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Publication numberUS2978086 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 4, 1961
Filing dateOct 14, 1959
Priority dateOct 14, 1959
Also published asDE1220869B, DE1561229A1, DE1561229B2, US3302764, US3302765
Publication numberUS 2978086 A, US 2978086A, US-A-2978086, US2978086 A, US2978086A
InventorsJohn E Hickerson
Original AssigneeIbm
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Key operated machines
US 2978086 A
Abstract  available in
Images(7)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

A ril 4, 1961 J. E. HICKERSON KEY OPERATED MACHINES 7 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed Oct. 14, 1959 INVENTOR.

JOHN E. HICKERSON 4? 6.21M BY wow.

April 1961 J. E. HICKERSON 2,978,086

KEY OPERATED MACHINES Filed Oct. 14, 1959 '7 Sheets-Sheet 2 April 4, 1961 J. E. HICKERSON KEY OPERATED MACHINES Filed Oct. 14, 1959 7 Sheets-Sheet 3 APrll 1961 J. E. HICKERSON KEY OPERATED MACHINES 7 Sheets-Sheet 4 Filed Oct. 14, 1959 as: as: m I

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KEY OPERATED MACHINES Filed Oct. 14, 1959 i 1 F lG.61

411-2 I 411-1 -5 48-6 48-4 411-5 CLUTCH g F5000 51 145 s 7 Sheets-Sheet 5 FIG. 7

STOP PIN 0 SPACE 01111 110 April 4, 1961 J. E. HICKERSON KEY OPERATED MACHINES 7 Sheets-Sheet 6 Filed Oct. 14, 1959 April 1961 J. E. HICKERSON 2,978,036

KEY OPERATED MACHINES Filed Oct. 14, 1959 FIG.9

7 Sheets-Sheet 7 openings at one of the points.

2,978,086 KEY OPERATED MACHINES John E. Hickerson, Lexington, Ky., assignor to International Business Machines N.Y., a corporation of New York This invention relates to key operated machines, such as typewriters and punches, and pore particularly to keyboard mechanisms for operating such machines.

A very simple and inexpensive keyboard for a key operated machine may comprise a number of thin strips or tapes which are movable longitudinally from inactive positions to active positions in response to the actuation of a key. The strips are arranged side by side and are provided at different points along their lengths with openings through which stop pins may be inserted. The openings at each point are aligned with each other at their ends adjacent the active positions so that a released pin may pass through all of the strips. Some of openings at each point may be only large enough to'receive the pin which then operates to hold strips having such openings against movement. Other openings at each point may be long enough to permit movement of strips to their ac tive positions after a stop pin has been inserted through them. Each of the stop pins is normally latched in a position free of the strips, and a key element is provided for freeing each pin so it may be moved through aligned The strips are yieldingly urged toward their active positions after one of the stop pins is released, and those strips which move since they have long openingsreceiving the released pin, are representative of the character assigned to the key which is actuated for releasing the stop pin. Movement of strips to their active positions may result in the closing of contacts for effecting the operation of mechanisms to print the character, to punch holes representative of the character, or to perform some other useful function. If desired, the strips may be connected to some other operating mechanism mechanically instead of by electrical circuits.

An object of this invention is to provide an improved key operated machine.

Another object is to provide an improved keyboard for a machine which is operative to produce a function representative of an actuated key.

Yet another object is to provide a key operated machine having an improved keyboard which is operative on actuation of a key to close electrical contacts in difierent combinations representative of the key actuated.

Still another object is to provide an improved key operated machine having a keyboard containing parts which move in different combinations dependent upon the key actuated, and means operating in response to the movement of such parts for producing a function representative of the actuated key.

Another object is to provide an improved typewriter.

Yet another object is to provide an improved key operated punch. 7

Other objects of the invention will be pointed out in Corporation, New York,

States Pate the following description and claims and illustrated in the accompanying drawings, which disclose, by way of ex- In the drawings:

Fig. 1 is a schematic view of an improved keyboard,

with parts broken away, adapted for use with a mechanism which operates to produce functions representative of actuated keys.

Fig. 2 is a schematic view of a mechanism which operates under control of the keyboard shown in Fig. 1 for positioning a single element type head and effecting printing of characters corresponding to keys actuated.

Fig. 3 is a plan view of a portion of the mechanism shown in Fig. 2.

Fig. 4 shows the openings in the keyboard strips when the latter are in their inactive positions.

Fig. 5 is a chart showing the location of characters on the type head of Fig. 2.

Fig. 6 is a wiring diagram showing the connections between the keyboard and the print mechanism of Fig. 2.

Fig. 7 is a timing diagram of the keyboard and print mechanism when connected to operate as a' typewriter.

