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Publication numberUS2977961 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 4, 1961
Filing dateDec 6, 1957
Priority dateDec 6, 1957
Publication numberUS 2977961 A, US 2977961A, US-A-2977961, US2977961 A, US2977961A
InventorsBuchholz Arnold R, Frank Haban
Original AssigneeBrandt Automatic Cashier Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Coin sorting machine
US 2977961 A
Images(6)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

April 4, 1961 A. R. BUCHHOLZ ETAL 2,977,961

com SORTING MACHINE Filed Dec. 6, 1957 6 Sheets-Sheet 1 INVENTORS Maw I "Mi Z2111 k April 4, 1961 A. R. BUCHHOLZ ET AL 2,977,961

COIN SORTING MACHINE Filed Dec. 6,1957

6 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTORS B H aweda BY ?M m w IMA April 4, 1961 A. R. BUCHHOLZ ETAI.

COIN SORTING MACHINE 6 Sheets-Sheet 3 Filed Dec. 6, 1957 KIIgig ENTORS 9% w Q d 931w! fl-Hys.

April 1961 A. R. BUCHHOLZ ET AL 2,977,961

COIN SORTING MACHINE 6 Sheets-Sheet 4 Filed Dec. 6, 1957 VNTORS April 4, 1961 A. R. BUCHHOLZ ET Al. 2,977,961

COIN SORTING MACHINE 6 Sheets-Sheet 5 Filed Dec. 6, 195'! .2 I Z Z z m i M Z k; a; 4 I Z w .1 a 5 s 9 4 L F ,A p n m M a a, 5 ma 4 9 w a w. 2/ PIQ INVENTORJ QAAAZMQG M A. R. BUCHHOLZ ET AL 2,977,961

April 4, 1961 COIN SORTING MACHINE 6 Sheets-Sheet 6 Filed Dec. 6, 1957 United States Patent O COIN SORTING MACHINE Arnold R. Buchholz and Frank Haban, Watertown, Wis., assignors to Brandt Automatic Cashier Company, Watertown, Wis., a corporation of,,Wisconsin Filed Dec. 6, 1957, Set. No. 701,078

14 Claims. c1. 133-3 The invention relates to coin sorting machines.

The main object of the invention is to provide a coin sorting machine embodying certain desirable features of the machine shown in the application Serial No. 570,306, filed March 8, 1956, of Albert G. Blanchette and Victor G. Ristvedt, for Coin Sorter, now Patent No. 2,906,276,

issued September 29, 1959, but with improvements in these features-and an improved arrangement for disposing the coins in single file and in abutting relation as they pass to the sorting station. In the prior application above re ferred to the speed capabilities of the sorting devices could not be realized because the type of feed of the coins from the hopper cut down the over all speed of operation of the machine. In any sorting mechanism the sorting speed is determined by the sorting devices and the speed with which coins from a batch of unsorted coins can be delivered to these devices. In the present application a new and improved feed arrangement of the coins from the hopper is provided together with a recycling of any coins that may be superimposed on coins proceeding in single file. This application is a continuation in part of our prior application Serial No. 573,491, filed March 23, 1956, now abandoned, and our application Serial No. 671,282, filed July 11, 1957, now abandoned, for CoinSorting Machines, and includes in addition to gate means of these prior applications a pickup means for insuring only a single file relation of coins as they reach the sorting area and an improved form of rotary feed disc preferably having' an inclined central portion to aid in directing the coins received from an overhead centrally disposed feed means to a single file arrangement on the outer portion of the disc and makes it possible to sort coins at the rate of one hundred to twenty-five hundred or more coins a minute.

A further object of the invention is to provide an arrangement in which there is a continuous feed of the coins to the sorting station, and on the stoppage of the. machine, coins on the inner surface of the disc are automatically prevented from traveling to'the outer periphery of the disc as the machine is stoppedand the sorting of those coins in the sorting section is completed. i

The inventionfurther consists in the several features hereinafter described and more particularly defined by claims at the conclusion hereof.

