Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2981549 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateApr 25, 1961
Filing dateJan 16, 1959
Priority dateJan 16, 1959
Publication numberUS 2981549 A, US 2981549A, US-A-2981549, US2981549 A, US2981549A
InventorsRichardson Hotton George
Original AssigneeRichardson Hotton George
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Mobile tool stand
US 2981549 A
Images(1)
Previous page
Next page
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

April 1961 G. R. HOTTON 2,981,549

MOBILE TOOL STAND Filed Jan. 16, 1959 1W? W & Z1 02? BY W 2 1tools, or the like are kept. 'more and more to enable a workman to carry the ma or- United States Patent MOBILE TOOL STAND George Richardson Hotton, 3933 W. 63rd St., Chicago 29, Ill.

Filed Jan. 16, 1959, Ser. No. 787,149

2 Claims. (Cl. 280--47.35)

The present invention relates to a mobile tool stand. The use of mobile tool stands by construction men, maintenance men, etc., is becoming more and more prevalent. No matter what trade is involved, e.g. ma-

chine repair, electrician, assembly, machinist, rigger, 'pipefitter, etc., it has been found that a substantial amount of time is lost when as a particular job progresses a workman must go from the spot where it is necessary to do the work to some other location where supplies, Tool stands are being used ity of his needs with him as he moves from job to job. In many instances such stands are provided with a working space across the top. Usually they will have drawers, parts bins, etc., depending upon the needs of the particular trade or job being carried out by the user of the stand.

The mobile stands in use today have a number of disadvantages, the worst of which is their lack of mobility.

Mobility, of course, should be one of their most im- If the stand is being used by the con- An' airplane mechanic working around the :making a step, etc. In substantially any job where these tmobile tool stands are desirable there will be occasions where the user will encounter similar obstacles. It is time consuming for the worker to remove the obstacle or endeavor to work his way around it. At the same time with a heavily loaded tool stand it is likely to be a job for several people to work the'tool stand over such an obstacle.

The principal object of the present invention is to provide a mobile tool stand which a single individual can easily walk over such common obstacles as previously discussed. Important features of my invention are: the ease with which this walking over obstacles can be performed by a workman even though the stand may be heavily loaded; the fact that the structure I have devised for doing this does not materially affect the cost of a mobile tool stand; and the attractive appearance that the structure gives to the stand. In my invention this is achieved by the use of wheels which are quite differently positioned from the wheels used in prior art structures in combination with-a handle structure serving both as a push bar for moving the stand and as a lever for walking the stand over obstacles.

The novel features which I believe to be characteristic of my invention are set forth with particularity in the appended claims. My invention itself, however, together with further objects and advantages thereof, will best be understood by reference to the following description taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings in which:

Figure 1 is a perspective view of an embodiment of my invention;

Figure 2 is an enlarged view of an end showing the handle mounting therefor;

Figure 3 is a partial view of a side illustrating the wheel positioning; and

Figure 4 is a section taken at line 4-4 of Figure 3.

In the embodiment illustrated in the drawings the stand includes end panels 10 and 11, side panel 12, amp 13 and a bottom 14. Each of these parts fits together with the adjacent parts and all are welded together to form a unitary frame assembly. This frame is further strengthened by a rectangular angle iron member about and within the base, as defined by bottom 14, as will be seen in Figure 4. In this embodiment, one side is open with portions of end panels 10 and 11 being bent. about that side to provide a trim attractive appearance.

The base of the open side is trimmed and strengthened by the lower front brace 16. A plurality of drawers 17 are mounted on guides and positioned at the open side. These are shown for the purpose of illustration in the disclosed embodiment and in actual practice one or more of the drawer spaces might be bins, shelves, etc., depending on the needs of the user of the tool stand. All or a portion of the space occupied by the side panel 12 similarly could be provided with storage space.

The handle, generally 19, is formed in the shape of an elongated U-shape tube, having a closed end 20 and two sides 21 and 22. Sides 21 and 22 extend the full length of the stand between ends 10 and 11 immediately below the top 13. Each of ends 10 and 11 are provided with spaced flanges 23 to receive and support handle 19. These flanges are welded to ends 10 and 11 and serve to distribute the load that may be placed on the handle, as hereinafter discussed, over the surface of the end panel. Flanges 23 are provided 'with set screws 24 to permit the fixing of the position of the handle 19 with respect to the body of the stand. The extending ends of sides 21 and 22 are provided with caps 25 to improve their appearance and eliminate any raw edges.

