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Publication numberUS2979465 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 11, 1961
Filing dateDec 23, 1958
Priority dateDec 23, 1958
Publication numberUS 2979465 A, US 2979465A, US-A-2979465, US2979465 A, US2979465A
InventorsEdward W Lang, John J Parran, David D Whyte
Original AssigneeProcter & Gamble
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Cream shampoo
US 2979465 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

CREAM SHAMPOO Filed Dec. 23, 1958, sr. No. 782,505

12 Claims. c1. zsa -m This invention relates to opaque shampoos formulated with synthetic detergents and substantially free of fatty acid soaps. t

Cream shampoos or cream paste shampoos, which are thickened and made opaque by suspended solids, are preferred by many users because of their plastic consistency and their cosmetic appearance. Problems of (l) maintaining a uniform consistency over a range of temperature, (2) stability of the suspension on standing and on being subjected to temperature changes, (3) deposition of solid as a dulling film on the hair, and (4) considerable dilution of the product by a substantially inert or even deleterious ingredient are encountered in the formulation of such shampoos. The desirable performance characteristics of mildness to the skin and eyes, cleaning, lathering, and contributing to hair manageability should not be sacrificed in the course of providing a desirable physical form and appearance.

Substantially insoluble sodium soaps, such as sodium stearate, have often been used to thicken and opacify shampoos; but theytend to decrease lathering and deposit a dulling film on the hair. Often 5% to of such substantially insoluble and inert material is used. Furthermore, use of soaps necessitates a high pH of about 9 for the product in which they are used. Calcium and magnesium soaps, or soap curds, are formed when a formulation containing soap is used in hard water. Such alkaline earth metal soaps have been intentionally added'to shampoos to opacify them, and suffer from some of the disadvantages named above. I

Sodium alkyl glyceryl ether sulfonates are good cleaning and lathering agents having a mild reaction on the skin. However, it was found that their lathering performance was seriously affected by the lipides of the hair and scalp so that they were not ideally suited for the active ingredient of a shampoo.

Important objects of this invention are: to utilze the mild alkyl glyceryl ether sulfonates' in a cream shampoo having excellent lathering characteristics by providing a synergistic lather builder; to formulate a stable cream shampoo without adding a substantial amount of inert or deleterious opacifying and thickening agents; and to formulate a cream shampoo without using fatty acid soaps and suffering the attendant Imitation to an alkaline product and curd formation during use in hard water.

These and other objects are achieved in the subsequently disclosed compositions of this invention. Sodium alkyl glyceryl ether sulfonate is mixed, in specified ranges of ratios, with sodium N-acyl sarcosnate, as such or as the acid, and with the sodium salts of inorganic acids in an aqueous system. The range and distribution of chain length in the alkyl radicals of the sodium alkyl glyceryl ether sulfonate and the range of acyl chain lengths in the sarcosinate are specified.

nited States PatentO Too The single figure, more fully described hereinafter, shows the eifect of replacing sodium alkyl glyceryl ether sulfonate by sodium N-lauroyl sarcosinate on the height of lather built up after a .15 second interval of agitation of a suspension of 3% simulated hair and scalp lipidescontaining the dissolved surface active agents at a constant level of 3%. The temperature of the test solution was 37 C. 7

Sodium alkyl monoglyceryl ether sulfonate,

is the chief active lathering and cleaning ingredient of the compositions of this invention. usually prepared by reacting fatty alcohols with a slight excess of epichlorohydrin and then sulfonating the resulting chloroglyceryl ethers by means of the Streckerization reaction. Secondary reaction products, such as alkyl diglyceryl ether disulfonate,

-' ROCHz-CH-CHz-SOsNa L JHg-CHOH-CHTSOaNa amounts, less than about 3% total, of triglyceryl ethersulfonate and tetraglyceryl ether sulfonate may be present. Generally it is not desirable to reduce the alkyl diglyceryl ether content below about 5% for economic reasons and because a limited solubilizing effect is desirable. Note that the use of alkyl glyceryl ether sulfonate is intended to include monoglyceryl, diglyceryl and the traces of the higher glyceryl compounds. These and all other percentages herein are by Weight. If more of the diglyceryl products are present, crystal growth and loss of the stability of the suspension are promoted. The alkyl radicals (R of the above formulas) contain from about 10 to about 18 carbon atoms and are substantially without unsaturation.

