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Publication numberUS2981322 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 25, 1961
Filing dateSep 23, 1959
Priority dateSep 23, 1959
Publication numberUS 2981322 A, US 2981322A, US-A-2981322, US2981322 A, US2981322A
InventorsHenry C Schum
Original AssigneeHenry C Schum
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Auxiliary liquid fuel supply system for outboard motors and the like
US 2981322 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

, April 25, 1961 INVENTOR @@ZM 4M' ATTORNEYS' nited States AUXILIARY LIQUID FUEL SUPPLY SYSTEM FR OUTBOARD MOTORS AND THE LIKE This invention relates to fuel supply systems for internal combustion engines, such as outboard motors, which utilize liquid fuel.

It is an object of the invention generally provide an improved liquid fuel supply system for outboard motors, and particularly to provide such a system which is well suited to function as an auxiliary fuel supply system for outboard motors under certain circumstances.

It is another object of the invention to provide an improved auxiliary liquid fuel supply system having improved connector means for permitting operative association of the system with an outboard motor quickly, easily and safely.

It is still another object of the invention to provide an improved coupling having improved connector means.

The above and other objects and further details of that which I believe to be novel and my invention will be clear from the following description and claims taken with the accompanying drawings, wherein:

Fig. l is a side elevational view of a boat and an outboard motor which are operatively associated, the boat being broken away for clarity. In this view, the usual forced feed fuel supply system for the outboard motor is shown in dotted lines, and the auxiliary gravity feed fuel supply system contemplated by the invention is shown in solid lines;

Fig. 2 is an enlarged elevational view of the coupling means of the usual forced feed fuel supply system shown in Fig. l on an enlarged scale;

Fig. 3 is an enlarged sectional View taken longitudinally centrally through the connector means of the auxiliary fuel supply system contemplated by the invention;

Fig. 4 is a sectional view taken substantially on line 4 4 of Fig 3;

Fig. 5 is a side eleva-tional view on an enlarged scale of the auxiliary fuel supply system contemplated by the invention, which is shown in Fig. l in use operatively associated with an outboard motor, showing the auxiliary system in its condition when not in use;

Fig. 6 is an enlarged perspective View of the filler cap;

Fig. 7 is an enlarged elevational view of the connector means of the auxiliary fuel supply system contemplated by the invention coupled to the usual connector means of an outboard motor which is usually coupled to the connector means of the usual forced feed fuel supply system; and

Fig. 8 is an end elevational view looking in the direction of the arrow in Fig. 7.

In the operation of certain liquid fuel powered internal combustion engines, particularly outboard motors, it is frequently necessary' to provide an auxiliary fuel supply system which normally is not used but which is available for use under certain circumstances. The invention relates to such an `auxiliary liquid fuel supply system and it is particularly well suited for use in existing outboard motor environments, and therefore, it will be disclosed as occurring in such an environment for the purposes of exemplication.

2,98l,322 Patented Apr. 25, 1961l In the operation of boats powered by contemporary outboard motors, a number of different circumstances may arise wherein it is desirable to utilize an auxiliary fuel supply system for the outboard motor. Examples of such circumstances are (l) in emergencies when the normal fuel supply system runs out of fuel, and (2) when operating a boat between a dock and its usual mooring or anchorage.