In the drawings:

Fig. 1 is a plan view of a coin sorter embodying the invention, parts being broken away;

Fig. 2 is an end elevation view of the coin sorter with parts broken away;

Fig. 3 is a vertical sectional view taken on the line 3-3 of Fig. 1, parts being broken away;

Fig. 4 is a horizontal sectional view taken on the line 44 of Fig. 3, parts beyond the feeding disc being omitted;

Fig. 5 is a schematic plan development of the sorting region of'the peripheral portion of the disc;

Fig. 6 is a detailed plan view of the coin stopping gate;

2,977,961 Patented Apr. 4, 1961 Fig. 7 is a side elevation view of the stopping gate looking along the line 7-7 of Fig. 6;

Fig. 8 is an enlarged vertical sectional view taken on the line 8-8 of Fig. 1;

Fig. 9 is a circuit diagram for certain of the parts;

Fig. 10 is a, perspective view of the end of the top feed conveyor;

Fig. 11 is a detailed vertical sectional line 11-11 of Fig. 1;

Fig. 12 is a plan view of parts shown in Fig. 11;

Fig. 13 is a detailed sectional view showing certain modifications;

Fig. 14 is a detailed vertical sectional view taken on the line 14-14 of Fig. 1;

Fig. 15 is a detailed vertical sectional view similar to Fig. 3 showing certain modifications;

Fig. 16 is a detailed vertical sectional view taken on the line 16-16 of Fig. 1; I

Fig. 17 is a detailed front elevation view of the file insuring pickup;

Fig. 18 is a detailed vertical sectional view taken on the line 18-18 of Fig. 2.

view taken on the Referring to Fig. 1, the machine includes a hopper 14 for receiving the coins to be sorted, a rotary disc 15 cooperating with fixed sorting members 16, means for driving said disc, means for continuouslyfeeding coins from the hopper to the central portion of the rotating disc, and means for returning unsorted coins to said hopper, the machine having a base 17.

Referring to Figs. 1 and 2, the means for feeding the coins to be sorted from supply hopper 14 tothe disc 15 includes an elevating endless-conveyor 18 having flights 19 by which coins are carried fiatwise up from the hopper to an elevated position and allowed to drop 01f of said conveyor onto a continuously movable belt conveyor 20 that carries them between its side plates 21 to a short delivery chute 22 by which they are directed flatwise down onto the surface of the disc 15. .An inclined deflector plate 34 is mounted between the side plates 21 and extends down close to the back end portion of the belt 20 to The conveyor 18 may follow the details of the conveyor shown in detail in the prior US. Patent No.-

2,581,074, to A. R. Buchholz et al., dated January 1, 1952, and including spaced sprockets, one of'which as indicated in Fig. 1 has its shaft connected by a belt and pulley drive connection BP with the output shaft 0 of a reduction geared motor CM.

Referring to Fig. 2, the endless belt of conveyor 20 runs over spaced rollers 24, and 25, the roller 25 being mounted on a shaft 26 carrying a pulley 27 connected by a belt 28 with a pulley 29 on a shaft 30 which carries a pulley 31 connected by a belt 32 with a pulley 33 on a shaft 35 that in turn carries a pulley 36 connected by a belt 37 with a pulley 38 on the drive shaft of an electric motor DM. The surface speed of the belt is higher than that of the conveyor 18 so as to better take care of the multiple of coins thatmay be delivered from one set of flights 19 of the conveyor by permitting these coins to be spread out on conveyor 20. 7

Referring to Fig. 3, the disc 15 is bolted to a top plate 39 mounted on a shaft 40. Plate 39 is journalled in' a 40 having a splined connection 44 at itsupper end with a centrally disposed opening'45 in the disc. Shaft 40 has a a J a threaded extension 46 having a keyed connection 47 with a worm wheel 48 which is clamped to said shaft between a shoulder thereon and a nut 49 on said extension.. Worm wheel 48 meshes with a worm 50 keyed to the shaft 35 so that the motor DM drives both the disc 15 and the conveyor 26. The disc 15 has a central conical portion 51 that extends upwardly from its major flat outer surface 52. The speeds of the belt 20 and the disc 15 are such as to permit the abutting single file relationship of the coins as they pass and reach the peripheral portion of said disc.

A coin stop means is associated with the disc to limit the outward travel of the coins on the disc. This stop means may be a separate ring member 54a supported on a fixed part of the machine frame so as to overhang or overlap the peripheral portionof the disc with a working clearance between these parts as shown in Fig. 13. The stopmeans is preferably formed either as an integral part of the rim of the disc or preferably, because of wear, is formed. as a separable ring 54 secured to the rim portion of the disc by screws 55. Adjacent the ring 54, the surface of the disc has an annular groove 56 for dimes and tokens and a single annular groove 57 for half dollars and a wide annular groove 58 for handling the other denominations of coins. These grooves form depressions in the face of the disc, the wide groove being about half the diameter of a dime. The grooves are preferably made in this fashion so that relatively thick metal may be used for the pickups or sorting members 16 hereinafter described.