The distribution of alkyl chain lengths has some effect,

as latter described, on the character of the product; a

satisfactory distribution can be achieved in a commercially practicable Way by using fatty alcohols derived from coconut oil and tallow. Of course, an equivalent distribution of alkyl chain lengths can be achieved using other starting materials. In the preparation of the coconut fatty alcohols used to provide the alkylgroup of the sodium alkyl glyceryl ether sulfonate, preferably the middle cut of the coconut alcohol is taken. The higher boiling out can be retained with the middle cut coconut alcohols if desired. In the preparation of the tallow fatty alcohols, a step of hydrogenation is included to insure that they are substantially saturated. The compositions given for middle cut coconut fatty alcohol and hydrogenated tallow fatty alcohol in Example 1 are typical. Sodium tallow glyceryl ether sulfonate can be employed at the ratios up to one part tallow per five,

parts sodium middle cut coconut glyceryl ether sulfonate. It is usually preferable, as will be explained later, to

include the tallow compound in the weight ratios of from This detergent is Other 3 about 1:5 to 1:10; and it is especially preferred to employ a ratio of about 1:8.

The purpose of the tallow glyceryl ether sulfonate, or a distribution of chain lengths equivalent to tallow from another source, is to precisely control the consistency of the product especially as it is made and packed. It has the eifect of shortening the texture of the fresh warm paste and reducing its tendency to pull out in strings during mechanical packaging. Enough is. added to serve this purpose, but excessive amounts are avoidedbecause of the lower solubility of the tallow than of the coconut glyceryl ether sulfonate under use conditions. In no event is enough insoluble material present at use concentration to harm the performance of the product as a shampoo. In the case of certain types of packing machinery, the difficulties caused by a stringy texture are overcome by longer filling times or by provisions for cutting off the strings of product so they do not trail over the edge of the container. When such machinery is used, the sodium tallow glyceryl ether sulfonate can be replaced by sodium coconut glyceryl ether sulfonate. To the consumer, the difference is not readily apparent; and, moreover, the choice is one of personal preference.

Suitable proportions of each alkyl chain length are illustrated below, the values given being approximate. While such proportions can be achieved using coconut oil or coconut oil with tallow as a source of alkyls, they can also be achieved in other practical ways by appropriately mixing other sources of the desired alkyl radicals. Suitable proportions are given in terms of fatty alcohols rather than in terms of sodium alkyl glyceryl ether sulfonates because the calculations can be made more accurately.

Percent Fatty Alcohol Having the Indicated Chain Length B Where decrease in stringiness is not desired 1 stearyL A distribution wherein the alkyl radicals of the sodium alkyl glyceryl ether sulfonate correspond to those of a mixture of fatty alcohols of which about 6% to about 11% contain 18 carbon atoms and substantially all of the remainder contain 12 to 16 carbon atoms is suitable in case A. A distribution wherein the alkyl radicals of the sodium alkyl glyceryl ether sulfonate correspond to those of a mixture of fatty alcohols of which substantially all contain 12 to 16 carbon atoms, the largest fraction containing 12 carbon atoms, is suitable in case B.

To sum the matter up, a satisfactory product from the consumers viewpoint can be formulated with sodium coconut glyceryl ether sulfonate or with mixed coconut and tallow glyceryl ether sulfonate wherein the ratio of tallow to middle cut coconut is no greater than 1:5. The mixed tallow-coconut glyceryl ether sulfonate gives a texture to the product which makes it suitable for all applicable types of mechanical packaging while maintaining or improving on the properties important to the consumer. In order to have an appreciable effect, at least one part tallow per ten parts middle cut coconut glyceryl ether sulfonate are required. Thus, the preferred range of tallow to middle cut coconut glyceryl ether sulfonates of from 1:5 to 1:10 is established.

