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Publication numberUS2983508 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 9, 1961
Filing dateJun 4, 1957
Priority dateJun 4, 1957
Publication numberUS 2983508 A, US 2983508A, US-A-2983508, US2983508 A, US2983508A
InventorsModine Thomas B
Original AssigneeModine Thomas B
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Spray producing scoop for water-borne objects
US 2983508 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

y 9, 1931 T. B. MODINE 2,983,508

SPRAY PRODUCING SCOOP FOR WATER-BORNE OBJECTS Filed June 4, 1957 /9 Q /N|/ENTOR:

THOMAS B. MODINE ,4 TTOR/VEV United States SPRAY PRODUCING SCOOP FOR WATER-BORNE OBJECTS This invention relates to a novelty item for use with boats or like water-borne objects to create a streamof water. 1 7

It is an object of this invention to provide a means whereby a stream of water can be created when said means is attached and properly disposed with regard to a water-home object moving through Water.

Another object of this invention is to provide a means of the novelty type which can be readily and easily attached to the rear of a motor boat, the motor, water skis, or the like object, and which is inexpensive but yet'adjustable, and all for the purpose of creating a stream or spray of water directed high above and behind the object when the latter moves through the waters Another object of this invention is to provide a novelty which accomplishes the foregoing objects with said means being readily movable out of an operating position and into an inoperative position. I

Other objects and. advantages will become apparent 'upon reading the following description in light of the accompanying drawings, wherein:

Fig. 1 is a perspective view of a motor boat with the device of this invention attached to the rear thereof and showing the water stream created by said device.

Fig. 2 is an enlarged top view of the device shown-in Fig. 1 and viewed along the plane indicated by the line 22 of Fig. 3, and showing a fragment of the boat motor.

. is the device, generally designated 12, which constitutes the embodiment of this invention," and it will be noted that the device is attached by means of a bracket 13 to the boat motor 11 on the boat transom 14. The bracket 13 is shown attached to the motor 11 by means of the four bolts 15 to secure the bracket in a fixed-position. It should be further understood that the view assumes that the boat is moving forward through the water, and the device 12, therefore, creates the water stream or spray depicted to begoing upwardly and rearwardly of the boat. Of course, this device is of a novelty type, and it will be appreciated that such a stream or spray of water creates an extremely interesting, aswell as pleasant, view in addition to creating'the effect of high speed of the boat since, heretofore, only the boats of the hydroplane type have created a rear stream or spray due to their extreme high speed. It should be further understood that a pair of the devices or items 12 could be attached, one to each side 2,983,508 I Patented May 9, 1961,

Also, the device could be attached to water skis, surf boards, and other water-borne objects.

Fig. 2 shows a fragment of the motor 11, and it further shows'a mounting plate 16 to be provided with an arcuate .slot 17 and two spaced apart and rearwardly projecting pieces 18. It will also be noted that the extreme rear ends of the pieces 18 are each provided with a semi-circular opening 19, and Fig. 3 shows the opening 19 to extend the length of the pieces 18 such that the screw 21 can pass through the opening 19 and through the plate 16 to attach into the bracket 13. 'As will be more apparent hereinafter, the screw 21 is utilized as a retaining screw for mountingthet item onto the boat transom, and

it is also utilized as a pivot screw for the item. Similarly,

a thumb screw 22 passes through the arcuate slot 17 to thread into the bracket 13 such that the two screws 21 and 22 secure the plate 16 to the bracket 13, and it will now be apparent that loosening of the screw 22 will per- .mit the plate 16 to be pivoted about the lower screw 21 by virtue of the slot 17, and thus the plate 16 and the entire item 12 can be disposed in any selected tipped or pivoted position with respect to the longitudinal direction of the boat 10.

As mentioned, the pieces 18 are spaced apart, and the therefore, receive a flat piece or connecting arm 23 which extends to a position adjacent the bracket plate 16, at which pointa pivot bolt 24 passes through the pieces 18 and; of course, through the plate 23 to secure the latter to the mounting bracket and provide the pivot axis for the plate 23.v Another thumb screw 26 threads into one of the pieces 18 to abut the near side of the plate 23, as shown in Fig. 2, and to thereby retain the plate 23 in a fixed pivoted position by virtue of the abutting or clamping force of thenut onto the side of the plate 23. A member or scoop 27 is attached to the rear end of the plate 23 to move therewith, and it will be noticed that the scoop 27 includes a rear portion 28 and side portions 29 and afront portion or cross bar 31. The side portions 29 are shown to converge toward the upper end thereof and, of course,.there is no bottom portion, or it may be stated that the bottom of the scoop is open.