It is to be noted that where the outer limit stop means is a fixed rim member, this member need not be truly circular but may in the sorter section be an involute or spiral curve, in which case only a single circular gnoove is necessary on the disc in which all the pickups work, said pickups being circumferentially spaced from each other relative to the curvature of the rim so that the same selective sorting action will result as hereinafter described.

In order for the pickups to be effective, the coins to be sorted must move in single file along the peripheral grooved portion of the disc, and for this purpose a plate 59, anchored to the top 60 of the frame by screws S, has a portion 59a that extends inwardly over the intermediate and peripheral portion of the disc over an area of about three-quarters of the area of the disc as shown in Fig. 1, leaving an exposed area 61, the inner circular edge 62 of said plate portion 59a being disposedwell above the surface of the disc so that it does not restrict the flow of coins passing under it along the disc, but it does confine the discharge of coins from the conveyor to the area defined by said inner edge 62 and which would also act to deflect any endwise moving coin that might strike this edge toward the disc. The spiralled peripheral portion of plate portion 59a has a spirally curved bandlike guide member 63 suspended therefrom, the lower edge of which is substantially parallel to the surfaces of the disc 15 over which it is disposed and extends down so close to these surfaces that no coins or other disc-like articles to be separated can pass under it. One end 63a of this guide member is disposed back from the grooved portion of the disc 15 at one side of the area 61 and the other end 63b of said member is disposed outwardly of the peripheral portion of disc 15 at the other side of the exposed area 61 as shown in Fig. 4.

The portion of the top of the frame adjacent the exposed area 61 of the disc 15 and its rim portion and a part adjacent thereto have chute portions A and B communicating through an opening 64 in the upper part of the supply hopper 14 so that should any coin or coins be superimposed upon another coin or coins, as they travel on the disc 15 vthrough this area, such superimposed coin or coins will be projected by centrifugal force into these chute portions to be guided thereby into the hopper.

The ring 54 is high or thick enough to confine the thicle.

4 est coin but not thick enough to retain a superimposed pair of thinner coins or tokens. With the arrangement shown it has been found that there is very little tendency for coins to be superimposed on each other.

In order that a single file relationship of the coins is insured before they reach the sorting station and to prevent other coins on the disc interfering with this relationship, a metal pickup AA, as shown in Figs. 1 and 17, is secured to the end 63a of guide 63, said pickup having a pointed end finger portion AB extending down into the groove 57 and having its upper edge AC bent or flared outwardly from its base to provide a coin deflector edge along which coins can ride and be deflected over other coins passing in single file relationship on the disc and outwardly off said disc onto the depressed portion B and thence to the hopper 14 or depending upon the existing coin formation, said finger portion may deflect coins inwardly of the disc 15.

A series of sorting members or pickups 16, one for each denomination of coin, cooperate with the kinetic energy imparted by the disc to the coins and the stop means to sort and guide the coins upwardly, outwardly, and away (see Figs. 8, 11 and 12) from the peripheral portion of the disc. Each pickup is a metal member having a flat plate or base portion 65 and a finger portion 66, the major part of which extends at right angles to the portion 65 and inclines downwardly and tapers to a pointed end 67, and its upper edge is bent or flared outwardly from the body portion of the finger to provide an outwardly inclined coin deflector edge 68 along which the coin can ride and be deflected outwardly off the disc 15 along the top portion into the mouth 69 of a delivery chute 70 having a top hood portion 71, each chute discharging into a bag B secured to its lower end by split ring R as indicated in Figs. 2 and 18. The base portion of each pickup 16 is detachably and adjustably secured by screws 73 anchored in plate portion 59a and passing through slots 74 in said base portion. These pickups are secured to plate portion 59a so that their finger portions 66 at their pointed ends will be tangentially disposed relative to the grooves in the disc and will extend down into a groove to a point above its bottom and below the top surface of the disc as shown in Fig. 8. The pointed end of one of the pickups 16 extends down into the groove 56 to act on a token, the

pointed end of the next pickup is radially spaced from the first named pickup and extends into the same groove 56 to act on the dime, the pointed end of another pickup extends down into the groove 57 to act upon the half dollar while the pointed ends of the other pickups extend down into the groove 58 and are so spaced radially of the rim as to individually act to remove the pennies,

. nickels, and quarters. The pickups, as shown in Fig. 1,

crease the output of the machine, the inner cone inclina-- are so arranged that the one for the largest diameter coin, the half dollar, will be given the first chance to separate or sort such coin and the other pickups are sequentially arranged from the larger to the smaller coins or tokens so that the last pickup separates the smallest article, in this case the token.

