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Publication numberUS2983421 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 9, 1961
Filing dateJul 13, 1960
Priority dateJul 13, 1960
Publication numberUS 2983421 A, US 2983421A, US-A-2983421, US2983421 A, US2983421A
InventorsTurpin Charles H
Original AssigneePillsbury Co
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Compartmented carton
US 2983421 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

May 9, 1961 c. H. TURPIN COMPARTMENTED CARTON Filed July 13, 1960 5 Sheets-Sheet 1 .x.m....=: m s m m MW M mi 4/ MM 3 Wm x 111111 llfiiill J w Q a m F F m B &

ATTORNEY6 May 9, 1961 c. H. TURPIN 2,983,421

COMPARTMENTED CARTON Filed July 13, 1960 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 IN V EN TOR. CHA RL 5.5/7. 7Z/RP/N gyf lujtiw ATTQRA E Ks May 9, 1961 c. H. TURPIN COMPARTMENTED CARTON 5 Sheets-Sheet 5 Filed July 13, 1960 ml: M 3 m r T M M/N INVENTOR. 67mm E5 H; TURPIN nited States Pat n COMPARTMENTED CARTON Filed July 13, 1960, Ser. No. 43,700

3 Claims. Cl. 229-17 This invention relates to a protective compartmented car-ton formed from a single precu-t and preglued blank adapted for the merchandising of foodstuffs and the like. Moreparticularly, this invention relates to a dual compartmented carton formed from protective laminated sheet material at high speed production rates and adapted to contain two separate quantities of the same or different materials.

In the merchandising of many flaked, granulated or other finely divided materials, particularly foodstufls which may be sensitive to air or moisture or odors and the like, there is an ever present problem of producing a tightly sealed package at high speed and low cost so as to be competitive in the market place. Many of the same materials may contain ingredients, such as moisture, fats, shortening or the like, from which it is necessary to protect the merchandising package by a protective barrier material. Many of the same materials contain, or produce in handling, finely divided powdery particles which tend to sift from minute cracks and openings in the package unless especially sealed within an inner container. At the same time, it is often desirable to package in a single container two dilferent materials or two separate portions of the same material. Where two portions of the same material are packaged together, it may be desirable that the package may be opened to dispense one portion while remaining to protect the other.

It is the principal object of this invention to provide a single compartmented carton by which all of these objectives may be attained.

Other objects of the invention will become apparent as the description proceeds.

To the accomplishment of the foregoing and related ends, this invention then comprises the features hereinafter fully described and particularly pointed out in the claims, the following description setting forth in detail certain illustrative embodiments of the invention, these being indicative, however, of but a few of the various ways in which the principles of the invention may be employed.

The invention is illustrated by the drawings in which the same numerals refer to correspno'ding parts and in which: v

Figure 1 is a plan view of the outer surface of a blank of sheet material from which one form of the container is assembled;

Figure 2 is a perspective view of the compartmented carton assembled, but with the top open;

Figure 3 is a horizontal section on the line 33 of Figure '2 and in the direction of the arrows;

65 Figure 4 is a perspective view of the completed closed 2 a protective barrier layer from which the carton of this invention is formed;

Figure 7 is a plan view of the outer surface of a blank of sheet material from which a modified form of container according to the present invention is formed;

Figure 8 is a perspective view of the top portion of the modified compartmented carton assembled, but with the top open;

Figure 9 is a horizontal section on the line 9-9 of Figure 8 and in the direction of the arrows; I

Figure 10 is a perspective view of the top portion of the modified form of compartmented carton shown completely closed; and I Y Figure 11 is an enlarged fragmentary vertical section through the top corner seal of the modified form of carton taken on the line 1111 of Figure 10and in the direction of the arrows.