Fig. 8 is a perspective view, with parts shown in section, of a punch mechanism adapted to be operated by the keyboard of Fig. l.

Fig. 9 is a wiring diagram showing the connections between the keyboard and the punch mechanism of Fig. 8.

Fig. 10 is a perspective view of a punch mechanism like that of Fig. 8 but having punch pins controlled directly by strips in the keyboard.

Referring to Fig. 1 it will be noted that there is shown an improved keyboard having a plurality of key buttons 1 representing various characters. Each button is mounted upon a key element 2 in the form of a thin strip of spring metal which changes its efiective length when the button is depressed. The front ends of the strips are clamped to a plate 3 by a bar 4-, and their rear ends extend loosely under a guide plate 5 and slidably engage the surface of the'plate 3. If desired, the elements 2 and a connecting portion at their front ends, in place of the'bar 4, may be stamped from a single sheet of metal or in several convenient sections, as desired. The portions of the elements 2 supporting the buttons may then be bowed as shown, and the connecting portion be attached to the plate 3 by any suitable means.

At the rear edge of the plate 3 are stop pins 6 arranged in alignment with the key elements 2 and havingelongated slots 8 through which a rod 9 extends to guide them for vertical movement. Formed on each of the stop pins is a tooth 11 engageable with a shoulder 12 on the rear edge of plate 3 for latching the pins in raised positions against the action of springs 14. The lower end of each stop pin is provided with a reduced portion 15 normally extending a short distance into an opening 16 formed in a channel-shaped guide member 18. Arranged within the guide member are thin elongated strips 19 having, at different points along their lengths, either openings 29 which are just large enough to receive the reduced portions 15 of the stop pins or openings 21 whichare long enough to permit substantial movement of the strips when pin portions 15 extend through them. At the right hand ends of the strips are slots 22 receiving a pin 23 fixed to a lever 24 supported at one end by a pivot pin 25. The opposite end of the lever is normally engaged by a latch 26 which holds it against swinging in a clockwise direction. The left hand ends of the strips are connected to springs 28 which urge them to the left against the pin 23. With the strips 19 held in the positions shown, the openings 20 and the left hand portions of the openings 21 are located under the reduced portions 15 of the various stop pins 6. 1 i

When one of the key buttons is depressed, the rear end of the strip 2 on which it is mounted slides over the plate 3 into engagement with the stop pin aligned therewith. Arranged under the buttons is a rod 29 which limits the depression of each button at a point in which Patented Apr. 4, i961 its element 2 is extended sufiiciently for moving the upper end of a pin rearwardly until the tooth 11 is free of the shoulder 12, thereby permitting movement of the stop pin downwardly under the action of the spring 14. EX- tending along the rear edges of the stop pins is a channel member 30 having notches 31 adapted to receive the edges of the stop pins when moved rearwardly. Loosely contained within the member 30 are cylindrical elements 32 which move relative to each other longitudinally of the channel. The total clearance between the elements is such that only one of the stop pins may be moved at a time into a slot 31. As a pin enters one of the slots, the elements 32 are cammed lengthwise of the channel and block the slots against entrance by the other pins. This prevents the depression of more than one button at a time to release a stop pin. If desired, the channel member 30 may be located at the lower ends of the stop pins to permit an unlatching of the latter but allowing only one at a time to move downwardly to its operative position. With this arrangement, a second pin may be unlatched before printing under control of the first pin is completed. The second pin then becomes efiective immediately upon completion of the first printing operation. As an unlatched pin moves downwardly, its reduced portion passes through all of the strip openings and 21 lying beneath it.

Projecting from the rear edge of each stop pin is a finger portion 35 which engages a bail 36 having arms 37 and 38 at its opposite ends pivotally supported on a rod 39. The arm 38 has a projecting portion connected by a link 41 to the latch 26 for swinging the latter in a direction to release the lever 24 when the bail 36 is rocked downwardly. A spring 42 normally holds the latch in a position to engage the lever 24. The bail arms 37, 38 extend rearwardly of the pivot rod 39 and have flange portions 44 which are attracted to electromagnets 45 when the latter are energized. The arrangement is such that an energizing of the electromagnets 45 rocks the bail 36 in a counterclockwise direction. Any stop pin 6 in a lower position is lifted by the bail engaging the finger portion 35. Lifting of the stop pin is sufficient to re-engage the tooth 11 with the shoulder 12 on the plate 3. It will be seen that the action of the bail and the spring 14 on the stop pin is such as to pivot the latter about the shaft 9 in a direction to force the tooth 11 over the shoulder 12 when the pin is lifted to latching position. If a pin is lifted while its key element 2 is extended by holding the button depressed, the end of the element may be engaged by the top of the pin but it flexes sufliciently to permit a relatching of the pin. Simultaneously with the lifting of a stop pin, the latch 26 is pivoted by the bail to a position for latching the lever 24 when it is returned to the position shown in Fig. 1.

