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Publication numberUS2982400 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 2, 1961
Filing dateApr 7, 1958
Priority dateApr 7, 1958
Publication numberUS 2982400 A, US 2982400A, US-A-2982400, US2982400 A, US2982400A
InventorsAndre Noble
Original AssigneeAndre Matic Machinery Company
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Multi-can carrier and package
US 2982400 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

May 2, 1961 N. ANDRE 2,982,400

MULTI-CAN CARRIER AND PACKAGE Filed April 7, 1958 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 NOBL E ANDRE ZWWZ ATTORNEYS N. ANDRE MULTI-CAN CARRIER AND PACKAGE May 2, 1961 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed April 7, 1958 1 IN ENTOR. NOBLE ANDRE BY W Wm! ATTORNEVS Uniwd S ates Pateflf an open-ended cardboard sleeve to provide a'package of cans adapted to be handled and carried as aunit.

' fiatented May 2, 1961,

A still; further objectof the invention is the provision of a multi-can package, having a convenient handle for carrying the package, and which handle is flat against the package so as not to interfere in any manner with the fillingof a case with a plurality of packages and in which the handle will not become distorted, torn or bent in the packing of a case with a plurality of the packages in side by side and superposed relation.

A still further object of the invention is the provision of a package that includes an open-ended sleeve tightly holding a plurality of cans together, and which sleeve is formed with means for readily removing the same to ex- Multi-can packages of this general type, ineach of which a substantially oblong blank of cardboard is folded along parallel lines extending perpendicular to the longi-. tudinal axis of the sheet to form a rectangular open-ended sleeve or carrier for holding a pair of parallel rows of upright cylindrical cans therein, are old.

V In most carriers of this type, the chimes of the cans enter slits or openings at the junctures between adjacent walls of the sleeve and the sleeve is drawn tightly around the rows before theends of. the oblong blank are secured togetherso that the chimes will tend to be held in said slits, oropenings, thereby holding the cans of the rows against movement out of the open ends ofthe sleevecarrien'. This system has its objections in not being ab: solutely secure, for the reason thatthe chimes are quite narrow, and there is a'possibility of the'chimes at the adjacent sides of the row slipping over each other, result-I ing in the chimes on one or more of the cans slipping out of the slits in the sleeve. In many of the sleeves for carrying cans, ithas heretofore been customary to form finger openings in a side of each sleeve positioned so that two fingers on the hand. of a person can be slipped through the openings to carry the package of cans. This is fairly satisfactory, but many persons do, not know the. purpose of the finger openings,

' and also the openings are not necessarily conveniently positioned for all sizes of hands. Furthermore, the entire weight of the cans, must be takenby the two fingers of"a.hand,which makes it tiring to carry a package for more, thana relatively short time.

' Some. attempts to provide a structure 'for retaining cans in generally sleeve-likecarriers, in a different manner'than by use ofj the chime receiving slits, have employed straps extending across the opposite open ends of the carrier, and secured at their ends to walls of the pose the cans for individual handling thereof. Other objects and advantages will appear in the description and drawings. V .In the drawings, Fig. l is a perspective view of a pack age looking upwardly from below the latter. V Fig. 2' is a perspective view of a package as seen from above;

1 Fig. 3is a sectional view of the strap of Fig. 1 as seen from line 3-3 of Fig. 1.

Fig. 4-is a reduced side view of the package showing the same beinglifted by a hand grasping the handle.

;Fig. 5 is an, end view of the package of Fig. 4. Fig. .6 is a fragmentary sectional view of an upper end 1 portion ofthepackage as seen from line 6--6 of Fig. 2.

i Fig. 7 is a fragmentary sectional view taken along line 7-7 of Fig. 5.

Fig. 8 is a fragmentary top plan view of the package as seen from line 8--8 of Fig. 4. I Fig; 9 is a plan view of the blank from which the sleeve-like carrier is formed.