Referring to the drawings and particularly to Figure 1, there is shown a generally rectangular precut blank 10 of sheet material from which one form of the compart;

panel 11 and back face panel 12 and a rectangular right hand end panel 15 between front face panel 11 and inner back panel 13. An interior'rectangular partition panel 16 is adjacent to and integral with innerback panel 13. An attaching flap or tab 17 is adjacent to and integral with interior partition panel 16.

The blank includes a front bottom flap 18, a back bottom flap 19, bottom end flaps 21 and 22 and a bottom partition panel flap 23, all adjacent to and integral with the front, back, end and partition panels, respectively. The blank is also provided with a front top flap 24, a back top flap 25, end top flaps 27 and 28 and a partition panel top flap 29, all adjacent to and integral with the front, back, end and partition panels, respectively.

One side of end top flap 27 is cut away to provide a trapezoidal flap or tab 30 commonly referred to as a Van Buren ear which is adjacent to and integral with front top flap 24. The end top flap 28 is similarly cut away to provide a second tab or ear 31 adjacent to and integral with the opposite end of front top flap 24.

The blank is scored to provide a fold line 32 between front face panel 11 and left hand end panel 14 and to provide a fold line 33 between face panel 11 and right hand end panel 15. The blank is likewise scored to provide'a fold line 34 between back face panel 12 and left hand end panel 14 and to provide a fold line 35 between inner back panel 13 and right hand end panel 15. The blank is scored on opposite sides of inner partition panel 16 to provide a fold line 36 between panel 16 and inner back panel 13 and a fold line 37 between panel 16 and attaching flap 17. Fold lines 3237 are all parallel and extend transversely across the blank 10.

The blank is scored longitudinally spaced from one edge to provide a fold line 38 between face panel 11 and front bottom flap 18, fold line 39 between back face panel 12 and back bottom flap 19, fold lines 41 and42 between end panels 14 and 15 and end bottom flaps 21 and 22 and fold line 43 between inner partition panel 16 and bottom flap 23. The blank is provided with transverse cuts between the edge and the longitudinal score line forming fold lines 39-41 between the bottom flaps 19 and 21 to permit the bottom flaps to be folded inwardly at right angles with respect to their adjacent panels.

The blank is also scored longitudinally spaced inwardly from the opposite edge to provide a fold line 44 between the front face 11 and front top flap 24, fold line 45 between back panel 12 and back top flap 25, fold lines 47 and 48 between end panels 14 and 15 and top end flaps 27 and 28 and fold line 43A between inner partition panel 16 and top partition fiap 29. The blank is provided with a transverse cut extending from the marginal edge to the fold line between back top flap 25 and adjacent end top flap 27 to permit the top flaps to be folded inwardly at right angles with respect to their adjacent panels. Tab or ear 30 is joined to front top flap 24 along a fold line 49 and ear 31 is joined to the opposite end of front top flap 24 along fold line 50.

One side of end bottom flap 21 is cut away to provide a trapezoidal flap or tab 51 adjacent to and integral with front bottom flap 18. The end bottom flap 22 is similarly cut away to provide a second tab or ear 52 adjacent to and integral with the opposite end of front bottom flap 18. Tab or ear 51 is joined to front bottom flap 18 along a fold line 53 and car 52 is joined to the opposite end of front bottom flap 18 along fold line 53.

In order to facilitate opening of one of the carton compartments without disturbing the seal of the other, there are provided perforatedlines 55 defining an area adjacent the top of left hand side panel 14 conforming generally in shape and very slightly larger in size than the Van Buren ear 30. Thus, as will be explained in greater detail hereinafter, the package may be opened by pressing in on the Van Buren ear to break the perforations 55 and then tearing back the composite top flap along the scored edges at the top of the carton. To insure the integrity of the inside barrier layer of the carton, perforations 55 extend only partially through the thickness of the blank, preferably between about and Vs of the thickness. In the same manner perforations 56 define an area adjacent the top edge of right hand end panel corresponding generally in shape and slightly larger in size than Van Buren car 31.