When any stop pin is moved downwardly after it is released from the shoulder 12 by depression of a key button 1, the finger portion 35 on the pin rocks the bail 36 and the pin portion 15 passes through openings 20 and 21 in the strips 19. Rocking of the bail effects a disengagement of the latch 26 from the lever 24 so it may swing and permit movement of the strips 19 under the action of the springs 28. Those strips having long openings 21 receiving the portion 15 of the released pin will move to the left while the strips having short openings 20 at this point will be held against movement. Projecting from one side of each strip is a fiange portion 47 engageable with a pair of contacts 48 for closing the latter when the strip is moved by its spring 28. As shown herein, there are six strips 19 and six pairs of contacts 48 which may be closed singly or in any combination de pending upon which of the strips are permitted to move. It will be appreciated that more or less strips and contacts may be provided depending upon the mechanism to be controlled thereby.

For returning the strips to positions in which another stop pin may be extended through aligned openings, the lever 24 is provided with a flange 50 which maybe attracted to an electromagnet 51 when energized. This causes the lever to swing in a counterclockwise direction I and move the pin 23 against the strips causing them to move with the lever to a position in which it is latched. At the rear end of the bail arm 37 is a pair of contacts 52 which are closed by the arm on a rocking of the bail by a released stop pin 6. These contacts are connected in a control circuit which will be described later.

There is shown in Fig. 2 a mechanism which operates on closing the pairs of contacts 48 and 52 in Fig. 1 for actuating a single element type head 55 to print a character corresponding to that of the button 1 which has been actuated. The head may be rotated and tilted from a home position to present any one of various type elements in a position for printing characters on a record sheet supported by a platen 56. The mechanism for rotating and tilting the head may be like that shown by the Hickerson et al. Patent No. 2,895,584. As disclosed by this patent, a pulley 57 is rotated different amounts to effect a tilting of the head for printing from type elements in any one of four rows surrounding the head. Another pulley 58 is operated to rotate the type head for presenting any one of the vertical rows of type elements to the platen.

The type head 55 has on its surface at one side of a plane including the head axis, type elements designed to print lower case characters. At the opposite side of the head are elements designed to print upper case characters. As shown by Fig. 5, there are eleven vertical rows of lower case characters and the same number of rows of upper case characters. Normally, the head prints from the lower case type elements, and the home position during this time is that which effects a typing from the element at the top of the middle row, this being the letter 2. For upper case typing, the head is rotated 180 and operates from a home position in which it prints the letter E. Other characters are selected by rotating the head in either direction from home posi tion one to five unit spaces and tilting it one to three unit spaces.

For rotating the type head, there is provided an endless tape 60 which is wrapped around the pulley 58 and then extended about pulleys 61 and 62 mounted on levers 63 and 64 supported by pivot pins 65 and 66. In order to effect a rotation of the pulley 58 by swinging the levers 63 and 64, it is necessary that the tape 60 be held at some point against movement. This is accomplished by connecting the tape at 68 to a member 69 slidably mounted on a rod 70. Another tape 71 is connected at 72 to the member 69 and is extended about pulleys 73 and 74 mounted on lever 75, 76 which are connected together by a link 77. Tape 71 is also connected at 78 to a carrier 80 which is slidably mounted on a rod 81 and has the type head 55 mounted thereon. Actually, the type head is carried by a post 82 fixed to a frame 83 which is pivotally supported by trunnions 85 on the carrier 80. After the head is rotated and tilted to its proper printing position, the frame 83 is rocked on the trunnions 85 to engage the head with the platen 56. During the operation of the type head to print lower case characters, the lever 75 is held by a spring 87 in engagement with a stop 88. At this time, the lever 76 is in a position free of a stop 89. Associated with the lever 76 is a solenoid 90 which may be energized for moving the lever against the stop 89. When this happens, the lever 75 swings to the right with the lever 76 due to the connecting rod 77, and, since the carrier 80 is held against movement at this time by means to be described shortly, the tape 71 operates to slide the member 69 to the right along the rod 70. This causes the tape 60 to be driven due to its connection to the member 69, and to drive with it the pulley 58 for rotating the type head to a position from which it operates to print upper case characters.

