in-part, there is disclosed an improved mechanism for engaging warp and weft threads. More particularly, the copending application discloses an improvement for circular looms wherein the warp threads are divided into vertically spaced sets which converge together and are fed radially towards the center of the loom to a reed or guide at which the woven cloth is directed to an assembling mechanism. For the purpose of introducing weft threads between the warp threads, shuttles or hollow bodies feeding thread from within are passed between the spaced sets of warp threads. After the inclusion of each Weft thread, the sets of warp threads are caused to exchange positions in order to lock in the last deposited weft thread securely in position.

The improvement described in the preceding application relates to improved mechanisms for moving and guiding shuttles between the sets of warp threads with little or no frictional contact therebetween. This result is achieved by the utilization of an upper guide track encircling the loom and positioned above the upper set of warp threads, and adrive meanspositioned beneath the lower set of warp threads, driving each shuttle in the track and rotating with a peripheral speed equal to the linear speed of the shuttle. In this manner, a drive is imparted to a shuttle without frictional engagement with the warp threads.

This invention is concerned with improving the support of the shuttles in and against the upper guide track, and an object thereof is to provide an improved support device for maintaining the positions of shuttles in circular looms or other similar types of apparatus.

It has been inferred above that with movable devices, such as shuttles and their drives which move with respect to the threads being processed, friction can cause an undesirable deterioration of'thethreads involved. Since this is likewise true of supports provided for shuttles, it is accordingly a further object of the invention to provide animproved shuttle support which does not frictionally engage the threads being woven or in which the frictional engagement is minimized. 7

Furthermore, it will be appreciated that if a shuttle and a shuttle support are on opposite sides of a set of a finished weave which moves around the circular funnel warp threads these threads can be pinched or squeezed in such a manner as to cause their deterioration. It is, therefore, another object of the invention to provide an improved support while avoiding completely the introduction of a mechanism capable of destroying or weakening-threads in the aforestated manner, or, in fact, any other manner.

Briefly, without limiting the scope of the invention, one embodiment thereof may be employed in a circular loomwhich includes a circular track with at least one shuttle movable along this track, and driving means for propelling the shuttle. The invention provides a support on the side of the shuttle and between the sets of warp threads, and a further support mechanism outside of the space confined by the sets of warp threads and engaging the side support without friction. Furthermore, as will be shown in greater detail, the invention provides for spacing these two supports in such a manner as to preclude the pinching or squeezing of the warp threads without lessening the support and may, in fact, avoid the use of the last mentioned external support by providing for appropriately tensioning the warp threads for engaging the side support.

Advantageously, the mechanisms provided in accordance with the invention can be economically manufactured and simply incorporated into existing apparatus. Other objects and advantages of theinvention will be pointed out in the following description and claims and illustrated in the accompanying drawing which disclose the principles of the invention and the bestmode which has been contemplated of applying those principles.

Reference will next be made to the accompanying drawing, forming a part of this disclosure, inwhich:

Figure 1 illustrates a vertical section of that portion of a circular loom incorporating side and external shuttle supports in accordance with one embodiment of the invention;

Fig. 2 illustrates a bottom view of the apparatus shown in Fig. 1.

Fig. 3 is a vertical section of that portion of a circular loom incorporating shuttle supports in accordance with a second embodiment of the invention; 8

Fig. 4 is a side view of the apparatus shown in Fig. 3; v

Fig. 4a is a side view of Fig. 8a;

Fig. 5 shows one form of engagement between the shuttie and the guide track along which the shuttle is propelled;

Fig. 6 illustrates a second form of engagement between the shuttle and the guide track;

Fig. 7 illustrates a method of disengaging a shuttle from the guide track when these members are provided in accordance with the invention, and

Fig. 8 shows a shuttle drive for use with the invention, with the external shuttle support being fixed.

Fig. 8a is a fragmentary view corresponding to Fig. 8, showing .an embodiment in which the external support is being movable by being connected to the shuttle driving means.

.Figs. 1 and 2 illustrate that portion of a circular loom in which is incorporated a shuttle support of the inven tion and particularly illustrate the shuttle 1 positioned within the shed 2 constituted by vertically spaced sets of warp threadswhich converge towards the axis of the bodimentby an arm 24, to the side support 4 hereinafterreferred to in greater detail. The shuttle .1, in

its travel about the axis of the loom, deposits the weft thread within the shed 2 Whose sets of warp threadsoscillate vertically to lock in the weft thread to form guide to an assembling or roller mechanism (not shown).

