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Publication numberUS2981455 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 25, 1961
Filing dateDec 3, 1956
Priority dateDec 3, 1956
Publication numberUS 2981455 A, US 2981455A, US-A-2981455, US2981455 A, US2981455A
InventorsCope Paul E
Original AssigneeProcter & Gamble
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Carton
US 2981455 A
Images(2)
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

P. E. COPE April 25 CARTON 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed Dec. 3, 1956 INVENTOR. L ECOPE, BY my ATTORNEYS.

April 25, 1961 P. E. COPE 2,981,455

CARTON Filed Dec. 3, 1956 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 INVENTOR- ZYUL 5 Cape;

BYQZZMMM ATTO RN EYS.

United States Patent F CARTON Paul E. Cope, Cincinnati, Ohio, assignor to The Procter &f gamble Company, Cincinnati, Ohio, a corporation 0 l0 Filed Dec. 3, 1956, Ser. No. 625,732

Claims. (Cl. 229-14) My invention relates to cartons or boxes and more particularly to a carton with reenforced walls having sift-proof carrying and opening means. 7

Seal end cartons, as commonly known and used today, are usually fabricated from cartonboard or boxboard. These carton materials have been found satisfactory for use in cartons containing moderate quantities of granular or powdered products such as-soap, sugar, flour and the like" but are generally unacceptable when they are filled with over ten pounds of product. One reason for the unsatisfactory behavior of these materials in large cartons is that loads in excess of ten pounds tend to deform the walls due to the physical size of a carton required to hold heavy loads. This makes a carton fabricated from boxboard, cartonboard or similar materials unsatisfactory both from an appearance and storage standpoint. Such large cartons may be constructed of corrugated board to eliminate wall deformation. However, the use of cor rugated board is undesirable because the surface of the corrugated board has a comparatively rough surface making it impractical to attain a clear and distinct multi-color printed design on the surface with present day printing techniques. Thus, it is not possible to decorate a carton with the same attractive and intricate design that can be printed on a cartonboard or boxboard carton even though the corrugated board has more desirable physical properties.

Another disadvantage of known large cartons is that the physical size needed to hold tenor more pounds of product makes the carton unduly large, bulky and difficult to handle forthe individual user. Previous attempts at providing a suitable handle for a'carton ofrelatively large dimensions have had the inherentdisadvantage of allowinga quantity of material to sift through the ,top or filling end of'the carton. Prior handles were also unsatisfactorily mounted causing deformation, undue deflections and tearing of the carton top when carried by It is the general object ofmyinvention to obviate the above difiiculties bythe provision of acarton having features as hereinafter described. p j

A specific object of my invention isthje provision of a carton having strong side walls-so that the carton can be easily handled and stored without deformation of'the side -walls.- a f Another'obje'ct of my invention is to provide a handle at the top of the carton which is attached in a sift-proof manner and may be used for cartons whose contents IWCl gh 'IO-POUIIdS OI more without deforming or i-tearing thetop of the carton when it is being transported;

A /further objectof my inventionsis to provide a carton Oyvjthe. user free access to th ,o the characterdescribed incorporating meansjoropenrt ontnts i'seore'nnes 13n 1'5 with the application of an adhesive Patented Apr. 25, 1961 Another object of my invention is to provide a carton of the character described having a handle which permits the user to carry the carton with no inconvenience due to its size and bulk.

Still another object of my invention resides in the provision of a carton of the character described having a reclosable top.

Briefly stated, in accordance with one aspect of my invention, 1 provide a carton for carrying 10 pounds or more of a product, comprising a carton shell having top flaps and a stiffening panel fitting snugly against and adhesively secured to inner surfaces of the top flaps of the carton. I attach a handle to the panel by suitable means to distribute the carried load over the entire area of the panel and prevent sifting through the panel. I also incorporate a tear strip about the periphery of the carton near the'top portion thereof to permit opening with a minimum of effort to allow a user to have ready access to the contents.