Sodium N-acyl sarcosinate, RCO-NCH -CH -COONa,

ways to the overall performance of the product. It is intended to distinguish these synthetic detergents which have been called interrupted soaps from the simple soaps of fatty acids. The acyl radical (RCO) should contain from about ten to about sixteen carbon atoms and should be substantially without unsaturation. Coconut oil or its equivalent is a preferred source for acyl radical. Lauroyl or a mixture of a major portion of lauroyl with its neighbors from caproyl to palmitoyl are especially preferred as the acyl radical. Some of this agent can be added as the acid, N-acyl sarcosine, to control the pH of the products. For example, the alkyl glyceryl ether sulfonate may contain traces of free alkali, such as sodium hydroxide, and it is convenient to neutralize this with N-acyl sarcosine. Preferably the pH will be adjusted to from about 6.5 to about 8.5. It is suitable to employ solely the sarcosinate salt and to have an alkaline product with a pH of up to about 9. It is also possible to use only sarcosine, or use it in the major proportion, thereby achieving an acid pH which may be desirable for reasons of compatibility of special ingredients or for other reasons. If too little of the sarcosine or sarcosinate is used,

the desired lathering performance is not achieved; and, if too much is used, the shampoo becomes too fluid. Furthermore, economy dictates as low a 'level of sarcosine and sarcosinate as will achieve the desired effect. A weight ratio of sodium alkyl glyceryl ether sulfonate to sodium N-acyl sarcosinate of from about 10:1 to about 2:1 can be used; a ratio of about 6 1 is preferred.

A certain amount of inorganic electrolyte or salt is necessary to decrease the solubility of the sodium alkyl glyceryl ether sulfonate, thereby controlling its precipitation and the thickening and opacification 'of the product. As the product is diluted in use, the precipitated alkyl glyceryl ether sulfonate will be redissolved to provide the basic active ingredient. The inorganic electrolyte and sarcosinate are also added substantially as the sodium salts. Sodium salts of nitric, sulfuric, hydrochloric, and the phosphoric acids (H PO H POp, HPOE) and mixtures thereof are suitable inorganic electrolytes. Sodium salts of some organic acids, such as acetic and citric, are also applicable but, as a practical matter, are generally too expensive. In general sodium salts which are sufficiently soluble in the formulated detergent, which have a tendency to salt-out detergents, and which are harmless as to toxicity, odor, and mildness to the hair and scalp can be employed. As the sodium alkyl glyceryl ether sulfonate is usually obtained mixed with sodium chloride and sodium sulfate, it is economical and preferable to use these salts as part of the source of inorganic electrolyte; additional portions of these salts can be added to achieve the desired level.

A weight ratio of sodium alkyl glyceryl ether sulfonate to inorganic electrolyte of from about 4:1 to about 1.7:1 is suitable. If less inorganic electrolyte, or salt, is used, the product is too thin; if more is used, the electrolyte remains undissolved or undispersed and can contribute a gritty feel to the product. The preferred ratio is about 3: 1.

Additional ingredients, to increase hair manageability, to make the product more attractive in use, or to serve some other desirable purpose, can be added in small enough amounts so as not to interfere with the desired properties of the shampoo. Illustrative examples are lanolin derivatives and fatty diethanolamide (the reaction product of a fatty acid and diethanolamine) for increasing the manageability of the'shampooed hair, color and perfume to make the product more attractive, and antimicrobial agents and fluorescent dyes to serve other desirable purposes.

Fatty diethanolamide at 0.5% to 3% of the total composition has a further action of thickening the sham poo and afiecting its plastic properties. It is added inthe especially preferred compositions of this invention. at a level of about 2% of thetotal conipositien. Qoeo'nu't diethanolamide or its equivalent is preferred. An equivalent diethanolamide contains a mixture of acyl groups of from to 16 carbon atoms with the largest fraction containing 12 carbon atoms.

Sufficient water is included in the formulation to give the desired consistency to the product. In order to have suflicient dissolving capacity, more than about. 45% water is required; and, in order to have a thick enough product, not more than about 70% water should be used.. The preferred amount of water is from about 50% to about 60% of the total composition.