In order to rotate the type head in either direction one to five space units from a home position, there are provided means for swinging the levers 63 and 64 simultaneously in the same direction varying distances. This means comprises a pair of tapes 92a and 92b connected at one end to the levers 63, 64 and extending about stationary pulleys 93a, 93b and movable pulleys 94a and 94b, 95a and 95b, and 96a and 96b. The pulleys 94a, 94b are mounted on a bar 97 while the pulleys 95a, 95b and 96a, 96b are mounted on similar bars 98 and 99. The other ends of the tapes 92a, 9212 are connected to a bar 100 for movement therewith. Each of the bars 97 to 100 has slots 101 formed in its ends for slidably receiving supporting rods 102. The upper and lower edges of the bars adjacent their ends are slidably res ceived within notches formed in guide members 103. The mid portion of each bar is cut away at 104 to receive a shaft 106 and to permitrmovement of the bar longitudinally relative to the shaft. Fixed to the shaft adjacent the bars are cams 107, 108, 109 and 110, each cam acting on a roller '112 supported by the bar associated therewith. With the shaft 106 in its normal position, a high point on each cam is in position to be engaged by its roller 112. At the end of each bar on the side of the cam opposite the roller is a spring 114 contreated between the bar and the guide member 103. Associated with each bar is a. latch member 115 engageable with a shoulder on the bar for holding it against movement by the spring 114. If the latch member'is moved out of engagement with the shoulder, the spring 114 moves the bar to maintain engagement between the roller 112 and its associated cam. A single rotation of the shaft 106 then results in a reciprocation of the unlatched bar.

As shown by Figs. 2 and 3, the bar 97 is urged to the left by the spring 114 while the bars 98, 99 and 100 are urged to the right. Associated with the latches 115 for the bars 97 to-100 are electromagnets 117, 118, 119 and 120 which operate when energized to disengage their latches 115 from the bars against the action of springs 121. The cam 107 is so shaped that it permits a movement of the bar 97 to the left a distance required to actuate the tapes 92a, 92b for rotating the type head two unit spaces. It will be seen that the tapes pass around the pulleys 94a, 94b in such a manner that movement of the bar to the left results in an increase in the effective length of tape 92a and a decrease in the effective length of tape 92b. The tapes operate to swing the levers 63, 64 in a clockwise direction and actuate the tape 60 to rotate the type head in the same direction.

This is possible since the rear section of tape 60 is held against movement by its connection to member 69 As the bar 97 is returned by the cam'107 to its latched position, the type head is rotated counterclockwise to its home position.

Tapes 92a and 92b pass around pulleys 95a, 95b in such a manner that movement of bar 98 to the right causes rotation of the type head in a clockwise direction. Cam 108 is formed to permit movement of the bar 98 a distance required for rotating the type head two unit spaces. Movement of the bar 99 to the right causes the effective lengths of tapes 92a, 92b to be decreased and increased respectively for rotating the type head in a counterclockwise direction. Cam 109 is shaped to effect movement of the bar 99 a distance required to rotate the head five unitspaces. Movement of the bar 100 to the right operates to rotate the type head in a clockwise direction, and the cam 110 is shaped to effect a movement-of the bar for rotating the head 'only one 7 unit space. It will be seen that rotation of the head one to five units in a clockwise direction may be accomplished by unlatching the bars 97, 98 and 99 singly or in combination for movement under control of their respective cams. Rotation of five units in a counterclocknotepad s wise direction may be accomplished by unlatching bar 99, and rotation of one to four units in a counterclockwise direction may be obtained by unlatching bar 99 in combination with one or more of bars 97, 98 and 100.

Tilting of the type head is accomplished by actuating an endless tape wrapped around the pulley 57 and then passing in opposite directions around pulleys 126, 127 carried by levers 128, 129 mounted on the pivot pins 65, 66. From these pulleys it passes rearwardly around guide pulleys 130, 131 and is wrapped about a pulley 132 fixed to an escapement ratchet 133. A spring 134 tends to rotate the ratchet in a clockwise direction, and a dog 135 normally engages the ratchet teeth for holding it against such movement. Upon swinging the levers 128, 129, the front portion of the tape 125 operates to rotate the pulley 57 since the rear tape portion is held against movement by the escapement pulley 132.

Swinging of the levers 128, 129 to produce a tilting of the head is accomplished by moving tapes 137, 138 which are connected at one end to the levers and then pass around pulleys 139a, 13% on a bar 140 and are connected at their opposite ends to a bar 141. The bars 140, 141 are like the bars 97 to 100 and are moved longitudinally by springs 114 under the control of cams 142, 143 mounted on shaft 106. As shown in Fig. 3, bar 140 is moved to the left by its spring 114 under the control of cam 142, and bar 141 is moved to the right under control of cam 143. The shapes of the cams are such as to permit movement of the bars 140, 141 so as to effect a tilting of the head two unit spaces and one unit space respectively. Movement of both bars results in a tilting of the head three unit spaces. Latches 115 normally hold the bars 140, 141 against movement, and these may be released by energizing electromagnets 145, 146.