While the specification concludes with claims, particularly pointing out and distinctly claiming the subject matter which I regard as my inven-tion, it is believed the invention will be better understood from the following description taken in connection with the accompanying drawings in which:

Figure 1 is a plan view of the carton blank of my invention.

Figure 2 is a plan view of a liner blank.

Figure 3 is an exploded perspective view showing the assembly of a carton with a liner.

Figure 4 is a side elevation of the panel and handle.

Figure 5 is a bottom plan view of the panel.

Figure 6 is a perspective view showing the manner of assembling the handle to the top of the carton.

Figure 7 is a perspective view of the carton with the top portion severed therefrom.

Figure 8 is a perspective view of one modification of the carton. l V

Figure 9 is a perspective view of a modified handle and panel.

Figure 10 is a bottom view of the handle and panel of Figure 9. p

Referring now to the drawings, Figure 1 shows a car- 'ton blank 10 which may be cut and scored in the manner illustrated from cartonboard, boxboard, or similar materials. Horizontal score lines 11 and 12 are provided. The vertical score lines 13, 14,15 and 16 form respectivelyone sidewall 17, a front wall 18, the second side .wall 19, the rear wall 20 and the glue flap 21. The-cut lines 22, '23 and 24 are provided to demark the bottom inner flaps 25 and 26 and the bottom outer flaps 27 and 28. The cut lines 29, 30, and 31 are provided to demark the top-inner flaps 32 and 33 and the top outer flaps 34 and 35. The top inner flaps 32 and '33 may be provided with T-shaped cutouts 36 and 37 and the top outer flaps 34 and 35 maybe provided with notches 38, 39, 40 and 41. The'purpose of the T-shaped cutouts 36, 37 and the notches 38, 39, 40 and 41 will hereinafter be evident. vThe perforated scores 42 and 43 are substantially parallel to and a short distance below the horizontal score line 11. The perforated scores 42 and 43 form 'a tear. strip 44 for opening the carton. A pressure-sensi- "tive tape 44a which may be reenforced with cotton yarn or similar materials is placed on the inner surface of the-carton blank 10 underlying'the tear strip 44 along th'e .entire length of the carton blank. The tape 44a has been-shown broken ofiin the drawings for illustrative purposes. The not'ches 44b and 440 on the side wall 17 lie o'n either side of the perforated scores 42 and 43 to forrna tear .tabv44d.

Theicarton blank '10 may be folded along the ivertical material to the glue fiap21 so that the glue flap 21 is sealed to the inner portion of the side wall 17 to form a knockdown or collapsed carton as is well known to those skilled in the art. Gluing the flap 21 to the wall 17 in this manner exposes the tear tab 44d at the corner of the cartonafter it is erected as shown in Fig. 3. The structure is erected =or squared up prior to closing the bottom, filling and closing the top. The bottom may thus be formed by first squaring up the rectangular tube, then folding over the bottom inner flaps 25 and 26 along the score line 12 and then adhesively securing in succession the bottom outer flaps 27 and 28 by folding them on the score line 12. The sealing of the bottom flaps may, if desired, be done over a mandrel. Assembly of the carton blank in this manner provides a carton shell 45 as shown in Figure 3 which is then ready for further assembly, filling and closing described hereinafter.

A reenforcing sleeve blank 46, shown in Figure 2, may be formed from corrugated board, solid fiberboard or similar heavy paper material. The material is preferably of a heavier weight than the boxboard, cartonboard or the like as used for making the carton shell 45. The blank 46 for the sleeve has vertical score lines 47, 48 and 49 forming one side wall 51, the front Wall 52, a second side wall 53 and the rear wall 54. The sleeve 55, which may be stored in the form of a flat blank as shown in Figure 3, may be assembled by folding along the score lines 47, 48 and 49 to form a substantially rectangular tube suitable for insertion in the carton shell 45. The sleeve 55 prevents bulging of the side walls of the carton shell 45. The width of each of the walls 51, 52, 53 and 54 when assembled is approximately equal to the inside width of the walls 17, 18, 19 and 20 of the carton shell 45, permitting the sleeve 55 to fit snugly within the carton 45 as shown in Figure 3. The vertical height of the sleeve 55 is such that when the top panel 56 (described hereinafter) is placed on top of the sleeve 55 the total vertical height of the sleeve 55 and the thickness of panel 56, is approximately equal to the inner height of the carton shell 45, allowing the sleeve 55 and panel 56 to fit snugly inside the carton shell 45, and permitting the upper edges of the sleeve walls to support the panel.