Instead of a disc having a flat top face, we have found that the disc 15a shown in Fig. 15 gives very good results. This disc is similar in all respects to the disc 15 and similarly mounted by the same'means shown in Fig. 3 and, therefore, similarly designated except that from its centrally disposed conical portion 51a it has a' peripheral upwardly inclined portion 52a and a oonically curved intermediate portion 53a merging with said conical portions 51a and 52a. By way of example, the conical portion 51a may have an inclination of fifteen degrees and the conical portion 52a an inclination of four degrees from thehorizontal though it will be understood that these stated inclinations may be varied as it has been found that as the speed of the disc is increased to intion should be decreased and the outer cone inclination above example has not been given by way of limitation.

The speeds of the belt 20 and the disc 15a are such' as to permit the abutting single file relationship of the coins as they pass to the peripheral portion of the disc 15a. This disc has the grooves 56a, 57a, and 58a similar to the grooves 56, 57, and 58 of the disc 15 formed therein and carries the stop'ring 54b similar to thestop ring 54a. The same pickups 16 and AA previously described are used with the disc 15a and operate similarly to remove coins from the disc, the pickups 16 acting to sort the coins. For this disc a guide member 63a similar to the guide 63 but somewhat more elongated is used.

When the drive motor DM for the disc 15 or 15a is shut off, the disc willcontinueno' rotate at a gradually diminishing speed until it comes to a stop, and under these conditions coins may be left on the peripheral portions of the disc which due to reduced speed of the disc as it slows down or its reduced speed as it is started up may not be properly sorted. While the motor DM may be run continuously to sort all the coins coming to the machine from the conveyor'20, the motor CM having been shut off, there may be times when it is desirable to stop the sorting while coins are still on the disc. To' take care of this situation, gate structures have been provided, one to stop coins on the inner surface of the disc from traveling to the outer or peripheral portion of the disc'as the machine is stopped and the other acting on the peripheral po-rtionof the disc tostop coins thereon 78 in plate 59 and is normally urged to its outer full line position by a torsion spring 79, the pin 77 being held by said spring against a slide block 80 slidably mounted in the plate 59 and having an upstanding portion 81 operatively connected by a link' 82 with the slotted outer end of the plunger 83 of a solenoid DS mounted on said plate 59. Energization of solenoid DS draws in its plunger and consequently moves the block 80 outwardly relative to thefdisc 15 to push the pin 77 to the other end of the slot 78 and consequently swing the gate member 75 into its dotted line position. Where this gate structure is used in connection with the disc 15a, suitable provision should be made to cant the position of the parts above described so that the gate will swing just above and parallel to the inclined portion 52a of the disc 15a.

The other gate structure including a bracket 84 suspended from the frame of the machine having a spring hanger 85, a support 86 for a stop screw 87, and a mounting 88 for the coil ofa solenoid GS. A pin 89 on the bracket has a'lever 90, intermediately pivoted thereon carrying a gate member 91. A spring92 connected at one end to hanger 85 and at its other end to the gate carrying arm of said lever 90 normally holds the gate far enough above the disc 15 or 15a so as not to interfere with passage of coins on the disc or superimposed coins that may beprojected off the disc. The otherarm of the lever 90 is operatively connected by a pin 93 to the slotted end of the plunger 94' of the solenoid GS. The screw 87 is adjustable to limit the lowcred position of the gate member so that no coins can pass ,between it and the disc. noid; pulls up the plunger 94 to swing the gate downwardly to blocking position, either to its dotted line position shown in Fig.7," or down upon a passing coin to stop it and thereby block other coins from passing it.

Referring to Fig. 9, the numerals 95 and 9 6 designate currentsupply lines and 97 a branch conductor from 96 having relay operated switches 98"and 99 therein and Energization of the sole- 6 connected with one terminal of the motor DM whose other terminal connects by conductor a with conductor 95. Conductor 96 includes a manually operable switch 100. Delayed action relays R1, R2, R3 and R4 are connected in parallel with conductors 95 and 96. Solenoids DS and GS are normally connected in parallel with conductors 95 and 96 by conductors 101 and 102, respectively, including switches S2 and S3. Motor CM has one of its terminals connected by conductor 95b with conductor 95 and its other terminal is connected to a conductor 103 with conductor 96.