It is well known in the art that the consistency of cream shampoos and'other such products is affected by the processing conditions as they'atfect the rate and na ture of crystal growth. However, the proper formulation is a prerequisite, for no changes in processing can make a satisfactory cream product from a composition not adapted for such a form. A fixed time Precision Universal Penetrometer is a suitable instrument for measurement of consitency of cream shampoos. With this instrument, a precisely specified cone, under a 32.1 gram load, is allowed to penetrate the product at a specified temperature for 5 seconds. The depth of penetration is measured and recorded in tenths of millimeters. The cone is made of nylon and is a frustrum of a 60 right cone with a 1 diameter base and a V diameter point. Although satisfactory product can be made with as wide a range of pentration values as 30 to 250 at 70 F., it is preferred to have a penetration of from about 50 to about 150 at this temperature. The consistency often changes rapidly in an initial one to two day tempering period.

The single figure shows the synergistic lathering of a mixture of sodium N-lauroyl sarcosinate and sodium coconut glyceryl ether sulfonate. Along curve A representing lather heights after seconds of agitation, the lather height is higher than would be expected from the added eifects of the ingredients indicated by the broken curve, B. The ratios of the two ingredients suitable for this invention lie between the vertical marks indicated as C and D. Full advantage is not taken of the synergistic lather building indicated by these data because of limitations imposed by attainment of satisfactory physical properties and because of other limitations pointed out hereinbefore. These data were obtained by agitating 3% of each indicated mixture of the surface active agents in a 3% suspension of simulated haid and scalp lipides in a graduated 1000 ml. tallform beaker and observing the lather heights (in millimeters) after the specified interval. The apparatus, the speed of rotation of the agitator (about 1700 r.p.m.), and the volume of solution 50 ml. were all held constant. The simulated hair and scalp lipides were dispersed in a solution of the test composition in water of 7 grains hardness per gallon at 90 C. prior to the tests which began when the suspension had cooled to 37 C. While conditions of the test are not those on the human head, experience has shown that properly indicative results are obtained.

The composition of the simulated hair and scalp lipides was as follows: oleic acid, 15% coconut fatty'acid, 1.5%; commercial grade palmitic acid containing 14 to 22 carbon saturatted fatty acids and about 66% palmitic acid, 13.5%; coconut oil, 3%; lard, 27%; lanolin, cholesteriol, 2%; squalene, 4%; paraflin wax, 8%; lecithin, 1%; wheat germ oil, 1%; and glycerin, 4%.

Compositions illustrative of this invention are set forth in specific terms in the following examples. Percentages are by weight.

EXAMPLE I The following composition was prepared and tested.

Percent those of middle cut coconut alcohols and contain approximately 2% C 66% C 23% C and 9% C16) 25.0 Sodium tallow glyceryl ether sulfonate (about 23% diglyceryl and the balance substantially monoglyceryl; the tallow alkyls correspond to those of substantially saturated tallow alcohols and'contain approximately 2% C 32% C and 66% C 3.0 Sodium chloride 6.7 Sodium sulfate 3.3 Sodium N-lauroyl sarcosinate 3.8 N-cocoyl sarcosine 1.2 Coconut 1 diethanolamide 2.0 Acetylated lanolin (Modulan) 1.0 Perfume 0.4 Color 0.04 Phenyl mercuric acetate L 0.003 Water a Balance Ratio coconut to tallow glyceryl ether sulfonate 8.3 Ratio alkyl glyceryl ether sulfonates to sarcosine plussarcosinate 5.6 Ratio alkyl glyceryl ether sulfonates to inorganic electrolyte 2.8

1 Acyl radicals derived from coconut oil are predominantly C12 and C14.

The resulting opaque cream paste had a pleasing luster and a soft uniform consistency which changed unap-- preciably after the initial 2-day tempering. Storage at temperatures as high as 120 F. did not cause a visible increase in crystal size or change in the appearance of the product.