A top stiffening panel 56 made from solid fiberboard, corrugated board or similar material is shown in Figure 3. The same heavy material used for making the liner 55 has been found, in practice, to be adaptable in making the panel 56. The dimensions of the panel 56 are preferably approximately equal to the outside cross sectional dimensions of theliner 55. The panel 56 is provided with small holes 57 and 58 which are located at points approximately on the longitudinal center line of the panel 56 and at equal distances from its transverse edges A substantially U-shaped handle 59 having loops 60 and 61 at either end thereof, as best seen in Figures 4 and 5, is inserted through the holes 57 and 58. The handle 59, is bent slightly near the loop ends as at 62 and 63 to permit the handle to be folded over and lie fiat against the top of the carton thus permitting another carton to be stacked upon the top surface. A handle roller 64 assembled on the horizontal portion of the handle 59 permits the user to grip the handle more easily.

The handle 59 is secured to the panel 56 by means of a stiff wire or rod 65 engaging the loops 60 and 61 on the under surface of the panel 56 and extending subpanel 56 having corrugations substantiallyperpendicular to he wi e o qr d 5; makc lan o 1Y1strQflgjand 4 a rigid structure for securing the handle and carrying heavy loads with negligible deflections. It is to be understood, of course, that the handle 59 may be attached to panels fabricated from other types of rigid materials having substantial resistance to bending.

In order to render the carton sift-proof with this handle attaching structure, a tape 66, as shown in Figure 5, is affixed to the bottom of the panel 56. The tape 66 overlies the rod 65, the loops 60 and 61 and the holes 57 and 58 in such a manner as to prevent granular or powdered materials form escaping through the holes provided for insertion of the handle loops. Although for illustrative purposes I have shown the tape 66 broken off, it is to be understood that in practice it extends over the entire length of the rod or wire 65. In practice I have found this structure to be very successful in the prevention of sifting of the contents of the carton through the top thereof. In Figure 6, I have shown the manner of assembling the carton. First the liner 55 is inserted into the carton shell 45 in the manner illustrated in Figure 3. The carton is then filled with product. Next, the panel 56 is placed snugly against the top edge of the sleeve 55 so as to be supported thereby. The top inner flaps 32 and 33 are adhesively secured to the top surface of the panel 56. It is to be noted that the top inner flaps 32 and 33 are provided with T-shaped cutouts 36 and 37, previously described which permit closure of the flaps without interfering with the handle 59 protruding from the panel 56. The configuration of the T-shaped cutouts 36 and 37 is such that the handle 59 may be pivoted without interference from the flaps 32 or 33. Adhesively securing the top inner flaps 32 and 33 to the panel 56 gives the assembled carton greater rigidity and holds the panel 56 in place when the carton is opened for use. Tight sealing of the top flaps to each other and to the panel is possible because the panel is supported peripherally by the sleeve so as to sustain the sealing pressure.

Similarly the top outer flaps 34 and 35 may be adhesively secured to the inner flaps 32 and 33 as shown. The notches 38, 39, 40 and 41 on the outer flaps 34 and 35 also allow pivotal movement of the handle 59 without any interference. Upon sealing the top flaps 32, 33, 34 and 35 the carton may be easily carried about by means the handle 59 until such time as a user wishes to have access to the contents. It is to be noted that sealing the carton in this manner provides a sift-proof closure. The escape of contents around the panel 56 is minimized because the panel may be given a tight fit in the carton body and because the flaps 32, 33, 34 and 35 are adhesively secured to the panel. The tape 66 prevents the escape of any of the contents through the holes 57 and 58 in the panel 56.