The running gear of the tool stand includes a pair of large wheels 30, each of which are rotatably mounted on an end respectively of an'axle 31. Axle 31 is mounted in holes in bottom pan 14 and angle iron base 15. The axles are held in place by a cotter key 32 passing therethrough. Immediately adjacent end 11 of the stand are a pair of casters generally 34. Each caster is positioned at a corner of the stand. The casters are of conventional construction comprising a wheel 35 mounted on an axle 36 attached to a yoke 37. Yoke 37 is rotatable with respect to the top 38 of the caster; which top is affixed to the frame of the stand. The total height of the caster below the bottom of the frame of the stand should equal the distance from the bottom of the frame to the bottom of Wheels 30, so that the stand normally will be level when positioned on a level base or floor.

An important feature of my invention is the positioning of axle 31 with respect to the frame of the stand. The axle should be sufiiciently low with respect to the frame that a substantial portion of wheel 30 extends below the bottom of the frame. This is important not only to tilting the stand for walking over obstacles, as hereinafter discussed, but also from the standpoint of providing clearance for wheels 30 to walk over obstacles.

Secondly, the position of axle 31 with respect to center line 40 of the stand is most important. Center line 40 is the imaginary line halfway between ends 10 and 11 of the stand. I have found that the most desirable positioning of axle 31 with respect to center line 40 for most general applications is to make this distance between center line 40 and axle 31 15% of the total length of the stand between ends 10 and 11. For some applications this distance can be varied but in no event should the distance between center line 40 and axle 31 Patented Apr. 25, 1961 be less than of the length of the stand between ends 10 and 11 and in no event should it be more than 20% of the length of .the stand. There are very important. reasons for staying within these limitations. In the first place when the distance between center line 40 and axle 31 is less than 10%, wheel 35 of caster 34 cannot be raised sufficiently to walk over anything more than the lowest of obstacles. The stand certainly will not Walk over those obstacles normally encountered in use. The limitation in this regard is imposed by the fact that the rear of the frame, as represented by the bottom line of end 10, strikes the fioor before wheels 35 have been tilted sufiiciently in the air. Another reason for observing this 10% limitation is that if axle 31 is any closer to center line 40 the stand is too evenly balanced on wheels 30. It loses its stability and bounces and joggles along. This not only makes the stand awkward and irritating to handle but in addition it tends to scatter things about the drawers and create more disarray than is necessary.

Conversely, a distance between center line 40 and axle 31 should not be greater than 20% than the distance between ends 10 and 11 for the reason that the stand then cannot be made to walk over obstacles by the average person. By moving axle 31 back beyond the 20% limitation the total weight of the stand becomes too evenly distributed on wheels 35 and wheels 30. Thus, when it is necessary to tilt the stand to walk the front wheels 35 over an obstacle, a substantially greater force is necessary than is the case when one stays within the 20% limitation. While a person could obtain additional leverage to overcome this additional force by using a longer handle 19, that is by having a long lever arm out beyond end 10, that long handle would make the tool stand awkward and unwieldy. Without a long lever arm the person of average strength would have exceptional difliculty in maneuvering a loaded stand.

A further factor in obtaining the desirable characteristics of my invention is in the relationship of the diameter of wheels 30 to the length of the stand between ends 10 and 11. The diameter of wheels 30 should be no less than 25% of the length of the stand between ends 10 and 11 and in no event should they be more than 50% of the length of the stand. With wheel sizes smaller than 25% the wheels 30 have to be lifted too much when it is necessary to get them over an obstacle. They do not obtain an inclined plane effect in stepping up onto the obstacle as a result of their being pushed against that article. In no event should the wheels 30 have a diameter greater than 50% of the length of the stand. Not only would the diameter above this be exorbitant from a cost standpoint but it would occupy too great a space and diminish the useable volume of storage space of the stand. Preferably, the size of wheels 30 should be about 35% of the length of the stand between ends 10 and 11.