Except for modifications that will be pointed out in the description, the blank 1 from which the carrier is formed (Fig. 9) isthe same as theblank shown in my co-pending application Serial No. 557,885, filed January 9, 1956; now .Patent. No. 2.926,782.,

.The blank iszsubstantially oblong, except that the corners are rounded, and is formed with spaced, parallel folding creases extending thereacross normal to the longitudinal axisof the blank. The central pair of folding carrier; and other attempts have required can engaging extensions on the walls of the cartons, while still others use fl aps on the carton walls that project into the end recesses on the cans to engagethe inner sides of the chimes on the end cans. None of these efforts have utilized handle structure for holding the cans in the sleeve,'and none haveprovided a comfortable fiat, baillike handle that does not require bending, folding or other movement to'dispose the handle out of the way in load ing cases with the packages or in positioning the packages in superposed relation on top of each other.

One of the objects of this invention is the provision of a package in which-the carrying handle holds the cans creases 2 define opposite edges of a central panel 3 that willconstitute the horizontal top wall of the open ended sleeve to be formed.

- Equally spaced from folding creases 2 in directions toward the ends of the blank 1 are folding creases 4;

. perpendicular to the top 'wall 3, the panels 7 would each extend halfway across the space between creases 4.

The end marginal portions 8 along the end edges of the blank lare outwardly of creases 6 and constitute end sections that are adapted to be folded .to abutting relation and projecting toward the central or top wall 3 of the carrier when said panels 7 are in opposed relation to the central panel 3. Since these panels 7 are adjacent to the ends of the blank, they may be termed end panels and the marg nal portions 8 may be called the end sections;

The space between creases 2 is preferably slightly less than the sum'of the maximum diameters of a pair of cans', such as indicated at 9 in Figs. 1 to 3, at their chimes. This central panel 3 between creases Z is formed with tabs 10 that are respectively adapted to'be folded upwardly to positions perpendicular to said central panel along aligned folding creases 11 that are positioned centrally between creases 2 and parallel with the latter. The width of the blank 1 is substantially equal to the combined diameters of a plurality of cans disposed in a row parallel with creases 2, 11. In the example illustrated, the said width is substantially equal to the combined diameters of three cans 9.

The tabs 10 are positioned so they will come between the chimes at one of the ends of the cans 9 that are disposed in two rows extending transversely across the blank. When such cans are in this position,'t-he end cans in the rows are even with or substantially even with the side edges of the blank and the chimes on thecans of said rows will extend across the lines of creases 2. In order to permit the walls .8, or panels 5, to be bent to opposed positions perpendicular to the central panel 3 and tightly against the outermost surfaces of "the walls of the cans between their chimes, the blank is formed with spaced arcuately extending cuts 13 along cre'ases 2, which arcuate cuts extend into the panels 5', and short end cuts 14 extend into central panel 3 from the ends of the arcuate cuts 13. By this structure, the chimes on the cans of said rows that are at the cuts 13 will project through the panels 5 at their junctures with central panel 3 when the walls 5 are folded against the outermost sides of the cans of said rows, and when the adjacent chimes of the cans are in engagement with tabs 10.

The same structure, consisting of slits 15 and end cuts 16 are along the creases 4. The slits 15 extend into panels 5 and the short cuts 16 extend into panels 7, so that the chimes at theends of the cans opposite to those at slits 13 will project through panels 5- at their junctures with end panels 7.

The end sections 8 will extend between the chimes of the cans of the pair of rows when sa.d-' sections are in abutting relation, and the edges of the end panels 7' along creases 6 will then be in abutting relation.

From the foregoing, it will be apparent that the blank when tightly folded about a pair of rows of cans 9, and when the walls or panels 5 are against'the portions of the sides of the cans that are between the. end chimes. the cans will be relatively secure withn the blank. provided the end sections 8 are held between the rows of cans.

Generally T-shaped tabs 18 are formedin one of the end sections 8. The leg of each tab is integrally joined with the adjacent end panel 7 along a line coincidental with the folding crease 6, but the latter does not extend across each leg. Hence when the end-section 8 in which tabs 18 are formed is bent at r.ght angles to the adjacent panel 7, the tab will remain coplanar with the panel 7 with which it is integral, and will extend over'the other panel "1' that is at the other end of the blank when the sleeve is formed with the sections 8 in abutting relation. The portion of said other panel 7 that .s' below each tab 18 is stamped to form an opening 20 of a width equal to substantially the width of the leg of each T-tab 18 so that the heads of the tabs overlying the openings defined by the edges 20 may be sprung through the openings so they will be positioned. below the panel 7 in which said openings are formed.