The foregoing description illustrates one method of practicing my invention. It is to be understood that other types of carton materials may be used for the carton shell 45 in order to eliminate the need for a liner 55. For example, I may use a carton shell 45 fabricated from corrugated board in order to attain the rigid side walls necessary to prevent bulging and carton deformation and thus eliminate the need for a liner 55. The panel 56 and handle 59 may be attached to a carton shell made from corrugated board in the same manner as heretofore described for the caitonboard or boxboard shell having a corrugated board or fiberboardliner as will be understood by those skilled inthe art. Under present day printing techniques, however, I prefer to use a cartonboard or boxboard shell with a reenforcing liner since a more intricate and ornamental design can be printed on the outside surface of the cartonboard or boxboard as compared to corrugated board. Cartonboard or boxboard presents a much smoother surface to thepr'inting press allowing the use of a much finer screen and thus making it possible; to obtain more detail inf'the printeddesig'n' on the outer surfaces ofthe canon. The mann at} i tachin'g the panel 56 and handle 59 to a corrugated board carton without; a liner would be similar to that previously described for a boxboard or cartonboard shell with a corrugated board or fiberboard liner even though there is no liner for supporting the panel during sealing thereof. The panel may be held against the top flaps by the bandle while the top flaps are being adhesively secured to the panel. Thus, the only structural difference between the use of a corrugated board shell and a cartonboard or boxboard shell is the elimination of the liner. Of course, a liner may be used even with a corrugated board shell if the load conditions on the wallsmake it imperative.

The carton may be opened by grasping the tear tab 44d and pulling thereon so that the tear strip 44 severs the carton in the manner illustrated in Figure 6. Opening the carton in this manner allows the user to remove the upper portion 68 as shown in Figure 7. Removal of the upper portion 68 allows the user to have access to the contents of the carton in the body 69. Since the upper portion 68 consists of that part of the carton lying above the tear strip, it may be used as a cover for reclosing the carton after a portion of the contents have been removed and thereby prevent foreign matter from entering the carton. strip 44 may be removed on 3 sides or may be provided on only 3 sides so that the upper portion 68 will be hinged on the fourth side allowing opening and closingof the carton for access to its contents by merely pivoting the upper portion 68 with respect to the lower portion 69.

This alternative structure is suggested as a modification to that illustrated and will be well understood by those skilled in the art.

Figure 8 illustrates one modification of my invention wherein I provide a heat sealable, pliable thermoplastic bag 70 inserted in the carton shell 45 prior to the insertion of the liner 55. 'The bag 70 may be fabricated from polyethylene or other similar plastic type materials. The bag 70 maybe used for making the contents of the carton completely moisture proof in those instances where even a slight amount of moisture would have an adverse effect on the contents of the carton. In this modification the bag 70 is first placed inside the carton shell 45. The liner 55 is next placed within the bag 70 so that the bag lies between the walls of the carton shell 45 and the liner 55. After the carton is filled, the top of the bag may be heat sealed or tied in a manner well known to those skilled in the art. 7 Upon opening of the carton, the contents may be easily removed as the liner 55 prevents the bag 70 from collapsing and interfering with removal of the contents. The bag 70 may also be used without a liner to aid in making the carton sift-proof as, for example, with the corrugated board shell without a liner as previously described.

Figures 9 and 10 illustrate another type of handle that can be used for carrying my carton. In this modification, the handle 71 is substantially T-shaped as shown on the drawings. The panel 72 is provided with av hole 73 located at the approximate center of the panel. The

handle 71 has a looped end 74 which is inserted through the hole 73. A wire or rod 75 engages the loop 74 on the bottom surface of the panel 72. The wire or rod 75 extends for substantially the full length of the panel 72 and serves to distribute the load of the carton with its contents over the entire area of the panel 72 as was hereinbefore explained for the panel 56 and handle 59. A tape 76 extends over the rod 75 in order to cover the hole 73 and make the structure sift-proof. The tape is shown broken off. for illustrative purposes. The handle 71 may be bent slightly as at 77 to permit the handleto lie flat against the top surface of the carton when not in use.-

It will, of course, be understood that the use of a T- shaped handle 71 will require some, modification in the It will be understood, of course, that the tear sst-45's 6 ber of notches 38, 39, 40 and 41,011 the outer flaps 34 and 35 will also be reduced to one notch'approximately in the center of each flap. The changes in notch size and location are not illustrated in the drawings since the foregoing explanation will serve as an adequate description to those skilled in the art.