The front top flap 24 may optionally be provided with two scored fold lines 57 and 58 extending transversely across the flap from fold line 44 to facilitate opening of one compartment of the dual compartmented carton without disturbing the seal of the remaining compartment. Back top flap 25 is optionally scored to provide fold lines 59 and 60 for the same purpose. Score lines 57 and 59 are spaced inwardly from the ends of their respective flaps by about the same distance so that they overlie one another in the closed carton. Fold lines 58 and 60 are similarly disposed to lie together in the finished carton.

As shown in Figures 2 and 3, when the carton is as sembled by folding the blank inwardly along fold lines 3237, the left hand half of back face panel 12 overlaps inner back panel 13 and is secured thereto by glue or other adhesive 63. The surface of attaching flap 17 is similarly secured by adhesive at 63A to the inside surface of the front face panel 11. As a result, partition panel 16 is disposed between and parallel to end panels 14 and 15 to divide the carton into two separate compartments, which may be equal in size or not, as desired. The bottom of the carton is formed by folding bottom flaps 21, 22 and 23 inwardly, folding bottom flap 19 inwardly on top of them, then folding bottom flap 18 inwardly on top of the bottom flap 19, folding cars 51 and 52 against end panels 14 and 15, respectively, and securing the adjacent surfaces to one another with adhesive.

In forming the top closure of the compartmented carton, left and right hand end top flaps 27 and 28, each having a cut away portion, are folded inwardly. Partition panel top flap 29 may be folded either direction, but is preferably folded with its inner surface carrying a barrier layer facing inwardly. The back top flap 25 is folded inwardly and adhesively secured to end top flaps 27 and 28 and partition top flap 29. Front top flap 24 is folded inwardly and adhesively secured to top flap 25. At this stage the tabs 'or =ears 30 and '31 extend 'out- 4 wardly from the top end edges of the carton. These Van Buren ears are then folded downwardly against the opposite end panels of the carton and adhesively attached to complete the carton.

In order to better insure a tight seal at the top and bottom edges of the carton, a thickened layer or bead 64 of flexible deformable adhesive material is provided along the inner surface of fold line 49 where tab or car 30 is joined to the back top flap. Thus, when the top flap is secured in place and the ear 30 is folded over the top end corner edge of the carton, the thickened layer or bead 64 of adhesive is compressed and caused to be flattened out and spread over a Wider area, particularly in the areas where the top, end, and front or back faces come together, to produce a tight seal to insure against product loss by sifting and entry of air, moisture or odors. A similar bead'of adhesive 65 is provided adjacent tab or car 31 at the opposite top edge of the carton and ears 51 and 52 at the bottom of the carton are similarly provided with adhesive beads. The top Van Buren ears, when secured in place, lie within the areas outlined by perforations 55 and 56 on the opposite end panels of the carton. The carton, as completed, contains two separate sealed compartments, either of which may be opened to dispense its contents without disturbing the seal of the other.

The carton is opened, for example, by pressing with the thumb on the overlapping tab or car 31 with sufiicient pressure to break the box along the perforations 56 which extend a substantial distance through the thickness of the sheet material from which the carton is formed. Then the composite top of the carton is grasped between thumb and finger and lifted to tear along the opposite edges of the top of the carton. This separated portion of the composite top flap is then folded back to permit easy emptying of the contents of the compartment at that end of the box. The other compartment is opened in similar manner.

In some instances it may be desirable to consider panel 12 as being the front of the carton bearing the brand name, etc., and panel 11 as the back. When this is done it may be desirable to first fold in top flap 24 bearing the Van Buren ears and then fold top flap 25 on top of flap 24. This avoids the presence of an exposed edge of a top flap along the front of the carton. The Van Buren ears in this instance extend from the inner top flap. If desired the ears 30 and 31 may be made integral with top flap 25 whether flap 25 is to be the inner or outermost top flap in the assembled and closed carton.