The foregoing operation assumes that the panels 7 are uppermost in the process of forming the package up. to and including the step of springing the heads of tabs 18 through the openings 20, which is the case. Later, and in carrying the package, the panels 7 form the bottom of the. package.

A handle 21 may be in the form of a paper stripthat is formed by folding the longitudinally extending marginal portions 22 thereof (Fig. 3.) aga.nst thecentral. portion, thus forming a strap. thatis strong and that. has smooth edges.

'. The central portion of strap 21 extendsstraight across the central panel 3 midway between creases 2 and then portions 23 of the strap extendstraight. across the open ends of the sleeve centrally thereof so as to be inlapping relation to the adjacent portions of the two end cans at each of the ends of the row, and the terminating end portions 24 (Fig. I) extend over the adjacent marginal portions of the two panels 7 and are adhered to said marginal portions.

Figs. 1 and 2 show the strap so secured to the package that includes the cans. Only the end portions 24 are secured to the sleeve, and it is obvious that these end portions also inseparably secure the 'end' panels 7 together against separation and also positively hold the end sections 8 between the rows of cans irrespective of whether or not the tabs 18 and openings 20 are present. Since the ends of the' end portions 24 also may extend over the tabs 18 and openings 20, as seen in Fig. 1, so under no circumstances will the tabs spring out to interfere with the handling of the packages. With this 'structure, any suitable temporary connection may be used instead of tabs 18 and' openings 20 to hold the endsections 8.between' the rows of cans, until the straps are applied, or they may even be omitted, if desired, if it is found to be more convenient to apply the straps without regard for the tabs. Usually the blank is formed with the tab-locking means described to enable the optional use of the handles and where the tab-locking means is not us d, the ends 24 of strap 21 may be used without interference by the tab-locking means.

With the carrier or package filled with cans 9 and with strap 21 in position, the fingers of the hand'25 may be inserted between the handle and the top panel 3 for carrying the cans. The portion of the top panel 3 will, in this case, be sprung inwardly generally toward' the cans a sufficient degree to enable the fingers to be inserted below the handle. The cans will be held in the carton by reason of their chimes. extending through the slits in the walls 5, and also by reason of the fact thatthe cans cannot pass the straps should the cans, for any reason become loos'ned in the sleeve. However, a preferable structure would be the provision of frangible sections 26 along the free edges of the. panel. 3 at the points where the. strap 25 extends across said edges. These sections may extendinto the, panel 3 and toward each other a sufficient distance to be swung downwardly from their inner ends along folding creases 27, a sufii- Y cient distance to engage the adjacent end cans of the two rows of cans. The bending or downward swinging of said tabs into engagement with the end cans of the two rows will only occur when the-fingers of the hand are inserted between the strap and. panel 3 and the weight of the cans is placed on the handle. Thus the can retaining or blocking tabs 26 become operative to hold the cans when the package is lifted by the handle, and the handle will move into the recess formed by the. binding of these tabs toward the-cans. The strap and' the tabs will cooperate to tighten the cans inthe. package by the force applied at the ends of the rows by the straps when the package is lifted by the handle to place the latter under lifting tension.

From the foregoing it is seenthat the handle coacts with the sleeve and cans (l) to positively secure'the sleeve around the cans in'a fiat tautcondition on the sieve so as not to project therefrom, nor to require bending or folding in stacking the packages and (2) to prevent the possibility of loosened cansfalling out of the open ends of the sleeve and. (3) to force the tabs 26 against the end cans when the package is lifted by the handle, and furthermore the bendale end tabs enable the handle to slacken to facilitate the insertionof the fingers between the handle and the package.

The portions 23 of the strap are approximately in the same plane as the end edges of the sleeve. before. the handle is lifted and thereafter they are'in a plane that is inclined relative to the plane in which said end edges are positioned as seen in Fig. 7. The end edges of said sleeve are substantially in the same plane as the outermost peripheral surfaces of the end cans at ends of the rows thereof, which is desirable since the ends of the cans are then covered by the carrier or sleeve.