In operating large boats having outboard motors of higher horse power, it is conventional practice to utilize a relatively large gasoline tank, to locate it in the boat remotely from the motor and to connect it to the motor by a pair of flexible tubes, 'one carrying gasoline from the tank to the carburetor of the motor, and the other carrying air under pressure from a pump on the motor to the tank to force the gasoline from the tank to the carburetor. This conventional 'organization is illustrated in Fig. 1 by the dotted line representation. In Fig. l the boat is designated by reference character B `and it may comprise any type or size boat that is appropriate to be powered by an outboard motor. The outboard motor, which is designated generally by reference character M, is mounted at the stern of the boat in any convenient known manner. The usual gasoline tank T is placed in a convenient part of the boat and connected to the motor by a pair of flexible tube lines that are broken at intermediate points in the lines and detachably coupled to each other. The tank T has a pair of flexible tubes A and F connected to it and communicating with its interio-r which are operatively associated with a connector C of known construction. The connector C, the tubes A and F and the tank T normally form an independent assembly. The tank T includes a handle H to facilitate manual transporting, and has a filler opening (unnumbered) normally closed by an air-tight filler cap` FC. The other portions of the tube lines between the tank T and the motor M are formed by a pair of flexible tubes 10 and 12. Fexible tube 10 is connected at one of its ends to the carburetor 14 which forms a part of the motor and at its other end to a connector 16 of known construction. Flexible tube 12 is connected at one of its ends to an air pump 18 which forms a part of the motor and at its other end to the connector 16. The motor M, carburetor 14, air pump 18, flexible tubes 10 and 12 and connector 16 normally form an independent assembly. It is usual practice to fill the tank T with gasoline, to transport the tank and its associated parts to the boat B and to couple the connector C and connector 16 (as.

shown in dotted lines in Fig. 1). When this is done, the motor M has a conventional forced feed fuel supply system.

It frequently :occurs in use of a boat powered by an outboard motor that the usual forced feed fuel supply system exhausts itself of fuel and it is necessary either to utilize an auxiliary fuel supply system or to refill the tank Ttwhile the boat is `afloat by pouring gasoline into it from a separate can that is usually available for such an emergency. Most permanently installed auxiliary fuel supply systems are rather complicated andcostly. The practice of pouring gasoline from a can to the tank T is extremely dicult and dangerous when the boat is afloat. Therefore, it is desirable to have a simple, inexpensive, auxiliary fuel supply system for the motor M which may be brought into operative association with the motor when the boat is afloat in a quick, easy, safe manner.

There are other circumstances under which it is desirable to have an auxiliary fuel supply system, such as when operating a boat between a dock and its usual mooring or anchorage. It is -usual practice when embarking, for the boat to be moored or anchored some distance from the dock, and it is common practice for the boatman to tiil'vthe tank T with gasoline at `the dock, put it into a dinghy or small rowboat and to row out to the larger` boat B. Sometimes the boiatman also carries the outboard lmotor M with him from the dock to the larger boat, which is moored on anchored away from the dock. The tank T usually holds sixgallons of gasoline and weighs about sixty pounds. Therefore it is a diflicult job totransfer the gasoline filled tank T from the dock to the dinghy, and from the latter to the larger boat B,

It is desirable to have an auxiliary fuel supply system for the outboard motor M which has a fuel tank witha smaller capacity, such as oneorV two quarts, than the tank 'I It is desirable that suchanauxiliary fuel supply System be available S that the boatman man carry it` out tothe larger. boat B in a dinghy 0.1"` tov/boat.. and then emporarily utilize the auxiliary, fuelA supply vsystem with the motor M to start the motor and operatetheboat from its` moored or anchored position tothe, dock, where the heavier, usual gasoline tllledank T mayy then beV directly placedr into the larger boat Bv from the dock. When returning from boating, the reverse procedure may be utilized; that is, the boat B may b efbrought up to the dock, the tank T removed therefrom and the auxiliary fuel supply system utilized to operate the boat B from the dock to its moorage or anchorage.

In order to understand the invention, it is necessary to understand in a general way the construction and operation of the known connector C and connector 16. In Fig. 2 there is illustrated on `an enlarged scale the coupling formed by these, connectors. The connector 16, which is normally a part of the motor M assembly, comprises a body 19 havinga pair of spaced axially extending pins 20, 22 that are connected at one of their axial ends to the flexible tubes and 12, respectively, Iand which project from the body 19 at their other axial ends. The connector`16 includes a locking pin 24 which extends from the body 19 on one side thereof and which is spaced from and generally-parallel to the pins 20 and 22. The pins 20 and 22 have axial passages 26, V28, respectively formed therein which at one of their axial ends extend through the pins and communicate with the tubes 10 and 12, respectively, and which at their other axial ends terminate short of the ends of the pins and communicate with lateral ports 30, 32, respectively, which exit through the sides of the pins. The locking pin 24 hasa conical head 34 formed at its free end and fanV annulargroove 36 formed adjacent to the head 34.