The above described electrical system, when the switch 100 is opened, operates to stop the motor CM and, therefore, the conveyor 18, allows the drive motor DM to continue to operate at machine operating speed for sufiicient time to sort coins remaining on'conveyor 20 and disc 15, actuates the coin deflector gate member 75 prior to the actuation of the gate member 91 to remove coins from the disc rim and gate area, actuates gate member 91 prior to breaking current to motor DM, and holds the gate members 75 and 91 in their actuated positions after the drive motor circuit has been broken for a time sulficiently long enough to assure the drive motor has stopped rotation of the disc. This action prevents the feeding of coins into the sorting area after or before the speed of the disc drops below a proper sorting speed.

In Fig. 9 the switch 100 is shown in its 0 position. When this switch is moved to its on position, current passes via conductors 96 and 103, motor CM, conductor 95b to return conductor 95 starting motor CM and current also flows through relays R1, R2, R3 and R4 to close switches 98 and 99 and open switches S2 and S3. On closure of switches 98 and 99 current now also passes from conductor 96 to conductor 97, motor DM, conductor 95a to return conductor 95 starting motor DM so that both motors CM and DM are opearting during sorting. When switch 100 is shifted to its 0 position, the circuit to motor CM is stopped, thereby stopping conveyor 18 and further delivery of coins to conveyor 20, and after a delay of five seconds switch 99 is opened to stop the motor DM, and after a delay of three seconds switch S2 moves to its closed position, and after a delay of five seconds switch S3 moves to its closed position, and since switch 98 remains closed for a period of ten seconds, current can flow from conductor 97 including .switch 98 through conductor 101 including solenoid DS and through conductor 102 including solenoid GS to the return conductor. 95 so that for a period of seven seconds the gate member 75 is swung in to deflect coins on the disc away from the outer portion thereof and for a period of five seconds the gate member 91 is down'to stop coins on the outer portion of the disc 15 or 15a from moving into the sorter section, and during the very short interval required to sort any coinsthen on the peripheral portion of the disc, such coins will be sorted before the speed of the motor DM drops appreciably.

With the above construction, coins are deposited in the hopper and the switch 89 then closed to start the motors CM and DM to drive the conveyors 18 and 20 and rotate the disc 15 as previously described. Conveyor 18 then acts to lift coins from the hopper 14 and discharge them from its flights onto the rear end portion of the conveyor 20 which carries them along in a spread out condition to its outer end where they drop onto the inclined chute 22 which as shown in Fig. 1 has a V-notched delivery edge 94 that straddles the top of the cone portion 51 or 51a of the disc 15 or 15a and is closely spaced therefrom to deliver the coins in a flatwise position onto said coin portion. As the coins hit said cone portion 51 or 51a under the action of centrifugal force set up, in the coins by the rotating disc, they fan out radially from the upper end of this portion and are carried down this cone portion radially outwardly from its center either along the Hat surface of disc 15 or into the intermediate portion 53a of disc 15a and then radially outwardly and along the 7 surface 52 of disc 15 or the upwardly inclined portion 52a of the disc 15a until they strike the spiral guide 63 where some of them assume a single file relationship with said guide as indicated in Fig. 4 so that by the time they reach the end 63b of said guide they are, under the action of centrifugal force, free to assume a single file abutting relationship on the grooved peripheral portion of the disc as they strike the stop means such as the ring 54 or 54a as they move through the open area 61. Since other coins may then be abutting this single file of coins when these coins are advanced to the area of the pickup AA, this pickup will act to either throw these abutting coins off the disc or push them radially inwardly of the disc. Thereafter, the outer layer of the coins, still in an abutting single file relationship with each other so that the whole of this area of the disc is utilized for feeding purposes, the coins are carried by the pickups 16 and sorted first by being raised up from the disc 15 or 15a and then directed along the top edge 68 upwardly in the same direction and toward the mouth 69 of the chute 79, the coins actually being air borne to this mouth and not slowed up in any way as they ride the pickups which makes for faster sorting. In this connection the ordinary mechanically operated counter is too slow for use in connection with this sorter and would if it were of the coin operated type materially reduce the sorting speed. From the above it will be noted that as soon as the coins leave the hopper 14, they are in a state of continuous movement along moving surfaces relative to which they may slide until they reach the pickups along which they slide or roll and be projected thereby into the chutes 7% The construction above described provides a coin sorting machine which has at least a five fold increase in sorting speed as compared to known sorting machines.