An important feature of the invention is the provision of a tear strip 28 in the top of the sleeve and over one row of the cans 9. This tear strip terminates at its ends within the top panel 3 and the portion disposed between parallel lines of V-shaped slits 29. These lines of slits extend transversely across the blank as seen in Fig. 9, and a pair of parallel straight slits 30 respectively at the ends of the rows of slits 29 are in extension of said rows and are connected at their outer ends by a cross cut 31. Thus each pair of slits 30 and the cross cut at their outer ends define the edges of a pull tab 32 that is connected with each end of the tear strip 28.

In order that the pull tab can readily be grasped between the fingers of a hand, a portion 33 of the panel 3 between each tab 32 and'the adjacent free edge of the panel 3 is bendable inwardly into the sleeve by reason of slits 34 that extend arcuately generally toward each other and toward said free edge from the ends of the cross cut 31. The stock of the panel 3 between the relatively closely positioned outer ends of the arcuate cuts or slits 33 provide very little resistance to the inward bending of the portions 34 by a finger of the hand so that two fingers, such as the thumb and forefinger, can readily grasp either of the end tabs 30 for pulling the tear strip from the panel 3 and thereby quickly opening the sleeve from end to end to obtain access to the cans.

It is to be understood that the foregoing detailed description is for the purpose of describing an example of the invention, and such descriptionis not to be considered as necessarily restricting the invention to the precise structure illustrated.

I claim:

1. A multi-can package comprising: a pair of parallel rows of upright cans in side by side relation; a rectangular sleeve formed from a single cardboard blank substantially enclosing said rows; said sleeve having a top wall, a bottom wall, a pair of opposed vertical side walls and opposite open ends; said sidewalls having upper and lower edges extending longitudinally of said rows integrally joined to said top and bottom walls; said bottom wall being in two parts providing a pair of substantially horizontal coplanar panels each extending over the lower ends of the cans of one of said rows from a line parallel with and midway between said lower edges of said side walls; means integral with one of said panels extending vertically between said pair of rows' between the lower ends of the cans thereof; a carrying strap disposed from end to end thereof in a vertical plane that is between said rows; said strap having opposite terminating end portions secured flat against said pair of panels at opposite sides of said line and said plane securing said panels together and holding said means between the pair of rows of cans at their lower ends; said strap extending vertically from said panels across the open ends of said sleeve and over ,said top wall from one open end of said can to the other,

the length of said strap between said end portions being free from securement to said cans and to said top wall whereby the fingers of a hand may be inserted between said top wall and the portion of the strap extending thereover from said one open end to the other for carrying said cans by said last mentioned portion.

2. A multi-can packagecomprising: a pair of parallel rows of upright cans in side by side relation; a rectangular sleeve formed from a single cardboard blank substantially enclosing said rows; said sleeve having a top wall, a bottom wall, a pair of opposed vertical side walls and opposite open ends; said sidewalls having upper and lower edges extending longitudinally of said rows integrally joined to said top and bottom walls; said bottom wall being in two parts providing a pair of substantially horizontal coplanar panels each extending over the lower ends of the cans of one of said rows from a line parallel with and midway between said lower edges of said side walls; means integral with one ofsaid panels extending vertically between said pair of rows between the lower ends of the cans thereof; a carrying strap disposed from end to end thereof in a vertical plane that is between said rows; said strap havingopposite terminating end portions secured flat against said pair of panels at opposite sides of said line and said plane securing said panels together and holding said means between the pair of rows of cans at their lower ends; said strap extending vertically from said panels across the open ends of said sleeve and over said top wall from one open end of said can to the other, the length of said strap between said end portions being free from securement to said cans and to said top wall whereby the fingers of a hand may be inserted between said top Wall and the portion of the strap extending thereover from said one open end to the other for carrying said cans by said last mentioned portion, means frangibly connecting the parts of said top wall below said end portions of said strap and at the open ends of said sleeve with the remainder of said top wall for movement relative to said remainder downwardly'and substantially into engagement with the end cans of said rows upon tensioning said strap under the weight of the cans upon said cans and sleeve being suspended from the portion of said strap extending over said top wall when said portion is lifted by a hand inserted between said last mentioned portion and said top wall.