To insure a tight seal of the compartments in the closed carton, the sheet material of which the carton is formed is provided with -a substantially impervious barrier layer. The composition of the barrier layer is dependent, to large extent, upon the characteristics of the material to be packaged within the compartmented carton. It may be in the form of a coating or a laminated film. Exemplary barrier materials include parafiin, polyethylene, metal foil, glassine, vinylidine chloride, rubber hydrochloride, polyvinyl chloride, and the like. A preferred form of barrier layer construction for packages adapted to contain foodstuffs, such as cake mixes, dehydrated potatoes and the like, is shown in Figure 6. The sheet material from which the carton blank 10 is formed includes a base 66 of paper board, cardboard, or similar sheet material from which foldable cartons are conventionally made. The paper board stock is desirably coated on one side. A typical base paper board material is White Patent Coated Newsback Board having a thickness of about 0.01 to 0.02 inch and a basis Weight of about 6575 pounds per 1000 square feet.

The uncoated surface of base 66 is provided with a thin layer 67 of microcrystalline wax laminating adhesive applied at the rate of about 4 to 5 pounds per 1000 square 'feet. Adhered to this adhesive layer is a laminated glassine film composed of a layer 68 of glassine adhered by a layer 69 of microcrystalline wax to a second film 70 of glassine. Typical basis weight of the laminated glassine is about 14 to 17 pounds per 1000 square feet, the lamined gl-assine being composed of two film .layers of amber glassine at about 6 to 7 pounds per 1000 square feet adhered together in a sandwich by a thin layer of microcrystalline wax applied at the rate of about 2 to 3 poundsper 1000 square feet.

One-exemplary laminated paper stock for blanks was made up with a base of White Patent Coated Newsback Board having a basis weight of 69 pounds per 1000 square feet. To this was adhered a laminated glassine film having a basis weight of 15.7 pounds per 1000 square feet made up of two film layers of amber glassine, each at 6.7 pounds per 1000 square feet adhered together with 2.3 pounds of 155 F. melting point microcrystalline wax. The glassine-wax sandwich was adhered to the board base with 4.6 pounds of the same microcrystalline wax adhesive material.

This exemplary board material can be folded on score lines at least 180 without breaking the glassine lining and without causing any objectionable breaking on the patent coated surface. The board has a maximum moisture vapor transmission rate of about 0.3 gram water per 24 hours per 100 square inches at 100 F. and 90% relative humidity over calcium chloride. It does not carry or impart any objectionable odor. It is resistant to scufiing and cartons made from it are out clean and smooth and substantially free from scrap, lint, dust and dirt. The rnicrocrystalline wax laminating adhesive prefably has a melting point in the range of about 150 F.-l60 F. An exemplary adhesive material for application under the Van Buren ears is a tough ductile grade of microcrystalline wax applied hot under the ear. Alternatively, depending upon the material to be packaged, other flexible adhesives, such as rubber cement, mastic, and the like, may be used.

Depending upon the particular material to be packaged, the box may be assembled using conventional commercially available adhesives, such as glues, starches, dextrins, rubber cements, pressure and heat sensitive resinous adhesives, and the like, not incompatible with the material to be packaged. The blank is precut and is, preferably, preglued. The adhesive securing portions of the blank together to form the cartons must obviously be applied as a continuous coating or film to avoid the possibility of passage of air or moisture or the like through voids or discontinuities in the adhesive.

The carton, according to this invention, is designed for use on high speed packaging equipment. Typical of such high speed packaging machines are the Neverstop manufactuered by the Stokes & Smith Company, or the Velooitron manufactured by the Pneumatic Scale Corporation. The packages are preferably formed, filled and sealed at rates in excess of about 200 cartons per minute.

Referring now to Figures 7 to 11 of the drawings, there is shown a modified form of the compartmented carton of this invention. This modified carton is formed from -a blank A which includes a rectangular front face panel 11, a rectangular left hand back panel 12A and a rectangular right hand back panel 13, a rectangular left hand end panel 14 between front face panel 11 and back panel 12A and a rectangular right hand end panel 15 between front face panel 11 and back panel 13. An interior rectangular partition panel 16 is adjacent to and integral with back panel 13. An attaching flap or tab 17 is adjacent to and integral with interior partition panel 16.