As soon as the type head is operated to print a character, the carrier 80 is moved to the right one letter space so the head will be in position to print the next character. Escapernent of the head is obtained by wrapping a tape 148 around the ratchet pulley 132 and then passing it in opposite directions around guide pulleys 149, 150 and through an opening in a projecting portion 151 on the carrier 80. A screw 152 on the projection 151 engages the tape for clamping it to the carrier. When the dog 135 is disengaged from the ratchet wheel, the spring 134 drives the wheel and the pulley 132 in a clockwise direction. The tape 148 is moved by the escapement pulley in a direction to advance the carrier 80 and the type head to the-right along the platen. At the same time, the tape 125 is driven by the pulley 132 an equal distance in the same direction so that no tilting of the head takes place. As the carrier moves, the tape 71,moves with it due to the connection 78 and causes the member 69 to slide in the opposite direction an equal distance. Since the tape 66) is connected to the member 69, it will move with the carrier and prevent any rotation of the type head during escapement.

For driving the various parts of the print mechanism, there is provided a motor 155 which operates continuously to drive a pulley 156 in the direction indicated. This pulley is connected through a clutch 157 to a shaft 158 trol arm 159 is retracted by .energizing a magnet 160.

The clutch 157 may comprise a helical spring surround-* ing a hub on the pulley 156 and an end portion of the shaft 158. The spring frictionally engages the hub and shaft when released and tends to grip them tightly when its ends turn relative to each other on picking up the load on the shaft. Fixed to one end of the spring is a sleeve 151 loosely mounted on the hub of the pulley and having a shoulder engageable with the arm 159. The other end of the spring is attached to a sleeve 1'62 fixed on the shaft 158 and having a shoulder engageable by a spring urged dog 163, as shown. With the arm and the dog engaging the shoulders, the clutch spring is held free of the pulley hub and the shaft 158. When the am 159 is retracted by the magnet 160, the clutch spring locks the shaft to the pulley to be driven by the latter. If the magnet is immediately de-energized, the arm 159 engages the shoulder on the sleeve 161 at the end of one revolution and holds one end of the clutch spring. The shaft 158 turns some due to inertia and causes the sleeve 162 to turn to a position permitting the dog 163 to drop behind its shoulder. The clutch spring is unwound during this time and is held in such condition by the dog 163 and the arm 159.

Driving connections are provided from the shaft 158 .to the shaft 106 through bevel gears 165, shaft 166, bevel gears 167, shaft 168 and bevel gems 169. For swinging the type head into engagement with the platen, there is provided on the shaft 158 a cam 17. engaged by a spring urged follower 171 which is fixed to a rod 172 carrying a plate 173 which acts as a bail. Extending from the frame 83 supporting the type head are arms 174 in positions to be engaged by the bail plate 173 when the rod 172 is rocked by engagement of its follower with the cam 170. The arms 174 are normally held in engagement with the plate 173 by a spring 175.

For each revolution of the shaft 158, the escapement dog 135 is actuated to permit a turning of the ratchet wheel 133 one tooth in a clockwise direction. To accomplish this, a cam 178 on the shaft 158 is engaged by a follower 179 under the action of a spring 180. A link 181 is connected at one end to a crank arm on the follower and is connected at its other end to a bellcrank 182 pivotally supported on a pin 183. Another arm of the bellcrank is connected by a link 184 to a member 185 pivotally supported at 186 and having an arm acting on an interposer 188. Formed in ,the interposer is an elongated slot 189 receiving a pin 190, and a spring 191 normally holds the interposer in a position with the pin engaging the right end of the slot, as shown. Projecting downwardly from the side of the interposer is a flange 192 engageable with one side of the dog 135 at its right end. Formed in the dog is a slot 194 receiving the pin 190 to permit both longitudinal and angular motion of the dog relative to the pin. When a tooth on the ratchet wheel engages the dog, the spring 134 rotates the wheel and forces the dog with it until the left end of the slot 194 engages the pin 190. If the interposer 188 is then rocked in a clockwise direction, the flange 192 acts on the dog to rock it out of engagement with the ratchet wheel. Extending from the dog is an arm 196 to which a spring 197 is connected for moving the dog longitudinally and, at the same time, urging it in a counterclockwise direction. As soon as the dog is disengaged from the ratchet wheel, the spring 197 moves it longitudinally until its right end is clear of the flange 192 on the interposer and then swings it into engagement with the ratchet wheel. The operation is such that the ratchet wheel is permitted to rotate one tooth on each actuation of the As mentioned above, there are six strips 19 which operate in response to the actuation of key buttons 1 for closing contacts 48. Figure 4 shows the openings and 21 formed in the strips at each character position, and each strip has been designated according to the function of the type head obtained by movement of the strip. The two top strips have been designated T1 and T2 indicating a tilting of the head one and two space units, re spectively, in response to their movement. The other strips htve been marked to indicate unit distances of rotation in a positive (clockwise) or negative (counterclockwise) direction. The contacts 48 for the strips reading from top to bottom in Fig. 4 have been designated 18-1 to 43-6 and have been shown in the wiring diagram of Fig. 6 connected to the magnets controlling operation of the cam actuated bars in Figs. .2 and 3. It will be noted in Fig. 3 that the cam actuated bars are designated T or R for tilt or rotate, and a number is employed with the letter to indicate the units of movement. The