The connector 16 is` adapted to be detachably coupled totheconnector C to establish the usual forced feed fuel supply system. The connector C includes self-sealing valying means and is normally sealed, thereby closing ofr the tubes F andA A from the atmosphere. The connectors cooperate in such fa manner when coupled to automatically place the tubes F and A and fthe tubes 10 and 12, respectiyely, into communicationwith each other to establish'anyopen fuel line from the tank T to the motor M.

The connector C comprises a body having a pair of spaced parallel cylindrical chambers, which at one of their ends communicate with 'the tubes F and A, and at their other endcommunicate with the atmosphere through normally closed valve openings. The openings are normally closed whenV the connectors C and 16 are detached, by self-sealing means in the form of spring-pressed valve plungers that are automatically retracted by the pins 20 and 22 of the connector 16, which` enter the chambers when these connectors are coupled. The body of connector C supports a pivoted spring-pressed latching member L on its exterior that is adaptedrto cooperate with the locking pin 34 of connector 16 to temporarily lock these connectors in coupled relationship, but to permit their easy detachment by pivoting the laitching member L and pulling the connectors apart. Thepconstruction of the Vconnector C will not be herein disclosed further because it is of a construction generally known in the art. However, ity isv necessary for anl understanding'ofthe instant invention to generally understand the construction and operation of the connector Cand to understand' that during normal operation of the motor M with its forced feed fuel supply system the connectors C and 16 are connected as illustrated in Fig. l in dotted lines.

In the event circumstances arise wherein it is desirable to utilize an auxiliary fuel supply system, such as the circumstances mentioned abovejmy invention may be utilized to simply, easily and safely convert from the normal forced feed fuel supply to an auxiliary -fuel supply system.

My invention contemplates a portable light-weight auxiliary gravity feed fuel" supply systemv which may be readily transported to andfrom a boat and which may be selectively employed as an auxiliary fuel supply system whenever the circumstances dictate by simple, easy and safe manipulation.

In Fig. 5 the auxiliary fuel supply system is illustrated incondition when it is inoperativeas afuel supply system, that is, in condition to be conveniently stored or transported; it is normally maintained in the Fig. 5 condition when not in use. The auxiliary fuel supply system comprises container means forV liquid fuel which may take any convenient form, such as the can 38. Can 38 includes a handle 40 to facilitate its carrying about, and a plurality of mounting legs 42 having means at their free ends to temporarily attach the can 38 to the top of the motor M, which are illustrated as being in the form of resilient suction cups 44 but which may take any other suitable form, such as brackets or straps. On the under side of the can 38 there is formed an outlet opening 46 into which an end of the exible hose y48 may be secured in any convenient manner, as by having an externally threaded mounting bushing 50 threadedly received in the opening 46. The other end of the-flexible hose 48 is secured to the4 self-sealing connector 52 which forms a part of the auxiliary system.

In Fig. 5, the connector 52, the detailed construction of which will be set forth subsequently, is illustrated as being supported by and coupled to the filler cap 54, which in turn is threadedly detachably mounted on a threaded collar 56 which forms a part of the can 38 andsurrounds a ller opening 58. As can best be seen in Fig. 6, the filler cap 54 comprises a at circular top 6i) having a peripheral skirt 62 with threads formed therein to permit its mounting on threaded collar 56, and roughened portions 64 to facilitate manual gripping thereof. The top 60 is centrally apertured and supports a venting pin 66V having a passageway 68 formed therein which places the interior of the cap (and can 38 when the cap is attached thereto) into communication with the at-mosphere through atransverse port 70 when the auxiliary system is in operative condition (see Fig. l). The venting pin y66 may be secured to the cap 54 in any convenient manner, as by having a locating flange 72 and a threaded stem 74 that passes through the aperture in the cap top 60 and receives a nut 76 on the lower side of the cap top. A bent L-shaped spring strip 78 is supported on the upper surface of the can top 60. This support can be conveniently effected by passing the threaded stem 74 of the venting pin 66 through an opening (not shown) in the legk'80 of the strip 78. The leg 82 of the strip 78 includes an offsetU-shaped section 84 in the vicinity 0f where the leg 82 intersects the leg 80.