In the full line position shown in Fig. 3 the rear portion 28 presents an upwardly and rearwardly inclined surface, the lower end of which extends down intothe water andfbelow the surface line indicated Sfand shown by a dotdash line in Fig. 3. When it is desired to raise the scoop 27 out of the water, the thumb screw 26 can be loosened and the scoop with the plate 23 can be pivoted to the raised position with front edge of the plate 23 engaginga lower hole in the pieces 18, such as shown in Fig, 3, so that the net result is that the scoop 27 will be placed in the dot-dash line position shown in Fig. 3. In, the latter mentioned position, of course, the scoop 27 willnot create the stream or spray of water, such as indicated in Fig. 1, and the device is, therefore, in an inoperative position. Since the lower ends of the sides 29 are farther apartthan the upper ends of the sides, the

the scoop and will be formed into a stream of a shape indicated by the bottom 28 and the sides 29.

By virtue of the thumb screw 26, the scoop 27 can be placed in selective pivoted positions such that the bottom 28 will be inclined at an angle which will present a desired spray of the water and, of course, by virtue of the thumb screw 22, the spray can be directed to one side or the other with respect to the longitudinal direction of the boat. Therefore, the two adjustments provide adjustment in the longitudinal, as well as the transverse, direction of the boat, and they are hand manipulable adjustments which do not require special tools, so the user can readily make the angular changes while on the water.

Also, the optimum angle of forty-five degrees for the scoop bottom 28 with the water surface "S" can be gaged by the top edge of the plate 23 being aligned with the pieces 18, as shown in solid lines in Fig. 3. V

To, further affect the water entering the. scoop 27,

means such as the shown compression coil spring 32 are provided between the scoop sides 29 to be disposed in the stream of water coming up through the scoop, 27. The means or spring 32 thus intercepts the stream of water and disintegrates it to where a fine spray is created as the stream flows around and through the spring coils. In the shown arrangement, each of the scoop sides 29 has a trunnion or a boss 33 attached to the inside surface thereof to project inwardly and present a mounting. boss which is received by the inside diameter of the spring 32, and thereby the bosses retain the spring 32 in its shown position. The spring would actually vibrate or flexunder the pressure of the water stream, and this would further disintegrate the stream into a desired spray at the outlet side of the scoop 27. Obviously, othermeans could be used in place of the spring 32' such that the means disintegrates the stream of water in the scoop.

While a specific embodiment of this invention has been shown and described, it should be obvious that certain 1. A device for attaching to a boat or'likewater-borne object which moves through water in a givenidirection, with said device creating a stream of water directed upwardly and rearwardly of said object when said object moves in said direction, comprising a bracket adapted .to be attached to said object and including means to make it pivotal thereon about the axis longitudinalof said direction, a scoop pivotally mounted on said bracket for adjustable movement about the axis transverse to said direction of said object and said scoop including an open bottom and an open top and aplanular surface extending therebetween, said scoop and said bracket being disposed on said object for said surface to partly extend into the water in a rearwardly inclined position when said scoop is in the lowest pivotal position and said surface and said bracket being disposed on said object for said surface to be clear of thewater when said scoop is in the highest pivotal position, means connected between said scoop and said bracket for adjustably securing said scoop to said bracket in selected pivotal positions about said'transverse axis, and means connected between said object and said bracket for adjustably securing the latter with said scoop to said object in selected pivotal positions about said longitudinal axis. I

2. A device for attaching to a. boat or other waterborne object for creating a stream of water directed upwardly and rearwardly of said object Whenthe'latter is in forward motion, comprising a bracket adapted to be attached through pivotal means to said object'and including two spaced-apart pieces disposed thereonand'extending rearwardly thereof with respect to the direction of said forward motion, said pivotal means extending between said bracket and said object and having a pivotal axis disposed in the direction of said forward motion, a scoop including a plate disposed between said pieces and being pivotally attached to said bracket andincluding a planular inclined surface disposed upwardly andrearwardly with respect to said forward motion of said object with the lower end of said inclined surface in the water in one position of said scoop and when said object is in forward motion and the upper end of said inclined surface out of the water, said scoop being pivotal on said bracket to another position to dispose said lower end out of the water, a lock means interengaged between said bracket and said plate for selectively locking said scoop in selected pivotal positions on said bracket, and said scoop having an open upper end and including sides disposed on said inclined surface and'extending in the direction forward of said inclined surface for scooping a stream of water between said sides and on said inclined surface and through said upper end when said object is in forward motion and said scoop is in said one, position.