It is believed that from the foregoing remarks and description the operation of the stand of my invention is readily apparent. However, further description undoubtedly is not amiss. After inserting the tools, supplies, etc. in the various receptacles of the stand to fit the particular requirements, such as drawer 17, a workman wheels the stand from one place to another to take care of the job required at these various places. As an obstacle, such as a plank, is encountered the front wheels 35 are walked over the obstacle by pushing down on handle 19, thus lifting wheels 35 sufiiciently high to step on or over the obstacle encountered. The downward pressure will also have a forward component so that the stand will continue to roll forward. As soon as wheels 35 have cleared the obstacle, or walked up on top thereof as in the case of a step, the downward pressure on handle 19 may be discontinued. As the stand is rolled forward the momentum of the forward motion will cause wheels 30, because of the size, to step up onto the smaller obstacles and cause them to roll across the obstacle once having arrived at the top thereof. As the obstacles become larger the workers may find it desirable to supplement the force of the momentum by lifting up on handle 19. It will not be necessary to lift on handle 19 sufiiciently to raise wheels 30 off the ground inasmuch as this lifting force is merely supplementing the upward step achieved by the momentum of the cart as the wheels strike the obstacle. In any event it will be apparent from the foregoing description that in lifting up on the handle 19 so as to reduce the weight on wheels 30 there is a mechanical advantage in the backward extension of handle 19 in respect to what will be the pivot point, namely the axis of wheels 35.

The length of the extension of handle 19 rearwardly of end 10 may be adjusted by loosening set screws 24 and moving the handle in the desired direction. Preferably, the handle 19 should extend at neither end anymore than is necessary to walk the cart along as hereinbefore described. Any greater extension merely increases the awkwardness resulting from the space occupied by the cart and handle. With wheel positioning as hereinbefore outlined, handle 19 need not be exceptionally long yet an average individual without straining himself can supply the force necessary to walk the cart over the usual obstacles that will be encountered.

The foregoing description is for the purpose of complying with 35 USC 112 and should not be construed as imposing unnecessary limitations upon the appended claims, inasmuch as variations of my invention within the scope of the claims will be apparent to those skilled in the art.

What I claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent of the United States is:

1. A mobile tool stand to be supported on a floor which may have various low obstacles thereupon for use by a workman to bring tools to the place where work is to be performed and to provide a work table, said stand comprising: a box-like body having two end panels, a side panel and a flat work-top supported on said panels; a plurality of drawers within said body, accessible at the other side of the body, and extending the length of said body between said ends whereby the loads of the drawers will be relatively evenly distributed along the length of the body; two pair of tubular guides having an opening therethrough, one pair being spaced and affixed to a first end panel and the other pair being spaced and affixed to a second end panel in alignment with the first pair, said guides being positioned with their openings horizontal, below said top, and above the uppermost of the drawers; a tubular U shaped handle extending through said openings with the base of the U beyond one of said ends and the two legs of the U extending beyond the other of the ends; means to releasably afiix said handle in said guides; a cap larger than said openings affixed to the end of one of said legs beyond said other end panel; a pair of wheels rotatably mounted about an axis on said body, said wheels extending below said body and being parallel to said sides of said body with said axis normal to said sides, said axis being positioned between one of said ends and the mid-point between said ends, the dis tance between said axis and said mid-point being between 10 percent and 20 percent of the distance between said ends, the diameter of said wheels being substantially greater than the distance between the body and the floor; and rotatable means attached to said body and positioned immediately adjacent the other of said ends to normally support said other of said ends.

2. A mobile tool stand to be supported on a floor which may have various low obstacles thereupon for use by a workman to bring tools to the place where work is to be performed and to provide a work table, such stand comprising: a box-like body having two end panels, a side panel and a fiat work-top supported on said panels; a plurality of drawers within said body, accessible at the other side of the body, and extending the length 5 of said body between said ends whereby the loads of the drawers will be relatively evenly distributed along the length of the body; two pair of tubular guides having an opening therethrough, one pair being spaced and alfixed to a first end panel and the other pair being spaced and aflixed to a second end panel in alignment with the first pair, said guides being positioned with their openings horizontal, below said top and above the uppermost of the drawers; a tubular U shaped handle extending through said openings with the base of the U beyond one of said ends and the two legsof the U extending beyond the other of the ends; means to releasably aifix said handle in said guides; a cap larger than said openings aflixed to the end of one of said legs beyond said other end panel; a pair of wheels rotatably mounted about an axis on said body, said wheels extending below said body and being parallel to said sides of said body \m'th said axis normal to said sides, said axis being positioned between one of said ends and the midpoint between said ends, the distance between said axis and said mid-point 6 being between 10 percent and percent of the distance between said ends, the diameter of said wheels being substantially greater than the distance between the body and the floor and being between percent and '50 percent of said distance between said ends; and rotatable means attached to said body and positioned immediately adjacent the other of said ends to normally support said other of said ends at a level such that the top is generally horizontal.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 904,175 Brown Nov. 17, 1908 919,729 .Kleine Apr. 27, 1909 1,042,193 Bowling Oct. 22, 1912 1,097,163 Brown May 19, 1914 1,149,639 Doust Aug. 10, 1915 1,221,997 Koebler Apr. 10, 1917 1,455,395 Exum May 15, 1923 2,424,644 Barrett July 29, 1947