The pH of the cream paste was about 7. The texture was such that it could be packed mechanically without excessive stringing over the edges of the containers.

In use, this composition was highly acceptable in all respects and provided ample lather. The coconut diethanolamide, acetylated lanolin, perfume, phenyl mercuric acetate, and color can be omitted withoutsacrificing the essential objects of the invention. 4 i

' EXAMPLE II -A substantial duplication of the composition of Example I was prepared but with a sodium alkyl glyceryl ether sulfonate containing more diglyceryl ether sulfonate, The diglyceryl ethersulfonate was about 28% instead of about 23% of the total sodium alkyl glyceryl ether sulfonate. Also, the .N-cocoyl sarcosine was replaced by N-lauroyl sarcosine. This composition was equal in performance, appearance, and mechanical packaging characteristics to the composition of Example I, except that after one month of storage at 120 F. a slight but unimportant increase in crystal size was visible.

The data below show the consistency, as measured by penetration, of product stored for one week at the indicated temperatures. Penetration was measured at the temperature of storage. Satisfactory penetration values were obtained over the whole temperature range.

Penetration, expressed in units of 0.1 mm. [Storage temperature, F.]

EXAMPLE III where the perfume was added, and cooling to 100 where the product was packed. The composition was continuously stirred.

A, Per-. -B, Per- 0, Percent cent cent Sodium coconut 1 glyceryl ether sulfonate (about 28% diglyceryl and the balance substantially monoglyceryl) 27. 3 27.3 27.3 Sodium chloride r 1.1 6. 7 '3. 3 Sodium N-lauroyl sarcosinate 5. 5. 0 5. 0 Sodium sulfate .7 1.4 Y 3. 3 6. 7 Coconut 1 diethanolamidc 2. O 2. 0 2. O Acetylated lanolin. 1.0 1.0 1.0 Perfume 0. 6 0.6 0. 6 Water Bal. Bal. Bal. Ratio coconut glyceryl ether 'sulfonatc to sarcosinate 5. '5. 5 5. 5 Ratio coconut glyceryl ether sultonate to Y inorganic electrolyte 11 2 7 2. 7 Penetration. expressed in unitsof 0.1 mm., 3

days at temp.:

1 As in Example 1.

Products B and C had the usual silky appearance or sheen; A, which contained too little inorganic electrolyte, did not. Also, A was too soft at temperatures of from 90 to 100 F. being fluid at 100 F., while B and C were of the desired firmness.

The pH of one part of these products diluted with 9 parts water was about 9.2

Products B and C were well suited in performance andin appearance for a cream paste shampoo.

EXAMPLE IV Percent Sodium coconut glyceryl ether sulfonate (about 29% diglyceryl and the balance substantially Ratio alkyl glyceryl'ether sulfonate to inorganic electrolyte 1 As in Example I.

A product of this composition, containing a high water level of about 67%, was prepared. The paste was of a thin consistency. However, the consistency was judged suitable for a thin cream paste shampoo, and the paste had the desirable silky sheen.

EXAMPLE V The following acid cream shampoos were prepared for examination.

A, Percent B, Percent Sodium coconut glyceryl ether 'sulfonate (about 28% dlglyceryl and the balance monoglyceryl) Sodium tallow glyceryl ether sulfonatetabout 28% diglyceryl and the balance monoglyceryl) N-lauroyl sarcosineh Sodium N-lauroyl sarcosinate... Sodium chloride Sodium sulfate Coconut 1 diethanolamlde. Acetylated lanolin Perfume Water pH of paste diluted 1 Asdn Example '1'.

The pastes had a satisfactory consistency "and an opaque silky appearance. They lathered well and were -judged suitable :for a cream paste shampoo.

The sodium sulfate in this .formulationrnay the replaced wholly or in part by sodium'nitrate, NaNO or sodium dihydrogen orthophosphate, NaH PO The term consisting essentially of as used in the definition of the ingredients present in the composition claimed is intended to exclude the presence of other materials in such amounts as to interfere substantially with the properties and characteristics possessed by the composition set forth but to permit the presence of other materials in such amounts as not substantially to affect said properties and characteristics adversely. The disclosure of this invention and the claims directed to it are not intended to exclude the presence of some potassium ions.