3. A multi-can package comprising: a pair of parallel rows of cans in side by side relation; a rectangular sleeve adapted to substantially enclose said rows; said sleeve having a top wall and a bottom wall respectively extending over the upper ends and the lower ends of said cans; a pair of opposed vertical side walls integrally joining said top wall and said bottom wall along the upper and lower edges of said side walls and extending over the oppositely outwardly facing sides of said pair of rows; said bottom wall being in two parts providing a pair of substantially coplanar panels each extending over the lower ends of the cans of one of said rows from a line parallel with and midway between the lower edges of said side walls; a pair of terminating end sections each being integral with one of said panels, extending between said rows at the lower ends of said cans and in a vertical plane substantially centrally between said pair of rows, a strap having opposite end portions extending to opposite sides of said line and said plane and across said terminating end sections secured to said pair of panels securing the latter together and holding said end sections between the cans of said rows; said strap extending from said end portions thereof and in said plane Vertically across the open ends of said sleeve and horizontally across the upper surface of said top wall from one open end of said sleeve to the other, the portion of said strap extending across said top wall being free from securement to the latter to enable the fingers of a hand to be slipped between said top wall and said last mentioned portion for manually carrying said sleeve and the cans therein by said last mentioned portion.

' References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 960,311 Greenberg June 7, 1910 1,909,368 Lloyd May 16, 1933 2,359,298 Brogden Oct. 3, 1944 2,765,073 Murray Oct. 2, 1956 2,783,690 Crary Mar. 5, 1957 2,810,476 Guyer Oct. 22, 1957 2,818,171 Andre Dec. 31, 1957 FOREIGN PATENTS 507,910 Italy J an. 4, 1955

Patent Citations
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US2783690 *Aug 17, 1953Mar 5, 1957Paper Strap IncHandled open end can carton
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IT507910B * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3128010 *Feb 12, 1962Apr 7, 1964Mead CorpBottle carrier
US3137109 *May 26, 1961Jun 16, 1964Illinois Tool WorksMethod of making a carrier for containers
US3156377 *Jul 30, 1962Nov 10, 1964Waldorf Paper Prod CoBottle carriers
US3167214 *Nov 19, 1962Jan 26, 1965Container CorpBottle carrier with contour end gusset
US3186545 *Nov 8, 1962Jun 1, 1965St Regis Paper CoFully enclosed bottle package
US3217874 *May 27, 1963Nov 16, 1965Union Carbide CorpPackaging for a plurality of containers
US3219233 *Jun 11, 1963Nov 23, 1965Poly Pak Corp Of AmericaCarrier for bottles and the like
US3326369 *Mar 29, 1965Jun 20, 1967Waldorf Paper Prod CoOuter carton structure to facilitate price marking
US4294058 *Apr 3, 1979Oct 13, 1981Pepsico, Inc.Container package and its manufacture
US4422281 *Oct 3, 1980Dec 27, 1983Pepsi Co., Inc.Container package and its manufacture
US4930633 *Sep 22, 1987Jun 5, 1990Gloeyer WolfgangMultiple pack for a plurality of cylindrical containers
US6513657 *Apr 26, 2001Feb 4, 20033M Innovative Properties Co.Product packaging with handle-forming tearable tape system
US6758337Feb 25, 2002Jul 6, 2004Meadwestvaco Packaging Systems, LlcBeverage carton with strap type carrying handle
US7278538Apr 30, 2004Oct 9, 2007Meadwestvaco Packaging Systems, LlcBeverage carton with strap type carrying handle
US20040262374 *Apr 30, 2004Dec 30, 2004Vincent ChargueraudBeverage carton with strap type carrying handle
Classifications
U.S. Classification206/142, 229/925, 229/117.23, 206/428, 229/237
International ClassificationB65D71/00, B65D71/34, B65D71/28, B65D71/20
Cooperative ClassificationB65D71/34, B65D2571/00277, B65D71/285, B65D71/20, B65D2571/00493, B65D2571/0066, B65D2571/00339, Y10S229/925, B65D2571/00716, B65D2571/00567, B65D2571/00185, B65D2571/00265
European ClassificationB65D71/28B, B65D71/34, B65D71/20