The connector 52 is generally cylindrical in` external configuration and has an annular radially outwardly extending rib 86. The rib 86 is positioned axially on the connector 52 so as to be disposed in the olfset section 34 of the strip leg 82 when the connector isin its Fig. 5 position, and to thereby temporarily lock theconnector 52VA on theVA cap 5,4 as illustrated in Eig. 5. When thev connector S2 is disposed in its Fig. 5 position, it seals the vented filler cap 54 and therefore evaporation of liquid fuel is obviated.

As can best be seen in Figs. 3 and 4, the connector 52 comprises a generally cylindrical body having the external rib 86 described above. The connector body has an axial passage extending completely therethrough which is formed by a series of communicating circular bores 88, 90, 92 and 94. The bore 94 extends principally through an axial extension 96 at one end of the connector body about which an end of the flexible tube 48 is seated; the extension 96 includes an enlargement 98 to lock the tube thereon. In the bore 88, there is disposed an annular washer 100 adjacent to a shoulder 102 which positions and assists in the seating of a resilient Oring 104. The O-ring is further positioned and retained in place by the locking bushing 106 which is frictionally tted in the bore 88. As can best be seen in Fig. 3, the opening 108 in the washer 100 and the opening 110 in the bushing 106 are coaxial and of equal diameter, whereas the opening 112 in the O-ring 104 is of lesser diameter. As also can best be seen in Fig. 3, the bushing 106 has an annular recess 114 in one of its axial sides in which the O-ring is seated when fully mounted. The washer 100, O-ring 104 and locking bushing 106 cooperate to form a valve opening and seat, as will become apparent.

Within the bore 90, a plunger 116 is disposed for longitudinal controlled movement. Plunger 116 comprises a main body portion 118 having a circular internal recess 120 on one axial side. Body portion 118 is generally square in cross section, but has rounded corners 122 formed thereon (see Fig. 4) which have sliding bearing contact with the walls of bore 90. On the other axial side of the body portion 118, a cylindrical valve stem 124 having a tapered valve head 126 is formed. The plunger 116 is disposed in the bore 90 so as to have its valve stem 124 face the valve seat and opening formed by the O-ring 104 and its associated parts. A coil compression spring 128 is disposed in the connector body and has one of its ends disposed within the recess 120 in the plunger body portion 118 and its other end disposed in the bore 92 so as to contact the shoulder 130. The internal construction of the connector 52 is such that the plunger 116 is normally biased to the right as viewed in Fig. 3 so that its valve head 126 is in rm contact with a portion of the O-ring 104 and thereby closes the valve opening formed thereby, hence is self-sealing. The plunger 116, however, may be forcibly retracted by an axial force exerted on the valve head 4126 and directed toward the left in Fig. 3.

With the foregoing understanding of the construction of the connector 52 and by again referring to Fig. 5, it will be understood that the mounting of the connector 52 on the venting filler cap 54 results in sealing the auxiliary fuel supply system because the portion of the venting pin 66 of the cap 54 having port 70 is disposed within the bore 90 of the connector body and the O-ring embraces the shank of the venting pin to seal it. Therefore, the auxiliary fuel supply system is sealed when in the Fig. 5 condition and evaporation of gasoline is obviated.

Assuming that the auxiliary fuel supply system is in the Fig. 5 condition and circumstances arise wherein it is necessary or desirable to provide an auxiliary fuel supply system for the outboard motor, for example, the boat is under way and the normal forced feed fuel supply system runs out of fuel, the auxiliary system illustrated in Fig. 5 may be easily, quickly and safely brought into operation to supply fuel to the outboard motor.