wiring diagram shows that the contacts 48-1 for strip T1 are connected to the magnet 146 which controls movement of bar T1. Contacts 48-2 associated with strip T2 are connected to magnet 145 controlling bar T2. In the same manner, contacts 48-3 to 48-6 are connected to magnets for bars R1, R2 and R5. Mounted on the shaft 106 are cams which operate to close contacts CB-l, CB-Z and CB-S. One side of the contacts 48-1 to 48-6 is connected through the contacts CB-1 to one side of a power source when a switch 198 is closed, and one of the magnets 117 to 120, 145 and 146 is connected through a conductor 19? to the other side of the power source.

As one of the stop pins 6 drops in response to the actuation of a key button, the bail 36 rocks and closes the contacts 52 which are connected, as shown in Fig. 6, to the clutch magnet 160. Downward movement of the bail also causes the latch 26 to be disengaged from the lever 24 so the strips 19 can move to the left if they are not held by the released stop .pin. With the magnet 169 energized, the shaft 106 is driven and closes contacts (18-1 to complete circuits through contacts 48 closed by the strips, and their respective selection magnets 117 to 120, 145 and 146. Soon after these magnets are energized, the bar cams permit movement of the released bars for actuating the tapes to rotate or tilt the type head. Referring to Fig. 4, it will be noted that an actuation of the button for the letter A results in movement of the strip T2. This closes the contacts 48-2 to energize magnet 145 for releasing bar 140 which moves under control of cam 142 for tilting the type head two space units. Fig. 5 indicates that a tilting of the head two units from home position presents either a or A depending on whether the head has been positioned for lower or upper caseprinting. From Figs. 4 or 5 it can be determined what degree of tilting or rotation is necessary to position any character for printing.

As soon as the selection bars have started moving from their latched positions, the strips 19 may be returned to their inoperative positions. This is accomplished by completing a circuit from one side of the power source through cam contacts CB-3 and the electromagnet 51 to the other side of the power source. At approximately the same time, another circuit is completed through the cam contacts CB-Z and the electromagnets 45 for rocking the bail 36 in a direction to restore the released pin 6 to its latched position. The rocking of the bail 36 also results in a movement of the latch 26 to a position for engaging the lever 24 as soon as it has restored the strips 19. After the selection bars have operated to position the type head, the cam 1'70 effects a turning of the rod 172 for swinging the type head against the platen to print the selected character. Soon after this, the cam 178 actuates the escapement dog 135 to effect movement of the carrier for positioning the type head in the next printing position.

For rotating the type head to a position from which it operates to type upper case characters, the lever 76 is swung into engagement with the stop 89, :as described above. Swinging of the lever 76 is accomplished by connecting the solenoid in a circuit extending from one side of the power source through contacts 200 to the other side of the power source. The contacts 200 are closed by depressing a key button 201, as shown in Fig. 1. When this button is released, the levers 75, 76 swing to the left under the action of spring 87 and return the head to its lower case printing position.

In Fig. 8 there is shown a punch mechanism which operates in response to an actuation of the keyboard shown in Fig. 1. This mechanism includes a plurality of punch pins 205 which are received within openings formed in a block 206 and extend from the bottom of a recess 207 in the block through the latter to its lower side. A spring 208 surrounds each of the pins and acts between the bottom of the recess and a pin collar .209 for holding the latter normally in engagement with a 9 plate 210 attached to the top of the block and lying over the recess 207. The block is slidably mounted on bolts 212 threaded at one end into openings in a stationary plate 214, and springs 215 act betweenthe plate 214 and the plate 210 on the block for urging the latter toward the head ends of the bolts. Slidably mounted on the bolts between their head ends and the block 206 is a die plate 216 having openings 217 for receiving the punch pins 205 when the die is moved upwardly relative to the pins. Between the block 206 and the die plate are washers 218 for holding them apart slightly so a tape or card to be punched may be inserted between them.