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US904175 *Jul 1, 1907Nov 17, 1908Robert S BrownWork-rack.
US919729 *Nov 17, 1908Apr 27, 1909William E KleineBag or can carrier.
US1042193 *Mar 21, 1912Oct 22, 1912Lilian BowlingGo-cart handle.
US1097163 *Jun 27, 1912May 19, 1914New Britain Machine CoTool-rack.
US1149639 *Jan 15, 1914Aug 10, 1915William J Doust JrTruck.
US1221997 *Mar 16, 1916Apr 10, 1917Frank G KoehlerTruck.
US1455395 *Aug 31, 1921May 15, 1923Exum Mary EPortable serving table
US2424644 *Mar 1, 1946Jul 29, 1947Barrett Howard JJanitor's truck
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3093387 *Feb 28, 1961Jun 11, 1963Nathan Schwartz & Sons IncMaterials-handling truck
US3218090 *Sep 20, 1963Nov 16, 1965Herman Ralph EUtility cart
US3366396 *Oct 22, 1965Jan 30, 1968Bernard E. HardyWorkman's cart for floor filing
US3451737 *Sep 5, 1967Jun 24, 1969Hazet Werk Zerver HermannTool carriage particularly for repair shops or the like
US3482894 *Dec 19, 1967Dec 9, 1969Umc IndCabinet with casters and leveling means
US3670156 *Oct 5, 1970Jun 13, 1972Donald R SchmidtPortable work stand cabinet and illumination source unit
US3771848 *Mar 1, 1972Nov 13, 1973Claywell JTool chest
US3861767 *Feb 26, 1973Jan 21, 1975James Edwin MeadTrash receptacle device
US4118048 *Apr 8, 1977Oct 3, 1978Seiko Time CorporationWheeled sample case
US4120549 *Apr 27, 1977Oct 17, 1978Harvey Lee BureauSheet metal tool chest support with sliding work shelf
US4693526 *Jan 4, 1982Sep 15, 1987Whirlpool CorporationAppliance support
US4758057 *May 29, 1987Jul 19, 1988Whirlpool CorporationAppliance support
US4976450 *Jun 26, 1989Dec 11, 1990Ellefson Laurence MMobile tool chest with horizontal pivotal trays
US5028099 *Aug 8, 1990Jul 2, 1991Bertucco Leonard JTrash recycling container
US5152542 *Apr 2, 1990Oct 6, 1992Devoe Armand HClassroom traveler cart
US5183372 *Feb 12, 1991Feb 2, 1993Daniel DinvernoVan-mounted service carts for skilled tradesmen
US5240264 *Jan 27, 1992Aug 31, 1993Williams Thomas LContainers on folding wheels and method
US5533799 *Feb 6, 1995Jul 9, 1996Nickolaus, Jr.; Edward L.Spray painter's cabinet
US5611553 *May 12, 1995Mar 18, 1997Schoeman; FrederickElectronic game storage cart
US5806868 *Oct 7, 1996Sep 15, 1998Sumner Manufacturing Co., Inc.Manual cart for loading, transporting and unloading long or heavy objects
US5833250 *Mar 15, 1996Nov 10, 1998Schierjoy, Ltd.Garden cart
US6022033 *Sep 24, 1997Feb 8, 2000Lawson Screen Products, Inc.Universal cart for printing accessories
US6024427 *Apr 21, 1998Feb 15, 2000Kimball International, Inc.Mobile office furniture pedestal unit with handle and auxiliary worksurface and storage
US6129366 *Dec 10, 1998Oct 10, 2000Wenger CorporationMobile teaching station
US6176559Nov 4, 1999Jan 23, 2001500 Group Inc.Rolling containers assembly
US6601861Jun 13, 2000Aug 5, 2003Wenger CorporationMobile teaching station
US7144020Dec 24, 2003Dec 5, 2006Professional Tool Products, LlcService cart with protective bumpers and recessed drawer handles
US7296808Jun 28, 2006Nov 20, 2007Professional Tool Products, LlcService cart with recessed drawer handles
US8191910Apr 15, 2008Jun 5, 2012The Stanley Works Israel Ltd.Containers and container system
Classifications
U.S. Classification280/47.35, 312/249.5, 312/351.11, 280/79.2, 312/249.12, 280/47.371
International ClassificationA47B31/00
Cooperative ClassificationA47B31/00
European ClassificationA47B31/00