The term coins as used in the claims includes unless otherwise specifically limited tokens or similar round discs.

We desire it to be understood that this invention is not to be limited to any particular form or arrangement of parts except in so far as such limitations are included in the appended claims.

What is claimed in our invention is:

1. In a coin sorting machine, the combination of a rotary disc having a top surface on which coins are free to move radially outwardly by centrifugal force induced by said discs rotation, means for limiting the initial outward movement of coins on said disc to an area back from the outer portion of said disc and for directing coins from this area to the outer portion of the surface of said disc to form a single file of coins thereon, drive means for said disc, means, operable as said drive means is stopped, for confining coins in said area to said area, means for supplying a succession of coins to said area to permit their free movement radially outwardly over the same as substantially single layer units, means for limiting the outward radial travel of coins on the outer portion of said disc in their single file movement thereon, a sorting station, a series of selectively positioned coinlifting means at said sorting station, one for each diametrical size of coin, operable on said single file of coins as they pass through said sorting station in cooperative relation with said outward limit means and the energy imparted to the coins by the disc to sortably remove the coins therefrom, and gate means, operable on the coins on the outer portion of said disc as said drive means is stopped, for preventing the passage of coins from this outer portion area of said disc to said sorting station.

2. In a coin sorting machine, the combination of a rotary disc having a top surface on which coins are free to move radially outwardly by centrifugal force induced by said discs rotation, means for limiting the initial outward movement of coins on said disc to an area back from the outer portion of said disc and for directing coins from this area to the outer portion of the surface of said disc to form a single-file of coins thereon,

means for supplying a succession of coins to said area to permit their free movement radially outward over the same as substantially single layer units, means for limiting the outward radial travel of coins on the outer portion of said disc in their single file movement thereon,

a sorting station, a series. of selectively positioned coinlifting means at said sorting station, one for each diametrical size of coin, operable on said single file of coins as they pass through said sorting station in cooperative relation with said outward limit means and the energy imparted to the coins by the disc to sortably remove the coins therefrom, drive means for said disc including an electrical motor, a current supply for said motor including a control switch, deflector gate means operable as said drive means is stopped for confining coins in said inner area to said area and a second gate means operable on the coins on the outer portion of said disc as said drive means is stopped for preventing passage of coins from this outer portion to said sorting station, solenoid operated means for each of the aforesaid gate means, a supply circuit for each of said solenoids including a delayed action relay operable when said control switch is in its off position, the relay for the first named gate means having a lesser delay period than that for the second named gate means.

3. In a denominational value coin sorting machine comprising a rotary disc having a top surface on which coins of different diameters are free to move radially outward by centrifugal force induced by said discs rotation, means limiting the initial movement of the coins on said disc to an area back from the outer portion of said disc and for directing coins from this area to the outer portion of the surface of said disc to form a single file of coins thereon, and a series of selectively positioned coin lifting means, one for each diametrical size of coin, operable on said single file of coins on said outer portion of said disc in cooperative relation with parts of said disc and the energy imparted to the coins by said disc to sortably remove the coins therefrom; the combination therewith of means for supplying a succession of coins to said area to permit their free movement over the same as substantially single layer units, means adapted to reject coins inwardly adjacent to coins moving along the outer portion of said disc so as to maintain single-file movement of said outer coins, and means for limiting the outward travel of coins on the outer rim of said disc but permitting the removal from the disc by centrifugal force of super-imposed coins from other coins on said disc.

4. In a denominational value coin sorting machine comprising a rotary disc having a top surface on which coins of different diameters are free to move radially outward by centrifugal force induced by said discs rotation, means for limiting the initial movement of coins on said disc to an area back from the outer portion of said disc and for directing coins from this area to the outer portion of the surface of said disc to form a single file of coins thereon, and a series of selectively positioned coin-lifting means, one for each diametrical size of coin, operable on said single file of coins on said outer portion of said disc in cooperative relation with parts of said disc and the energy imparted to the coins by said disc to sortably remove the coins therefrom; the combination therewith of means for supplying a succession of coins to said area to permit their free movement over the same as substantially single layer units, means for limiting the outward travel of coins on the outer portion of said disc but per-' mitting the removal from the disc by centrifugal force of a superimposed coin from other coins in their single file movement on said disc.