The warp threads constituting the shed 2 may be of sufficient strength as to be capable of undergoing enough tension so that the side support 4 can be supported thereon and the shuttle 1 thereby held in position. However, as is frequently the case, the warp threads may be fine threads having insuflicient tensile strength as to be capable of resisting the necessary amount of tension. Accordingly, an external support 6 is incorporated into the loom and is positioned outside of, but in contact with, the shed 2 and thus supports the lower set of warp threads and the side support 4. With the side support 4 positioned as described, the shuttle 1 can be readily driven along the circular upper guide track 7 without fear of deraihnent or undesirable displacement.

Referring particularly to the side support 4, it is seen that this member is constituted by a horizontal flange from which depends in vertical direction the member which engages the lower set of warp threads. To facilitate the movement of the support 4 with the shuttle i, the support 4 can be an arcuate glide member as shown in Fig. 2, but its support function can be achieved by various configurations, of which the illustrated form is exemplary only.

The side support 4 and in particular its vertical depending member must engage the warp threads without causing wear or deterioration thereof. Accordingly, this member is constructed from a very hard and highly polished material such as, for example, treated steel which may be chrome plated or enameled. Furthermore, in order to permit movement of the shuttle 1 without frictional engagement with the shed 2, the side support 4 can be constructed so that the vertical depending member is composed of idling wheels or belts, whereby contact is made with the shed 2 without friction.

It will perhaps be observed that in the construction noted above, the warp threads carry the weight of the shuttle; however, it has been found that this downward force which'is placed on a large number of threads is negligible in operation, at which time the reaction of the forward thrust of the shuttle makes the stress placed on each warp thread very small. In fact, as has been noted above, in certain cases it has been found possible to dispense with the external support 6 by applying sufficient tension to the warp threads, whereby these threads without additional support are capable of maintaining the shuttle l in desired engagement with the track 7.

The external shuttle support may be conveniently and movably secured to the loom by attaching it to the support 36 of the drive wheels for the shuttle by means of a coupling member 90 as shown in Figs. 4a and 8a. In Figs. 4a and 8a the external shuttle support is indicated by do and is thus rotated at the same velocity as the shuttle. The external support may be carried instead by a stationary part of the loom as shown in the embodiment of Fig. 8, wherein the external support indicated by reference numeral 6 is carried by the guide 5 fixed to the loom.

The external support 6 which is employed where the warp threads are not of sufiicient strength to withstand the necessary longitudinal tension to fix the shuttle 1 in the track 7 contacts the underside of the shed 2 and is radially or horizontally spaced from the support 4. It is sufficiently close to the support 4- asto maintain the shuttle 1 in position, but it is sufficiently spaced from the support 4 as to prevent the warp threads from being pinched or squeezed and, also, to enable the shuttle I to be disengaged from the track 7, as will be shown.

The external support 6, when the construction of the loom permits, may be a complete circular track rigidly affixed to the loom as indicated in Fig. 2 or may be composed of arcuate segments. Arcuate segments can be employed which are movable with respect to the loom and which are driven by the same means as are used to 4 drive the shuttle. In this latter instance, the shuttle and associated arcuate segment are driven synchronously at the same speed so that these members always occupy the same relative positions with respect to one another.

If segments are employed, they can be provided with highly polished surfaces such as have been noted above for the side supports 4. However, the invention also contemplates the use of idling or driven wheels or belts as shown in Figs. 3 and 4. In Figs. 3 and 4, the lower support is constituted by a belt 8 and the wheels 9 and 10, one of which is an idling wheel and the other of which is diagrammatically shown as being driven by the drive mechanism 13, 14 and 15 which in turn are driven by the rack 11 and the crown gear 12. It will be appreciated that in this construction the linear or peripheral speed of the belt 8 is controlled to be equal to the speed of the shuttle in its travel around the loom, so that no friction exists between the belt and the Warp threads traversed. Alternatively, wheels 9 and ill can both be idling wheels supported on a driven body.

In addition to the minimizing of friction, it has already been pointed out that the invention provides supports which do not pinch or squeeze the: warp threads because of the horizontal or radial spacing of these supports. It will further be appreciated that these supports delineate an oblique section of the shed 2 such that any horizontal or centripetal force applied to the shuttle I is resisted and overcome by the supports 4 and 6. Thus, not only is a support and guide provided for loom shuttles, but also a positive centripetal-force resisting means.