The modified blank includes a front bottom flap 18, back bottom flaps 19A and 20, bottom end flaps 21A and 22A and a bottom partition panel flap 23A, all adjacent to and integral with the front, back, end and partition panels, respectively. This blank is also provided with a hand back top flap 25A. The end top fiap 28A is simi-.

front top flap 24, a left hand back top flap 25A, a right hand back top flap 26, end top flaps 27A and 28A and a partition panel top flap 29A, all adjacent to and integral with the front, back, end and partition panels, respectively.

In this modified carton one side of end top flap 27A is cut away to provide a trapezoidal flap or tab 30A (Van Buren ear) which is adjacent to and integral with left larly cut away to provide a second tab or ear 31A adjacent to and integral with right hand back top flap 26.

The modified blank is scored to provide a fold line 32 between front face panel 11 and left hand end panel 14 and to provide a fold line 33 between face panel 11 and right hand end panel -15. The blank is likewise scored to provide a fold line 34 between left hand back panel 12A and left 'hand end panel 14 and to provide a fold line 35 between right hand back panel 13 and right hand end panel 15. The blank is scored on opposite sides of inner partition panel 16 to provide a fold line 36-between panel 16 and right hand back panel 13 and a fold line 37 between panel 16 and attaching flap 17. In both forms of blank fold lines 3237 are all parallel and extend transversely across the blanks.

The modified blank is scored longitudinally spaced from one edge to provide a fold line 38 between face panel 11 and front bottom flap 18, fold line 39A between left hand back panel 12A and back bottom flap 19A, fold line 40 between right hand back panel 13 and bottom flap 20, fold lines 41 and 42 between end panels 14 and 15 and end bottom flaps 21A and 22A and fold line 43 between inner partition panel 16 and bottom flap 23A. The blank is provided with transverse cuts between the edge and the longitudinal score line forming fold lines 38-43 between the bottom flaps 19A, 21A, 18, 22A, 20 and 23A, to permit the bottom flaps to be folded inwardly at right angles with respect totheir adjacent panels.

' The modified blank is also scored longitudinally spaced inwardly from the opposite edge to provide a fold line 44 between the front face 11 and front top flap 24, fold line 45A between left hand back panel 12A and left hand back top flap 25A, fold line 46 between right hand back panel 13 and right hand back top fiap 26, fold lines 47 and 48 between end panels 14 and 15 and top end flaps 27A and 528A and fold line 48A between inner partition panel 16 and top partition flap 29A. The blank is projoined to the right hand back flap 26 along fold line 50A.

As in the first form of carton, in order to facilitate opening of one of the carton compartments without disturbing the seal of the other, there are provided perforated lines defining an area adjacent the top of left hand side panel 1 4 conforming generally in shape and very slightly larger in size than the Van Buren ear 30A Thus, as already explained, the package may be opened by pressing in on the Van Buren ear to break the perforations 55 and then tearing back the composite top flap along the scored edges at the top of the carton. In the same manner perforations 56 define an area adjacent the top edge of right hand end panel 15 corresponding generally in shape and slightly larger in size than Van Buren ear 31A.

The front top flap 24 may optionally be provided with two scored fold lines 57 and 58 extending transversely across the flap from fold line 44 to facilitate opening of one compartment of the dual compartmented carton without disturbing the seal of the remaining compartment. Left hand back top flap 25A is optionally scored to provide fold line 59A and right hand back top flap 26 is optionally scored to provide fold line odA for the same purpose. Score lines 57 and 59A are spaced inwardly from the ends of their respective flaps by about the same distance so that they overlie one another in the closed carton. Fold lines 58 and 60A are similarly disposed to lie together in the finished carto'n.