What is claimed is:

1. A substantially soap-free opaque cream shampoo composition consisting essentially of:

parts of sodium alkyl glyceryl ether sulfonate wherein the alkyl radicals contain from 10 to 18 carbon atoms and the sodium alkyl diglyceryl ether sufonate content is less than 30% and more than about 5% of said sodium alkyl glyceryl ether sulfonatc;

from 10 to 50 parts of a member of the group consisting of N-acyl secosine; sodium N-acyl sarcosinate, and mixtures thereof, wherein the acyl radicals contain from 10 to 16 carbon atoms;

from 25 to 60 parts of inorganic sodium salt selected from the group consisting of NaCl, Na SO NaNO Na PO Na HPO and NaH PO and mixtures thereof; and

water at from about 45% to about 70% of the total composition to achieve a plastic consistency.

2. The composition of claim 1 wherein the sodium alkyl glyceryl ether sulfonate is a mixture of from onefifth to one-tenth parts sodium hydrogenated tallow glyceryl ether sulfonate per part of sodium middle cut coconut glyceryl ether sulfonate.

3. The composition of claim 1 wherein the sodium alkyl glyceryl ether sulfonate is sodium middle cut coconut glyceryl ether sulfonate.

4. The composition of claim 1 wherein the alkyl radicals of the sodium alkyl glyceryl ether sulfonate correspond to those of a mixture of fatty alcohols of which from about 6% to about 11% contain 18 carbon atoms and substantially all of the remainder contain 12 to 16 carbon atoms.

5. The composition of claim 1 wherein substantially all of the alkyl radicals of the sodium alkyl glyceryl ether sulfonate contain 12 to 16 carbon atoms and alkyl radicals containing 12 carbon atoms constitute the largest fraction.

6. A substantially soap-free opaque cream shampoo composition consisting essentially of:

100 parts of sodium alkyl glyceryl ether sulfonatc wherein the alkyl radicals correspond to those of a mixture of fatty alcohols in which from about 89% to about 100% contain from 10 to 16 carbon atoms, lauryl alcohol constituting the largest fraction, and in which from about 11% to about 0% contain 18 carbon atoms, and the sodium alkyl diglyceryl ether sulfonate content is less than 30% and more than about 5% of said sodium alkyl glyceryl ether sulfonate;

from 10 to 50 parts of a member of the groupconsisting of N-acyl sarcosine, sodium N-acyl sarconsinate, and mixtures thereof, wherein the acyl radicals contain from 10 to 16 carbon atoms;

from 25 to 60 parts of inorganic sodium salt selected from the' 'group consisting of NaCl, Na S O NaNO a 9 Na PQ Na HPO;, NaH PO and mixtures thereof; and water at from about 45% to about 70% of the total composition to achieve a plastic consistency.

7. A substantially soap-free opaque cream shampoo composition consisting essentially of:

60 parts of sodium alkyl glyceryl ether sulfonate wherein the alkyl radicals correspond to those of a mixture of fatty alcohols in which from about 89% to about 100% of the alkyl radicals contain from 10 to 16 carbon atoms, lauryl alcohol constituting the largest fraction thereof, and from about 11% to about contain 18 carbon atoms, and wherein the sodium alkyl glyceryl ether sulfonate content is less than 30% and more than about of said sodium alkyl glyceryl ether sulfonate;

about parts of a member of the group consisting of N-acyl sarcosine, sodium N-acyl sarcosinate, and mixtures thereof, wherein the acyl radicals contain from 10 to 16 carbon atoms;

about 20 parts of inorganic sodium salt selected from the group consisting of NaCl, Na S0 NaNO Na PO Na HPO NaH PO and mixtures thereof; and

water at from about 50% to about 60% of the total composition to achieve a plastic consistency.