With reference to Fig. l, let us assume that the boat B is in normal operating condition, that is, being operated with its normal forced feed fuel supply system shown in dotted lines. At this time, the connectors C and 16 are coupled and the outboard motor M operates in its normal manner. When it becomes necessary to utilize an auxiliary fuel supply system, the auxiliary system, which is carried in the boat at all times in its Fig. 5 condition and located in -a convenient place, is mounted on the top of the motor M, as shown in Fig. 1, the connectors C and 16 are uncoupled and the connector 52 is coupled to the connector 16; all of the manipulations are effected easily, quickly and safely. The connectors C and 16 are uncoupled by depressing the latching member L and pulling these connectors apart. By virtue of the usual construction of the conventional connector C, this connector will seal itself automatically when itis uncoupled, and it may be placed at a convenient place in the boat, for example, adjacent the tank T. The connector 52 and connector 16 are coupled by removing connector 52 from the venting ller cap 54 and coupling it to the connector 16, as shown in solid lines in Fig. 1 and in Figs. 7 and 8. Coupling of the connectors 52 and 16 is effected in the following manner: The n'b 86 on the connector 52 has an arcuate peripheral notch 132 formed therein in one portion of its periphery. The connector l52 is juxtaposed to the connector 16 in such a manner that the pin 20 of the latter is axially aligned with the opening 112 in the O-ring 104 of the connector 52, and the locking pin 24 of the connector 16 is axially 'aligned so as to clear the notch 132 in the rib 86 of the connector 52. The parts are then moved axially toward each other until the head 34 of the locking pin 24 axially clears the rib 86, and then the connectors are twisted a slight axial extent relative to each other. At this time, the connectors 52 and 16 are locked in coupled condition, as can be seen in Figs. 7

and 8, by virtue of the rib 86 being disposed in the groove 36 on the locking pin 24. At this time, the interior of the can 38 is vented to the atmosphere through the venting iiller cap 54, and is in direct communication with the carburetor 14 of the motor M through the flexible tube 48, connectors 52 and 16, and flexible tube 10. This obtains, because on coupling of the connectors S2 and 16, the pin 20 of Ithe latter contacts the valve head 126 of the plunger 116 and retracts it axially to thereby place the passageway 26 and port 30 of the pin 20 into communication with the interior of the connector `52 through the bores 90, 92 and 94, and into communication with the interior of the tube 48 (see Fig. 7).

In view of the foregoing, it will be apparent that in order to convert from the normal forced feed fuel supply 'system to an auxiliary gravity feed fuel supply system, whenever circumstances which dictate such a change arise, that it is simply necessary to couple the connector 52 of the auxiliary system to the connector 16 of the motor. When this is done, the auxiliary system, which until this time has been stored in its sealed Fig. 5 condition, is vented to the atmosphere through the venting ller cap 54, and therefore, the auxiliary system is operated by gravity. My invention completely eliminates the necessity of attempting to pour gasoline from an emergency can into the usual gas tank of the outboard motor, which is ditlicult and quite dangerous when the boat is under way. Furthermore, my invention eliminates the need to transport the usual heavy gasoline-filled tank T from the dock to the boat B, which is likely to be moored or anchored away from the dock, in a dinghy or small boat, and thereby eliminates the diilicult and onerous task of carrying the heavy tank into Iand out of boats.

As will be evident from the foregoing description, certain aspects of my invention are not limited to the particular details of construction of the example illustrated, and I contemplate that various and other modications and applications will occur to those skilled in the art. It is, therefore, my intention that the appended claims shall cover such modifications and applications as do not depart from the true spirit and scope of my invention.

What I claim as new anddesire to secure by Letters Patent of the United States is:

l. In an auxiliary liquid fuel supply system, a liquid fuel operated motor, acarburetor forming@ part of said motor,l aA tubular fuel supply means connected toV said carburetor including a, coupling member. provided with a projecting pin, having au inlet opening` and passage from vthe opening toF the tubular means, an auxiliary liquidy fuel container provided with a filling opening, a closure for said opening including an outwardly, extending pin provided with a vent opening outside the container and a passage leading from this opening to the inside of the container, means for removably mounting the container. on the motor at a level above that of the carburetor, a iiexible hose connection from thelower part of the container, a connectorconnected to the free end of said hose comprising aA hollow body provided with a valve controlled exit opening adapted to receive the. vented pin of either the. tankA closure or the coupling, and a spring-biased valve: normally closing said valve opening to self-seal itand retractableby insertion of either of said pins to placethre hose in communication with either the container or the carburetor.