As shown in Figures 8 and 9, when the modified carton is assemblied by folding the blank inwardly along fold lines 32-36 and outwardly along fold line 37, the edge margin 61 of left hand back panel 12A overlaps the edge margin 6-2 of right hand back panel 13 and is secured theretoby glue or other adhesive 633. The surface of attaching flap 17 is similarly secured by adhesive at 63C to the inside surface of the front face panel 11. As a result, partition panel 16 is disposed between and parallel to end panels 14 and 15 to divide the carton into two separate compartments, which may be equal in size or not, as desired. The bottom of the carton is formed by folding bottom flaps 21A, 22A and 23A inwardly, folding composite bottom flap 119A-20 inwardly on top of them, then folding outer bottom flap 18 inwardly on top of the composite inner bottom flap, and securing the adjacent surfaces to one another with adhesive. If desired, for greater protection of the contents, the modified carton may also be provided with Van Buren ears at the bottom end edges as already described.

In forming the top closure of the modified compartmented carton, left and right hand and top flaps 27A and 28A, each having a cut away portion, are folded inwardly. Partition panel top flap 29A may be folded either direction, but is preferably folded with its inner surface carrying a barrier layer facing inwardly. The composite inner top flap 25A26 is folded inwardly and adhesively secured to end top flaps 27A and 28A and partition top flap 29A. At this stage the tabs or ears 30A and 31A extend outwardly from the top end edges of the carton. These Van Buren ears are then folded downwardly against the opposite end panels of the carton and adhesively attached. Outer top flap 24 is folded inwardly and adhesively secured to composite inner top flap 25A26, to complete the canton.

As already explained, in order to better insure a tight seal at the top edges of the carton, a thickened layer or bead 64 of flexible deformable adhesive material is provided along the inner surface of fold line 49A where tab or ear 30A is joined to the left hand back top flap. Thus, when the top flap is secured in place and the ear 30A is folded over the top end corner edge of the carton, the thickened layer or bead 64 of adhesive is compressed and caused to be flattened out and spread over a wider area, particularly in the areas where the top, end, and front or back faces come together, to produce a tight seal to insure against product loss by sifting and entry of air, mois ture or odors. A similar head of adhesive 65 is provided adjacent tab or car 31A at the opposite top edge of the carton. The Van Buren ears, when secured in place, lie within the areas outlined by perforations 55 and 56- on the opposite end panels of the carton. The modified carton, as completed, contains two separate sealed compartments, either of which may be opened in the same manner as the first carton to dispense its contents without disturbing the seal of the other.

The packages formed from the exemplary materials are especially designed for the merchandising of foodstuffs, such as dehydrated potatoes, to contain two equal, but separate premeasured servings, which will protect the second serving for a considerable period of time after a package is opened and the first serving is used. They are designed to protect dehydrated potatoes and like foodstuffs from atmospheric moisture and odors under normal handling, storage and display conditions for at least one year without deterioration by sorption of atmospheric gases, moisture, odors or the like. The use of separate interior linings, bags, pouches, etc. to preserve the contents has been eliminated. The size and relative proportions of the length, width and depth of the packages may be changed at will. 1

This application is a continuation-impart of my copending application Serial No. 843,836, filed October 1, 1959, for Compartmented Carton, now abandoned.

It is apparent that many modifications and variations of this invention as hereinbefore set forth may be made without departing from the spirit and scope thereof. The specific embodiments described are given by way of eX- ample only and the invention is limited only by the terms of the appended claims.