Formed in the stationary plate 214 are openings 220 for receiving the upper end portions of the punch pins if the latter are permitted to move upwardly with the block 206. At the lower side of the plate 214 are L shaped interposers 221 pivotally connected to the plate at 222. It will be noted that six punch pins have been shown, and one interposer is provided for each pin. Any number of punch pins may be used, and six have been shown herein only because the keyboard of Fig. 1 was shown with this number of strips. Each interposer has one of its ends cooperating with one of the openings 220 in the plate 214. Normally, each interposer is held by a spring 224 in engagement with a stop 225, and, at this time, the end of the interposer is clear of the opening 220 but lies closely adjacent thereto. Associated with the opposite ends of the interposers are electromagnets 226 Which may be energized for swinging the interposers about the pivots ,222 so their other ends move under the openings 220. 7

When an interposer lies under one of the-openings 220 during upward movement of the block 206, the punch pin alignedwith the openings engages the interposer and is held against movement with the block. As the die plate 216 is moved upwardly with the block, those pins held by interposers are forced through the openings 217.-

A tape or card located between the block 206 and the die plate at this time will have holes punched in it. As shown by the wiring diagram of Fig. 9, the contacts 48 controlled by the strips 19 of the keyboard are connected to the electromagnets 226 to effect a punching of holes representative of the character assigned to the key button which is actuated.

For moving the block 206 and the die plate upwardly, there is attached to each end of the'die plate member 228 having an opening 229 through which a shaft 230 extends. Fixed to the shaft 230 are eccentric cams 231 which are received within the openings 229 and act on their upper surfaces for lifting the die plate as the shaft rotates. A clutch 233 like that described above in connection with the mechanism of Fig. 2, operates on energizing an electromagnet 234. for transmitting drive from a pulley 235 to the, shaft 230 The electromagnet 234 is energized under control of the contacts 52 which; are closed on each actuation of a key button 1. Mounted on the shaft 230 are cams actuating contacts CB4, CB2, and CB-3 in the same manner as in Fig. 2. The

contacts CB-l are connected at one side to the positivev side of the power source and are connected at their other side through the strip controlled contacts 48 and the electromagnets 226 to the negative side of the power source. Contacts CB-2 and CB-3 control the connection of electromagnets 45 and 51, respectively, across the power source the same as they did when the mechanism of Fig. 2 was controlled by the keyboard.

In Fig. 10 there is shown a punch mechanism like that of Fig. 8 except that'the strips 19 of the keyboard are provided at one end with projecting portions 238 which are movable between the openings in the plate 214 and the upperends of the punch pins 205. It will be appreciated that the strips perform the functions of the interposers 221 in Fig. 8, and the circuitry including the contacts 48, the electromagnets 226 and the contacts CB-l may be dispensed with. While the strips control the operation of the punch mechanism shown in Fig. 8, they amass 10. may also operate contacts nism like that of Fig. 2 or another punch mechanism as shown by Fig. 8.

While there have been shown and described and pointed out the fundamental novel features of the invention, as applied to a preferred embodiment and modifications thereof, it will be understood that it may be modified and embodied in various other forms without departing from the spirit of the invention. It is the intention to be limited only as indicated by the scope of the following claims.

What is claimed is:

1. A key operated machine comprising, in combination, a plurality of key buttons operable manually for causing different machine functions, a stop member asso ciated with each of said key buttons, a plurality of thin strips arranged closely adjacent each other and movable longitudinally between inoperative and operative positions, openings in said strips in alignment with each other at points opposite said stop members when said strips are in their inoperative positions, said openings adapted to receive said stop members and being of such length that each of said strips is either held by a stop member against movement or is permitted to move to its operative position, means yieldingly urging said strips toward their operative positions, means releasably holding said strips in their inoperative positions, means operating on actuation of any one of said key' buttons for moving its associated stop member through the openings opposite it in said strips and for releasing said holding means, and means operating in response to movement of said strips to operative positions for producing a function representative of the key button actuated.

2. The machine of claim 1 including means actuated at a predetermined time during the operation of said last mentioned operating means for removing any stop member' from openings in said strips and returning the latter to their inoperative positions.

3. The machine of claim 1 in which said last mentioned means operates to print a character corresponding to the key button actuated, said means including a single 7 element type head having characters at different points on its surface, a platen, means for positioning said head to present a selected character opposite said platen, said last mentioned means including members movable from normal positions and each operating during such move ment to shift said head a predetermined distance, latches for holding said members in their normal positions, magnets operating when energized for releasing said latches, means including contacts closed by said strips when moved to their operative positions for energizing said magnets, and means operating after said print head has been positioned for moving it into engagement with said platen.

4. The machine of claim 1 in which said last mentioned means operates to punch holes representative of a character corresponding to the key button actuated, said means including punch elements, a die having openings through which said punch elements may be moved to efiect a punching operation, interposers movable to positions for making said punch elements effective, magnets operating when energized to move said interposers to said positions, 'means including contacts closed by said strips when moved to their operative positions for energizing said magnets, and means operating after said interposers have been moved by an energizing of said magnets for effecting a movement of the corresponding punch elements through said die openings.