2. In an auxiliary liquid fuel supply system, a `motor including a carburetor, a tubular fuel supply connection to the carburetor including a coupling member having a projecting pin provided with an inlet opening andpassage leading to said .tubularlconnectiom a second pin on said coupling member parallel to the first pin provided with a groove in its side wall, an auxiliary fuel container' provided with a filling opening, a removable closure for said opening comprising a venting pin mounted to project outwardly from .the closure provided with a vent opening outside the closure and a passage from this opening to the interior of the container, means for removably mounting the container on the motor at a level above that of the fuel connectionto the carburetor, a llexible fuel feed hose connected to the lower part of the container, a selfsealing connector connected to the free end of said hose comprising a hollow body provided with an exit opening in its ffree end, a valve in said body spring-biased to normally close said latter opening for self-sealing said hnselsad; Opening intheconnectar' adeptes-11i@ Selsetifely receive the pin in the container closure vvto seal the veutv opening and` the first pin on the coupling` mlnberr` to retract the. valve and connect the horse .toV the tubular QQllf nectionV forv gravity feed of fuel from. the container to the carburetor, and means on the connector cooperating with the groove in the second pinl on the couplinglmember to detachably connect the connector to the coupling member. Y

3. In an auxiliary fuel supply system. for a liquid fuel motor, an auxiliary fuel container provided with a filling opening, a removable closure for said opening including a venting pin mounted in and projecting outwardly from the closure, said pin provided with a vent opening outside the closure and a passage leadinggfrom said opening to the interior of the container, said container provided with mounting 4means whereby it may beremovably secured to a motor, a flexible fuel feed` hoserconneted to the lower part of the container, a self-sealing connector connected to the free end ofsaid hose comprising a hollow body provided with an exit opening in its free end, a valve seat and a retractible valve member cooperating therewith in the body to control said latter opening, av spring biasing said valve member to the valve seat to normally self-seal the exit opening from the connector, said latter opening adapted to receive said pin on thc closure and retract the valve member toclose the vent opening therein, and cooperating releasable catch means on the connector and closure to'secure the connector to the closure.

References Cited in the tile of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,389,685 like c V.- Nov. 27, 1945 2,656,828l Conover n Oct. 27, 1953 2,676,559 Davies n Apr. 27, 1954 FORETGN PATENTS 252,652 Great Britain June 3, 1926

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2389685 *May 2, 1944Nov 27, 1945Pike Wickliffe HEmergency gasoline tank
US2656828 *Oct 1, 1949Oct 27, 1953Outboard Marine & Mfg CoFuel supplying means using crankcase pressure developed in a twocycle engine for delivering fuel to the carburetor
US2676559 *Dec 11, 1951Apr 27, 1954Victor N DaviesOutboard motor for watercraft
GB252652A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3393698 *Feb 9, 1966Jul 23, 1968Jesus HuanteEmergency fuel tank
US3410299 *May 18, 1966Nov 12, 1968Nat Latex Prod CoValve for inflatable article
US4269219 *Apr 11, 1979May 26, 1981Helge DybvigFittings for releasably interconnecting a fuel tank with an internal combustion engine
US5365906 *Dec 20, 1993Nov 22, 1994Chrysler CorporationFluid flow check valve for fuel system
US5407348 *Feb 10, 1993Apr 18, 1995Victor Equipment CompanyTorch with integral flashback arrestors and check valves
Classifications
U.S. Classification137/515.5, 251/149.6, 123/195.00P, 137/269
International ClassificationF02B1/00, F02M37/00
Cooperative ClassificationF02M2700/4385, F02B1/00, B63H21/265
European ClassificationF02B1/00, B63H21/26B