I'claim:

1. A sift-proof compartmented container resistant to passage of moisture and gases, which container comprises opposite front and back walls and intermediate end walls joining said opposite walls, each of said walls being generally rectangular; a partition the same size and shape as, and parallel to said end walls secured in place between said opposite front and back walls at approximately right angles thereto and spaced between said end walls to divide said container into two compartments; inner flaps extending from the ends of said end walls; flaps extending from the ends of said partition disposable over one of said compartments; first and second outer flaps extending from the ends of said opposite front and back walls respectively, the first outer flap adapted to be superimposed immediately over and entirely cover the inner end flaps and partition flap, the second outer flap adapted to be superimposed over said first outer flap; longitudinally extending tabs at the opposite ends of one of said outer flaps, said tabs being adapted to be folded down against the outer surfaces of said end walls, the inside surface of the fold line along which said longitudinally extending tabs are attached to one of said outer flaps being provided with a thickened bead of flexible microcrystalline wax adhesive whereby, when the container is closed with the tabs folded down against the outer surfaces of said end walls, the adhesive is compressed and spread to form a sift-proof closure; said walls, partition, flaps and tabs being integral, being formed from a single blank of paper board sheet material, said sheet material being provided with a barrier layer resistant to the passage of moisture and gases, said barrier layer being composed of two glassine films bonded together with a layer of microcrystalline wax and bonded to said blank sheet material with microcrystalline wax, said barrier layer being bonded to the paper board sheet material from which the container is formed so as to be disposed on the inner surfaces of said container; perforations in said intermediate end walls adjacent the area of said overlying longitudinally extending tabs, the area defined by said perforations conforming generally in shape to said tabs and in size just slightly larger than said tabs, said perforations extending through less than the total thickness of the sheet material from which said container is formed so as not to penetrate said barrier layer.

2. A container according to claim 1 further characterized in that said longitudinally extending tabs are integral with the second and outermost of said outer flaps.

3. A container according to claim 1 further characterized in that said partition is spaced approximately equidistant between the container end walls to divide the container into two equal comparments.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,737,950 Scotland Dec. 3, 1929 1,815,565 Hill July 21, 1931 2,039,437 Moore May 5, 1936 2,330,466 Bergstein Sept. 28, 1943 2,336,706 Sunderhauf Dec. 14, 1943 2,415,387 Graebner Feb. 4, 1947 2,436,553 Couch Feb. 24, 1948 2,819.831 Polarek Ian. 14, 1958

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3047204 *Mar 13, 1961Jul 31, 1962Container CorpFolding carton with internal reinforcing structure
US3121521 *Nov 24, 1961Feb 18, 1964Marius BerghgrachtBox adapted to contain a liquid or flowing material
US3135457 *Jan 18, 1963Jun 2, 1964Risucci Edward JPlural carton containing separable units
US3166231 *Jun 6, 1962Jan 19, 1965Packaging Corp AmericaSeal end carton
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US3198416 *Sep 10, 1962Aug 3, 1965Packaging Corp AmericaMethod of preventing wicking and moisture and vapor absorption and penetration in paperboard cartons, and cartons produced by such method
US3223231 *May 13, 1963Dec 14, 1965Pfizer & Co CRodenticide and feeding tray package
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US3452920 *Jul 11, 1968Jul 1, 1969Weyerhaeuser CoReinforced partitioned container
US3492133 *Apr 25, 1968Jan 27, 1970Weyerhaeuser CoMethod of packaging meat in a compartmented container
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US3734390 *May 3, 1971May 22, 1973Brown CoFront-opening carton with unique end flap arrangement
US3735914 *Jan 3, 1972May 29, 1973Container CorpSift-proof dispensing carton
US3954220 *Feb 24, 1975May 4, 1976John Paul FosterLitter free ecology box
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US4354630 *Oct 10, 1980Oct 19, 1982Champion International CorporationPyramid carton closure
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US5135158 *Feb 26, 1991Aug 4, 1992Waldorf CorporationThree-cell, reclosable product dispenser
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Classifications
U.S. Classification229/233, 229/5.85, 229/120.3, 229/121
International ClassificationB65D5/48, B65D5/70, B65D5/4805
Cooperative ClassificationB65D5/703, B65D5/48014
European ClassificationB65D5/70B1, B65D5/48A2