To supplement this force resisting means, the shuttle I can engage the track 7 as shown by the particular examples of Figs. 5 and 6. Fig. 5 illustrates the body 3 of the shuttle provided with a shoe 20 which engages the track 7. The shoe 20 is provided with a flange 21 in the embodiment of Fig. 5 which laterally engages the track '7 and supplements the force resisting means noted above.

In Fig. 6, the track 7 and the shoe 20 are provided respectively with the oblique or inclined surfaces 22 and 23 which are suitable alternatives for the modification of Fig. 5. These modifications can themselves be replaced by other configurations or devices which perform the function of resisting horizontal forces in combination with the supports 4- and 6.

The modifications of Figs. 5 and 6 do not interfere with the operation of disengaging the shuttle 1 from the track 7 as is illustrated in Fig. 7. This operation includes the simple step of tilting the shuttle 1 about a horizontal axis which simplicity is due to the manner of support by the supports 4 and 6 which facilitate the disengaging operation. Accordingly, the invention features a construction wherein the parts can be easily maintained and assembled as well as disassembled.

The embodiments and modifications of the invention which have been described illustrate the improvements which have been contemplated with respect to the copending application, Serial No. 398,616, and the heretofore known art. However, to complete the disclosure, Fig. 8 illustrates a drive mechanism for impelling a shuttle along a circular track as well as an external support therewith in those embodiments of the invention in which the external support is movable.

' In Fig. 8, those parts of the device which correspond to parts in other figures have like numerals. A drive wheel 3' (see also Fig. 4 wherein drive wheel 3' is shown in position forpropelling the shuttle and Fig. 2 wherein drive wheel 3 is shown in engagement with wheel 2 journalled on the body 3 of the shuttle) is keyed to a shaft 32 journalled in the bearings of a support 36 secured to a toothed ring 37 which is rotatable around the axis 38 of the loom. The ring 37, engaged with the rollers 39 and 44 which are rotatably mounted on a stationary mem-. ber 42 of the loom, may be rotated by means of a drivns pi o i s ashing i h h eeth o t ns acrea e The rotatable support 36 is kept stable by means of a pair of rollers 39and 40 which may idle upon shafts (not shown) and may be rotated by a pinion gear 41 which forces the rotating support against the roller 30. The support 36 is further stabilized by means of a gear 12. A shaft 30 rotatably mounted in the bearings of the support 36 is rigidly connected with a pinion 13 operatively connected with the driving wheel 3' through the meshing pinions 1'4 and 15, the pinion 15 being keyed to the shaft 32 carrying the driving wheel 3. Thus, upon rotation of the ring 37 by the pinion 41, the stationary crown 11 drives through the medium of the pinion 12 secured to the shaft 30, the train of gears 13, 14 and 15 (see also Fig. 3) mounted on the shaft 32 rotated by this train of gears. In Figs. 3 and 4, one of the wheels 9 or is shown as connected to the train of gears 13, 14 and 15, so as to drive the belt 8 in accordance with the speed of the shuttle 1.

There will now be obvious to those skilled in the art many modifications and variations of the apparatus described which accomplish many or all of the objects and advantages of the invention but which do not depart essentially from the spirit of the invention as defined in the following claims.

What is claimed is:

. 1. In a circular loom having a circular track and a circular funnel interiorly placed from said circular track and concentric therewith and having a shed of spaced sets of warp threads supported at the apex of converging threads by said circular funnel, said warp threads being woven with weft threads to form a cloth, the improvement comprising at least one shuttle movable along said track around a longitudinal axis of said loom, driving means for propelling said shuttle operatively connected thereto, means on the upper portion of said shuttle slidably supported against said track, a projecting support member extending from said shuttle toward the longitudinal axis of said loom within the shed for slidably abutting against the lower set of said warp threads and urging said shuttle away from the lower set of said warp threads, and a support member connected to said loom outside said shed of warp threads and abutting against the lower set of warp threads from outside the shed, said support member being spaced further away from the longitudinal axis of said loom than said circular funnel.