-8. A substantially soap-free opaque cream shampoo composition consisting essentially of about:

28% sodium alkyl glyceryl ether sulfonate wherein the alkyl radicals correspond to those of a mixture of fatty alcohols in which about 89% to about 100% contain from about 10 to 16 carbon atoms, l'auryl alcohol constituting the largest fraction thereof, and in which from about 11% to about 0% contain 18 carbon atoms, and wherein the sodium alkyl diglyceryl ether sulfonate content is less than 30% and more than about 5% of said sodium alkyl glyceryl ether sulfonate;

5% of a member of the group consisting of N-acyl sarcosine, sodium N-acyl sarcosinate, and mixtures thereof, wherein the acyl radicals contain from 10 to 16 carbon atoms;

10% of inorganic sodium salts selected from the group, consisting of NaCl and Na SO and mixtures thereof; and

water at from about 50% to about 60% of the total composition to achieve a plastic consistency.

10 9. The composition of claim 8 containing about 2% fatty diethanolamide, wherein the acyl radicals contain from 10 to 16 carbon atoms, and acyls of 12 carbon atoms constitute the largest fraction.

10. A substantially soap-free opaque cream shampoo consisting essentially of sodium alkyl glyceryl ether sulfonate wherein the alkyl radicals contain from 10 to 16 carbon atoms, alkyl radicals of 12 carbon atoms constituting the largest fraction thereof, and wherein the alkyl diglyceryl ether sulfonate content is less than and more than about 5% of said sodium alkyl glyceryl ether sulfonate;

3% of sodium alkyl glyceryl ether sulfonate wherein the alkyl radicals contain from 14 to 18 carbon atoms, alkyl radicals of 18 carbon atoms constituting the largest fraction thereof; and wherein the alkyl diglyceryl ether sulfonate content is less than 30% of said sodium alkyl glyceryl ether sulfonate;

10% of a mixture of NaCl and NaSO 5% of a mixture of about 25% N-acyl sarcosine with about 75% sodium N-acyl sarcosinate, wherein the acyl radicals contain from 10 to 16 carbon atoms, acyl radicals of 12 carbon atoms constituting the largest fraction; and from about to water to achieve a plastic consistency.

11. The composition of claim 10 wherein the alkyl radicals and the acyl radicals of from 10 to 16 carbon atoms are coconut radicals and wherein the alkyl radicals of from 14 to 18 carbon atoms are hydrogenated tallow radicals.

12. The composition of claim '10 containing about 2% fatty diethanolamide, wherein the acyl radicals contain from 10 to 16 carbon atoms.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,094,489 Hueter Sept. 28, 1937 2,542,385 Ayo et al. 'Feb. 20, 1951 2,877,185 Krumrei et al Mar. 10, 1959 OTHER REFERENCES Acylated Amino Acids in Shampoos, by H. W. Zussman et al. in Journal of the Society of Cosmetic Chemists, vol. 6, No. 5, December 1955, pages 407-415.

. UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE CERTIFICATE OF CORRECTION Patent NOa 2,979,465 April 11, 1961 John J, Parran et a1.

it is hereby certified that error appears in the above numbered patent requiring correction and that the said Letters Patent should read as corrected below,

Column 1, line 64, for "sarcosnate" read sarcosinate column 5, line 4-7, for "haid" read hair 3 lines 63 and 64, for "cholesteriol" read cholesterol column 8, line 28,

for "secosine" read sarc osine column 9, line 15, for "glycery'l" read diglyceryl Signed and sealed this 26th day of September 1961.

(SEAL) Attest:

ERNEST W. SWIDER Attesting Officer DAVID L. LADD Commissioner of Patents USCOMM-DC