3. A device for attaching to a boat or other Waterborne object for creating a stream of water directed upwardly and rearwardly of said object when the latter is in forward motion, comprising a bracket having an armate slot and a set screw therein for pivotally attaching said bracket to said object, a scoop pivotally attached to said bracket and including a planular surface disposed upwardly and rearwardly with respect to said'forward motion of said object with the lower end of said surface in the water when said object is in forward motion and with the upper end of said surface out of the Water, said scoop including sides di'sposed on saidsurface and extending therefrom in the direction of said forward motion and converging toward each other at the upper ends thereof'for flaring said stream in the plane of the foreand-aft direction of said forward motion, and a cross bar connected between said sides and being spaced from said surface and extending in the direction of said forward motion and forming the attachment between said scoop and said bracket.

V 4. A device for attaching to a boat or other waterborne object for engaging the water wake thereof and creating a stream of water directed upwardly and rearwardly of said object when the latter is in forward motion, comprising a scoop adapted to be attached to said object and including a surface disposed upwardly and rearwardly with respect to said'forward motion of said object with the lower end of said surface in the water when said object is in forward motion and with the upper end out of the water, said scoop including sides disposed on said surface and extending transverse'to the plane of said surface and forward thereof with respect to said forward motion, and means having water passages therethrough and disposed between said sides at the upper ends thereof above the plane of said wake for engaging the stream of water moving up said scoop to change said stream into a plurality of smaller streams when said object is in forward motion.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS OTHER REFERENCES Washington (D.C.) Sunday Star, page 8, Jan. 5, 1941 (feature section).

me n i

Patent Citations
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US655140 *Aug 24, 1899Jul 31, 1900Friedrich WendlerDrag-brake for marine vessels.
US1587835 *Apr 15, 1925Jun 8, 1926Himmelright Raleigh JLocomotive water scoop
US1748066 *Feb 9, 1928Feb 25, 1930Gray Hubert MWater-retarding means for locomotive tenders
US2281459 *Apr 24, 1940Apr 28, 1942Hubert Scott-PaineWater scoop for boats
US2370347 *Apr 27, 1944Feb 27, 1945Goebel Joseph PWater scoop for locomotive tenders
US2503393 *Jun 5, 1946Apr 11, 1950 Adjustable gravity ball projector
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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3052899 *Jul 21, 1961Sep 11, 1962Twin City Automatic IncSpray attachment for water skis and the like
US3091453 *Aug 19, 1960May 28, 1963Bennett Sherman AAquatic amusement device
US4001077 *Feb 27, 1976Jan 4, 1977Orville KemperFloats, rotation, scoops
US4290379 *Jul 30, 1979Sep 22, 1981Carter Festus ASuppression of surface foam on detergent-contaminated lagoons
US4587064 *Nov 7, 1984May 6, 1986Albert BlumMarine bays
US4699596 *Feb 13, 1987Oct 13, 1987Klinker Ronald DModified jet ski nozzle
US4925181 *Apr 10, 1989May 15, 1990Anderson Russell WSwimming pool water cannon
US5664910 *Jun 7, 1995Sep 9, 1997Light Wave, Ltd.Boat activated wave generator
US5860766 *Dec 18, 1996Jan 19, 1999Light Wave, Ltd.Boat activated wave generator
US5911190 *Jul 11, 1997Jun 15, 1999Light Wave, Ltd.Boat activated wave generator
US6105527 *Jun 16, 1998Aug 22, 2000Light Wave Ltd.Boat activated wake enhancement method and system
US6409555Aug 8, 2000Jun 25, 2002Rave Sports, Inc.Device for generating a plume of water
US6860209 *Oct 6, 2003Mar 1, 2005Mckoy Errol W.Watercraft amusement ride
US7625153 *Feb 14, 2006Dec 1, 2009Sauerbier Charles EFloating oceanic surfing reef
US8667917 *Sep 10, 2010Mar 11, 2014International Maritime Security CorporationWatercraft, water diverter, entanglement system, and defense system for watercraft
Classifications
U.S. Classification472/128, 417/232, 441/71, 261/120
International ClassificationB63H11/00, B63H11/113, B63B17/00
Cooperative ClassificationB63H11/113, B63B17/00
European ClassificationB63H11/113, B63B17/00