2. In a circular loom having a circular track and a circular funnel interiorly spaced from said circular track and concentric therewith and having a spaced set of warp threads converged horizontally and inwardly towards the center of the loom to form a shed, said warp threads being supported by said funnel at their apex and woven with weft threads to form a cloth, the improvement comprising at least one shuttle movable within the shed along said track around the longitudinal axis of said loom, driving means for propelling said shuttle operatively connected thereto, guide means on the upper portion of said shuttle in contact with said track, first support means extending from the side of said shuttle toward the longitudinal axis of said loom within the shed for slidably engaging the lowermost set of warp threads and urging said shuttle away from the lower set ofsaid threads, and

second support means for the lower set of threads connected to said loom outside said shed, said second support means being horizontally spaced from said first support means in the direction of said circular funnel and being positioned below and supporting the lowermost set of warp threads.

3. In a circular loom as claimed in claim 2, wherein said first support means extends inwardly towards the center of the loom and said second means is positioned between the circular funnel and said first support means.

4. In a circular loom as claimed in claim 3, wherein said first support means comprises a horizontal arm extending towards the center of said loom from the side of the shuttle and an arcuate glide member extending downwardly from said horizontal arm for slidably engaging the lowermost set of warp threads.

5. In a circular loom as claimed in claim 4, wherein said second support means is a fixed circular support having its center corresponding to the center of the circular loom and being connected thereto.

6. In a circular loom as claimed in claim 4-, wherein said second support means is a movable member engaging the lowermost set of warp threads and being rotatably connected to said circular loom, said circular loom further comprising coupling means for coupling said movable member to said driving means, so that said movable member is driven synchronously with said shuttle.

7. In a circular loom as claimed in claim 6, wherein said movable member is an arcuate segment having a highly polished surface for engaging the lowermost set of warp threads.

8. In a circular loom as claimed in claim 6, wherein said movable member comprises idling wheels and a belt supported on said idling wheels for engaging the lowermost set of warp threads.

9. In a circular loom as claimed in claim 6, wherein said movable member comprises driving wheels and a belt driven by said driving wheels, said driving wheels being operatively coupled to said driving means so that the peripheral speed of said belt is equal to the speed of travel of said shuttle.

10. In a circular loom as claimed in claim 2, wherein the means on the upper portion of said shuttle comprises a flange for engaging said track and resisting centripetal forces on said shuttle.

11. In a circular m as claimed in claim 2, wherein the means on the upper portion of said shuttle and said track comprise engaging inclined surfaces for resisting centripetal forces on said shuttle.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,998,815 MacDonald Apr. 23, 1935 2,154,903 Jabouley Apr. 18, 1939 2,238,658 Pelce et a1. Apr. 15, 1941 2,252,470 Pelce Aug. 12, 1941 2,398,957 Pelee Apr. 23, 1946 2,544,766 Rabeux et a1 Mar. 13, 1951 2,737,207 Lariviere Mar. 6, 1956

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1998815 *Jan 27, 1934Apr 23, 1935Hood Rubber Co IncMethod and apparatus for weaving articles of curvilinear form
US2154903 *Dec 27, 1937Apr 18, 1939Celanese CorpCircular loom
US2238658 *Mar 10, 1939Apr 15, 1941Saint Freres SaCircular weaving loom
US2252470 *Jun 20, 1940Aug 12, 1941Saint Freres Sa SocWeaving loom
US2398957 *Feb 14, 1945Apr 23, 1946Saint FreresDevice for guiding shuttles on circular weaving looms
US2544766 *Jan 26, 1949Mar 13, 1951Saint Freres SocAnticreep warp-lifting roller in circular weaving looms
US2737207 *Feb 19, 1952Mar 6, 1956Saint Freres Sa SocWarp crossing means for circular weaving looms
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3347279 *Dec 28, 1964Oct 17, 1967Iwan Simonis S A SaMeans for driving and braking shuttles for circular looms
US3848641 *Jun 4, 1973Nov 19, 1974Vyzk Ustav BavlnarskyWeft inserter for travelling-wave shedding looms
US4915494 *Jul 6, 1988Apr 10, 1990Harris CorporationCarbon-carbon mirror for space applications
US4977933 *Feb 21, 1989Dec 18, 1990Joss CompanyCircular loom for weaving ribbon-shaped materials
Classifications
U.S. Classification139/458, 139/457
International ClassificationD03D37/00
Cooperative ClassificationD03D2700/162, D03D37/00
European ClassificationD03D37/00