5. In a denominational value coin sorting machine comprising a rotary disc having a top surface on which coins of different diameters are free to move radially outwardly by centrifugal forceinduced by said discs rotation, means for limiting the initial movement of coins on said disc to an area back from the outeinportion of said disc and for directing coins from this area to the outer portion of the surface of said disc to form a single file of coins thereon, and a series of selectively positioned coin-lifting means, one for each diametrical size of coin, operable on said single file of coins on said outer portion of said disc in cooperative relation with parts of said disc and the energy imparted to the coins by said disc to sortably remove the coins therefrom; the combination therewith of a separately distinct storage hopper for the coins to be sorted and means for feeding a succession of coins from said hopper to said area to-perrnit'their free radially outward movement over said area as substantially single layer units, andmeans for limiting the outward travel 7 removed superimposed coin into said hopper.

6. In a denominational value coin sorting machine comprising a rotary disc having a top surface on which coins of different diameters are free to move radially outward by centrifugal force induced by said discs rotation, means for limiting the initial movement of coins on said disc to an area back from the outer portion of said disc and for directing coins from this area to the outer portion of the surface of said disc to form asingle file of coins thereon, and a series of selectively positioned coin-lifting means, one for each diametrical size of coin, operable on said single file of coins on said outer portion of said disc in cooperativerelation with parts of said disc and the energy imparted to thecoins by said disc to sortably remove the coins therefrom; the combination therewith of a separately distinct storage hopper for the coins to be sorted and a continuously operable conveyor for supplying coins from said hopper to an elevated position, a continuously operable conveyor, running at a higher speed than said first named conveyor and receiving coins therefrom and discharging said coins onto said area of said disc, means adapted to remove coins inwardly adjacent to coins moving along the outer portion of said discs so as to manitain a single-file movement of said outer coins, means for directing the turn of those of said inwardly adjacent coins which are removed radially outward from said disc into said hopper 7. In a denominational value coin sorting machine comprising a rotary disc having a top surface on which coins of different diameters are free to move radially outwardly by centrifugal force induced by said discs rotation, means for limiting the intial movement of the coins on said disc to an area back from the outer portion of said disc and for directing coins from this area to the outer portion of the surface of said disc to form a single file of coins thereon, means for limiting the outward travel of coins on the outer portion of said disc in'their single file movement thereon, a series of selectively positioned coin-lifting means, one for each diametrical size of coins, operable on said single file of coins on said outer portion of said disc in cooperative relation with parts of said disc and the energy imparted to the coins by said disc to sortably remove the coins therefrom, and drive means for said disc; the combination therewith of means for supplying a succession of coins to said area to 7 coins of different diameters are free to move radially outward by centrifugal force induced by said discs rotation, means for directing coins received on the disc into a single file line of coins carried on the outer portion of said disc, and a series of selectively positioned coinlifting means. one for each diametrical size of coin,

of 'said discs so as to maintain single-file movement of said outer coins, means for limiting the outward travel of coins on the outer portion of said disc but permitting the removal from the disc by centrifugal force of superimposed coins from other coins on said disc, and means for directing the return of said removed super-imposed coins and said removed inwardly adjacent coins into said hopper.

9; Ina denominational value coin sorting machine comprising a rotary disc having a top surface on which coins of different diameters are free to move radially outward by centrifugal force induced by said discs rotation, means for directing coins received on said disc and carried outwardly thereby into a single file line of coins carried on the outer portion of said disc, means for limitingthe outward travel of the coins on the outer portion of said disc in their single file movement thereon, and a series of selectively positioned coin-lifting means, one for each diametrical size of coin, operable on said single file of coins on said outer portion of said disc in cooperative relation with parts of said disc with the energy imparted to coins by said disc to sortably remove 5 coins therefrom; the combination therewith of means ineluding a continuously movable conveyor mounted above said disc and having side walls, deflectors mounted on; I

said side Walls adjacent the delivery end of said conveyor for directing coins that may run edgewise along the sides of the conveyor into a flatwise relation with the conveyor.