While particular embodiments of the invention have been illustrated and described, it will be obvious to those skilled in the art that various changes and modifications may be made without departing from the invention and it is intended to cover in the appended claims all such changes and modifications that come within the true spirit and scope of the invention.

What I claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent of the United States is:

1. A carton comprising in combination a carton shel cut and scored from a blank to form four side walls and a glue flap adjoining the edge of one of the outer walls of said blank and adhesively secured to the lateral edge of the other outer wall of said blank thereby forming a rectangular tube which maybe squared up priorto closing the-bottom, filling, and closingthe top, said blank having two bottom inner flaps and two bottom outer flaps, and two top inner flaps and two top outer flaps all adapted to be folded overthe bottom and top ends, respectively, of the tube and to be fastened inplace to form a carton shell, a tear strip formed near the top of and encircling said carton shell, an inner liner adapted to fit snugly within said carton shell, a rectangular top panel having dimensions approximately equal to the inside cross sectional dimensions of said carton shell and the outside cross sectional dimensions of said liner, said panel placed on said liner inside said top flaps, a handle looped at least atone extremity thereof, said loop passing through a hole in the top panel and being engaged by a stiff rod to secure said handle to said top panel and a size and shape of the T-shaped'cut-outs 36 and 37 such tape secured over theabottom surface ofthe saidtop panel and over said holes in said top panel to render said top panel sift-proof.

- 2. The carton of claim 1, including a bag of a pliable thermoplastic material positioned between the liner and the carton shell.

3. In a carton the combination of a carton blank having four side walls, a top and bottom flap extending from each side wall which may be formed into a carton shell by squaring up said side walls and folding over and adhesively securing the bottom flaps extending from said side walls, a liner adapted to slide into said shell and having its walls lying against the inner surfaces of said side walls of said carton shell, a rectangular top panel lying snugly against the top edge of said liner having dimensions approximately equal to the outer cross sectional dimensions of said liner, a handle having at least one looped end extending through a hole in said panel, means for holding said handle to said panel to distribute the load of said carton over the area of said panel, means including a tape for sealing said openings in said panel,

said top flaps being adhesively secured to said panel to form a sift-proof carton.

4. The carton claimed in claim 3 including a substantially horizontal tear tape located near the top of said carton.

5. The carton claimed in claim 4 including a flexible bag of a pliable thermoplastic material between the carton shell and the liner to render the contents of said carton moisture proof.

6. In a carton the combination of a carton blank having four side walls, a top and bottom flap extending from each side Wall which may be formed into a carton shell by squaring up said side walls, and folding over and adhesively securing the bottom flaps extending from said side walls, a liner adapted to slide into said shell and having its walls'lying against the inner surfaces of said side walls of said carton shell, a rectangular top panel lying snugly against the top edge of said liner having aeaneea 7 dimensions approximately equal to the outer cross-sectional dimensions of said liner, a handle having at least one looped end extending through a hole in said panel, means for preventing siftage through said openings in said panel, said top fiaps being adhesively secured to said panel to form a sift-proof carton.

7. In a carton the combination of a carton blank having four side walls, a top and bottom flap extending from each side wall, which may be formed into a carton shell by squaring up said side walls and folding over and adhesively securing the bottom flaps extending from said side walls, a liner adapted to slide into said shell and having its walls lying against the inner surfaces of said side walls of said carton shell, a rectangular top panel lying snugly against the top edge of said liner having dimensions approximately equal to the outer cross-sectional dimensions of said liner, a handle having at least one end extending through a hole in said panel, means for preventing siftage through said openings in said panel, said top flaps being adhesively secured to said panel to form a sift-proof carton.