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4673525 *May 13, 1985Jun 16, 1987The Procter & Gamble CompanyUltra mild skin cleansing composition
US4812253 *Jun 15, 1987Mar 14, 1989The Procter & Gamble CompanyUltra mild skin cleansing composition
US5002680 *Jul 12, 1989Mar 26, 1991The Procter & Gamble CompanyAnionic Or Amphoteric Surfactant, Polymeric Skin Feel Aid, Moisturizer, Water, Propellant
US5076953 *Feb 1, 1989Dec 31, 1991The Procter & Gamble CompanySkin cleansing synbars with low moisture and/or selected polymeric skin mildness aids
US5096608 *Jan 9, 1989Mar 17, 1992The Procter & Gamble CompanyUltra mild skin cleansing composition
US5783200 *Jan 21, 1997Jul 21, 1998The Procter & Gamble CompanyPersonal cleansing compositions
US6096697 *May 21, 1998Aug 1, 2000The Procter & Gamble CompanyPersonal cleansing compositions providing improved hair and skin conditioning
US7147673Apr 1, 2004Dec 12, 2006L'oreal S.A.Composition for dyeing human keratin materials, comprising at least one fluorescent dye and at least one insoluble polyorganosiloxane conditioning polymer, process therefor and use thereof
US7150764Apr 1, 2004Dec 19, 2006L'oreal S.A.compositions for dyeing with a lightening effect a human keratin material
US7186278Apr 1, 2004Mar 6, 2007L'oreal S.A.Composition for dyeing human keratin materials, comprising at least one fluorescent dye and at least one compound comprising an acid functional group and processes therefor
US7192454Apr 1, 2004Mar 20, 2007L'oreal S.A.Composition for dyeing human keratin materials, comprising a fluorescent dye and a particular sequestering agent, process therefor and use thereof
US7195650Apr 1, 2004Mar 27, 2007L'oreal S.A.Process for dyeing, with a lightening effect, human keratin fibers that have been permanently reshaped, using at least one composition comprising at least one fluorescent dye
US7195651Apr 1, 2004Mar 27, 2007L'oreal S.A.Reducing skin and/or hair color; lighter, uniform, homogeneous tones of natural appearance; kits
US7198650Apr 1, 2004Apr 3, 2007L'oreal S.A.Applying mixture to hair; development; rinsing
US7204860Apr 1, 2004Apr 17, 2007L'orealUsing aliphatic diol; dyeing hair
US7208018Apr 1, 2004Apr 24, 2007L'orealComposition for dyeing human keratin materials, comprising at least one fluorescent dye and at least one associative polymer, process therefor and use thereof
US7217296Sep 24, 2002May 15, 2007L'oreal S.A.Dyeing composition with a lightening effect for human keratin materials comprising at least one fluorescent dye
US7250064Apr 1, 2004Jul 31, 2007L'oreal S.A.Using crosslinked acrylic polymer
US7261744Dec 23, 2003Aug 28, 2007L'oreal S.A.Method for dyeing or coloring human keratin materials with lightening effect using a composition comprising at least one fluorescent compound and at least one optical brightener
US7303589Apr 1, 2004Dec 4, 2007L'oreal S.A.Process for dyeing human keratin fibers, having a lightening effect, comprising at least one fluorescent compound and compositions of the same
US7736631Apr 1, 2004Jun 15, 2010L'oreal S.A.Organic pigment colors and a modified polydimethylsiloxane homopolymer or copolymers for lightening hair or skin; multi-compartment kit for dyeing
EP0251250A2 *Jun 26, 1987Jan 7, 1988Henkel Kommanditgesellschaft auf AktienHair treating composition
EP0592073A2 *Jul 15, 1993Apr 13, 1994Colgate-Palmolive Company (a Delaware corporation)Mild personal cleansing compostions containing sodium alcohol ethoxy glyceryl sulfonate
EP0651047A2 *Oct 14, 1994May 3, 1995MERCK PATENT GmbHCleaning and sterilizing solutions and use thereof
WO1997033555A1 *Feb 28, 1997Sep 18, 1997Procter & GambleHigh lather styling shampoos
Classifications
U.S. Classification510/126, 510/127, 510/404, 510/108, 510/490
International ClassificationC11D3/02, C11D1/10, C11D1/16, C11D17/00
Cooperative ClassificationC11D1/16, A61K8/23, A61K8/466, C11D3/046, C11D17/003, A61Q5/02, C11D1/10
European ClassificationC11D3/04S, C11D1/16, C11D17/00B6, C11D1/10, A61Q5/02, A61K8/23, A61K8/46F