10. In a denominational value coin sorting machine comprising a rotary disc having a top surface on which coins of different diameters are free to move radially outward by centrifugal force induced by said discs rotation, means for directing coins received on said inner portion of the disc into a single file of coins carried on the outer portion of said disc, means for limiting the outward travel of coins on said outer portion of the disc, a series of selectively positioned coin-liftingmeans, one for each diametrical size of coin, operable on said single file of coins on said outer portion of said disc in cooperative relation With parts of said disc and the energy imparted to the coins by said disc to sortably remove coins therefrom, a drive means for said disc including an electric motor, and a current supply for said motor including a control switch; the combination therewith of means for supplying a succession of coins to the inner portion of the disc, solenoid operated means for preventing the passage of coins from a portion of said disc, and an energizing circuit for the coil of said solenoid rendered operative when said control switch is in its off position.

11. In a denominational value coin sorting machine comprising a rotary disc having a top surface on which coins of different diameters are free to move radially outward by centrifugal force induced by said discs rotation, means for directing coins received on said inner portion of the disc into a single file of coins carried on the outer portion of said disc, means for limiting the outward travel of coins on said outer portion of the disc, a series of selectively positioned coin-lifting means, one for each diametrical size of coin, operable on said single file of coins on said outer portion of said disc in cooperative relation with parts of said disc and the energy imparted to the coins by said disc to sortably remove coins therefrom, a drive means for said disc including an electric motor, a current supply for said motor including a control switch; the combination therewith of means for supplying a succession of coins to the inner portion of the disc, a gate means for preventing passage of coins from a portion of said disc, electrical means for operating said gate means, and a supply circuit for said electrical means including a delayed action relay operable when said control switch is in its off position.

12. In a denominational value coin sorting machine comprising a rotary disc having a top surface on which coins of different diameters are free to move radially outward by centrifugal force induced by said discs rotation, spiral guide means for limiting the initial movement of the coins to an area back from the outer portion of said disc and for directing coins from this area to the outer portion of the surface of said disc to form a single file of coins thereon, a sorting station through which the coins in single file relation on the outer portion of the disc are carried by the disc, said guide means disposed above the disc to leave an open passage area between the outer and inner portions of the disc before the coins reach said sorting station, means for supplying coins to the inner portion of said disc, means for limiting the outward travel of coins on the outer portion of said disc in their single file movement thereon, and a series of selectively positioned coin lifting means, one for each diametrical size of coin, operable on said single file of coins on said outer portion of said disc in cooperative relation with the outward limit means of said disc and the energy imparted to the coins by said disc to sortably remove the coins therefrom; the combination with a separate pickup and coin deflector means positioned in advance of said series of coin lifting means and adapted to act on any coins abutting said single file line of coins as they approach said sorting station.

13. The coin sorting machine defined in claim 4, wherein the means for limiting the outward travel of coins on the outer portion of said disc is attached to said disc for rotational movement in conjunction therewith.

14. The coin sorting machine as defined in claim 4, wherein the means for limiting the outward travel of coins on the outer portionof said disc is attached to stationary frame portions of said coin sorting machine and remains stationary as said disc rotates.

References Cited in the file of this patent V UNITED STATES PATENTS 229,712 Junkin July 6, 1880 1,200,843 Johnson et al. Oct. 10, 1916 1,279,351 Jorgensen et al Sept. 17, 1918 1,346,457 Leja July 13, 1920 1,554,140 Svenson Sept. 15, 1925 1,813,296 Kidwell July 7, 1931 1,905,477 Luce Apr. 25, 1933 1,965,373 Fitzgerald July 3, 1934 1,979,659 Zierick Nov. 6, 1934 2,152,952 Brandt et al. Apr. 4, 1939 2,432,010 Halfpap Dec. 2, 1947 2,581,074 Buchholz et al Jan. 1, 1952 2,763,400 Francis Sept. 18, 1956 FOREIGN PATENTS 1,075,477 France July 28, 1954 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE CERTIFICATE OF CORRECTION Patent No 2,977.961 April 4 1961 Arnold R. Buchholz et a1.

It is hereby certified that error appears in the above numbered patent requiring correction and that the said Letters Patent should read as corrected below.-

Column 5, line 54, for "including" read includes --=5 column 7, line 42 for "What is claimed in" read What we claim as column 9, line 57, for "coins", first occurrence, read coin column 10, line 8 for "areas"- read top surface Signed and sealed this 12th day of September 1961.

(SEAL) Attest: a

. ERNEST W. SWIDER DAVID L. LADD Commissioner of Patents Attesting Officer USCOM M-DC

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Classifications
U.S. Classification453/6
International ClassificationG07D3/12, G07D3/00, G07D9/00
Cooperative ClassificationG07D3/128, G07D9/008
European ClassificationG07D9/00F, G07D3/12D