8. A carton as claimed in claim 7 wherein the top inner flaps are provided with T-shaped cutouts in order to provide clearance for the portions of the handle which extend through the openings in the panel.

9. A carton as claimed in claim 8 wherein the legs of the handle are bent slightly to permit the handle to be foldled over and lie flat against the top of the carton in order to allow stacking of cartons when the handle is folded down.

10. A carton structure comprising in combination a carton body having four body walls in articulation and end closures at each end thereof, the closure at the top of said carton body being composed of two inner flaps and two outer flaps, said inner flaps being articulated to a pair of opposite body walls of the carton body and being first infolded to overlie the top of said carton body, and said outer flaps being articulated to the remaining pair of opposite body walls and folded into superposed relation overlying said inner flaps and adhesively secured thereto, a separate substantially rigid handle panel juxta posed and secured to the inside surface of said top closure, said handle panel having substantially the same dimensions as the inside dimensions of the carton body and having spaced apart handle receiving openings therein, mating handle receiving openings in said top closure defined by cut-outs in said inner flaps and notches in said outer flaps, a handle member overlying said top closure and comprising a bail the opposite ends of which extend downwardly through said handle receiving openings and terminate in loops, an elongated rod engaging said loop on the under surface of said handle panel to secure said handle member to said handle panel, and means for sealing the openings in said handle panel to prevent siftage of material in said carton through the openings in said handle panel, whereby to provide a sift proof carton structure in which the weight load of the carton, when lifted by said handle member, is distributed throughout the area of said top closure by means of said handle panel.

7 References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 462,541 Evans Nov. 3, 1891 1,158,707 Morton Nov. 2, 1915 2,037,770 Driver Apr. 21, 1936 2,093,616 Mo Sept. 21, 1937 2,278,359 Nagle Mar. 31, 1942 2,296,229 Powell Sept. 15, 1942 2,326,649 Howard Aug. 10, 1943 2,335,913 Buttery Dec. 7, 1943 2,493,337 Buttery Jan. 3, 1950 2,599,708 Gottesman June 10, 1952 2,605,041 Welshenbach July 29, 1952 2,645,408 Eckles July 14, 1953 FOREIGN PATENTS 826,488 Germany J an. 3, 1952

Patent Citations
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3119492 *Nov 29, 1961Jan 28, 1964Du PontTray packages
US3217969 *Dec 5, 1963Nov 16, 1965Hans-Jurgen Schmit-OhlhoffTear-open strips for packages
US4174051 *Jul 26, 1978Nov 13, 1979The Continental Group, Inc.Protective locking flaps for opening in sealed corrugated containers
US4723658 *Jul 21, 1986Feb 9, 1988H. B. Fuller CompanyReclosable carton
US4986420 *Aug 11, 1989Jan 22, 1991The Proctor & Gamble CompanyPackage with multi-ply side panels and strap handle
US5014855 *Nov 13, 1989May 14, 1991Waldorf CorporationFlip top sealed carton with tear filament
US5048687 *Apr 23, 1990Sep 17, 1991Weyerhaeuser CompanyHeat-shrunk protective packaging for multiple units
US5058748 *Dec 29, 1989Oct 22, 1991Lever Brothers Company, Division Of Conopco Inc.Detergent carton
US5238179 *Jan 4, 1993Aug 24, 1993Jefferson Smurfit CorporationTop opening carton with integral internal handle
US5492270 *Jul 19, 1994Feb 20, 1996Georgia-Pacific CorporationShipping container
US20110284548 *Dec 12, 2009Nov 24, 2011Puma Aktiengesellschaft Rudolf Dassler SportTransport box and/or sales box for a sport article and system comprising such a box and a bag
US20120261463 *Apr 16, 2012Oct 18, 2012William Mitchell ScottStrengthening insert for a box
Classifications
U.S. Classification229/210, 229/238, 229/117.23
International ClassificationB65D5/54
Cooperative ClassificationB65D5/5445
European ClassificationB65D5/54C