5. The machine of claim 1 in which said last mentioned means operates to punch holes representative of a character corresponding to the key button actuated, said means including punch elements, a projecting portion on each of said strips cooperating with a different one of said punch elements, said projecting portions acting on said punch elements to make the latter effectivewhen said strips are moved to their operative positions, and

48 for either a printing mecha- I aovaose means operating after said strips have been moved for actuating said eifective punch elements.

6. A key operated machine comprising, in combination, a plurality of key buttons operable manually for causing different machine functions, a stop pin associated with each of said key buttons and movable between operative and inoperative positions, means for latching said stop pins normally in their inoperative positions, means operating on actuation of each of said key buttons for releasing the stop pin associated therewith from said latching means, means yieldingly urging said stop pins toward their operative positions, a plurality of thin strips arranged closely adjacent each other and movable longitudinally between inoperative and operative positions, openings in said strips in alignment with each other at points opposite said stop pins when said strips are in their inoperative positions, said openings adapted to receive said stop pins when moved to their operative positions and being of such length that each of said strips is either held by a stop pin against movement longitudinally or is permitted to move to its operative position, means yieldingly urging said strips toward their operative positions, means releasably holding said strips in their inoperative positions, means including a bail which is arranged for actuation in one direction by a released stop pin to effect a release of said holding means, and means operating in response to the movement of any of said strips to their operative positions for producing a function representative of the key button actuated.

7. The machine of claim 6 including a first electromagnet which is operable when energized for returning said strips to their inoperative positions, a second elecromagnet which is operable when enegized for rocking said bail in the opposite direction to return any released stop pin to its latched position, and means effective at predetermined times during the operation of said last mentioned operating means for energizing said first and second electromagnets.

8. The machinee of claim 6 in which said means for releasing said stop pins from said latching means comprises thin strips of spring metal supporting said key buttons and acting against said stop pins, said spring strips changing their eifective lengths on actuation of said buttons and moving said stop pins to release them from said latching means.

9. The machine of, claim 4 in which said means for releasing said stop pins from said latching means comprises thin bowed strips of spring metal, means for holding one end of said bowed strips against movement, and means slidably supporting the other ends of said bowed strips for movement into engagement with said stop pins, said bowed strips changing their effective lengths on actuation of said key buttons and moving said stop pins to release them from said latching means.

10. A key operated machine comprising, in combination, a plurality of key buttons operable manually for causing different machine functions, a stop member associated with each of said key buttons, a plurality of thin strips arranged closely adjacent each other and movable longitudinally between inoperative and operative positions, openings in said strips in alignment with each other at points opposite said stop members when said strips are in their inoperative positions, said openings adapted to receive said stop members and being of such length that each of said strips is either held by a stop member against movement or is permitted to move to its operative position, means yieldingly urging said strips toward their operative positions, means releasably holding said strips in their inoperative positions, means operating on actuation of any one of said key buttons for moving its associated stop member through openings opposite it in said strips, means actuated by said stop members during movement through said openings for releasing said holding means, a continuously operating motor, a rotatable shaft, a clutch mechanism operable when engaged for connecting said shaft to said motor to be driven thereby one revolution, means operable on movement of any one of said stop members through openings in said strips for engaging said clutch mechanism, a plurality of operating members movable between first and second positions, latch elements normally holding said operating members in said first positions, electromagnets operating when energized to disengage said latch elements from said operating members, means including contacts closed by said strips when moved to their operative positions for separately energizing said electromagnets, means including cams fixed to said shaft for effecting movement of unlatched operating members to their second positions and back, a print head having characters at different points on its surface corresponding to said key buttons, a platen, means driven by said operating members for shifting said print head to present a character to said platen corresponding to any actuated one of said key buttons, and means including a cam driven with said shaft for engaging said print head with said platen when said operating members have been moved to their second positions.

11. The machine of claim 10 including a first means controlled by said shaft for returning said strips to their inoperative positions, and second means controlled by said shaft for removing any of said stop members from openings in said strips.

12. The machine of claim 10 additionally comprising means including a cam driven with said shaft for moving said print head after engagement with said platen to a different print position along said platen.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS

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Referenced by
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Classifications
U.S. Classification400/164.2, 400/336.1, 400/162.1, 400/330, 400/154.2, 400/161.1, 400/70, 400/705.3, 400/335, 400/666, 234/103, 400/496, 400/478
International ClassificationB41J7/32, B41J3/50, B41J7/60, G09C3/00, B41J7/64, H04L17/26
Cooperative ClassificationB41J7/32, B41J7/64, H04L17/26, B41J3/50, B41J7/60
European ClassificationB41J7/32, B41J3/50, B41J7/64, B41J7/60, H04L17/26