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Publication numberUS2983510 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 9, 1961
Filing dateOct 30, 1956
Priority dateOct 30, 1956
Publication numberUS 2983510 A, US 2983510A, US-A-2983510, US2983510 A, US2983510A
InventorsJr Roy E Blewitt
Original AssigneeAmerican Mach & Foundry
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Bowling pin spotting machines
US 2983510 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

May 9, 1961 R. E. BLEWlTT, JR 2,983,510

BOWLING PIN SPOTTING MACHINES Filed Oct. 50, 1956 3 Sheets-Sheet 1 I INVENTOR ROY E. BLEWlTT JR. (9 B LLQ W/W ATT RNEY R. E. BLEWITT, JR

BOWLING PIN SPOTTING MACHINES May 9, 1951 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed 00 30, 1956 1N VENTOR ROY E. BLEWITT JR. Bi/

3 Sheets-Sheet 3 nwma mE w R. E. BLEWITT, JR

BOWLING PIN SPOTTING MACHINES INVENTOR ROY E. BLEWITT JR.

ATT

MzfK May 9, 19 31 Filed 001:. 30, 1956 25 2:. n u z: m o

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0 6E vdE k w State mm Q BOWLING PIN SPOTTING MACHINES Roy E. Blewitt, Jr., Mansfield, Ohio, assignor to American Machine & Foundry Company, a corporation of New Jersey This invention relates to bowling pin spotting machines and more particularly to bowling pin spotting machines for automatically spotting and respotting bowlmg pins on the playing bed of a bowling alley, and to an improved and simplified control system for such a machine.

Heretofore, control systems for bowling pin spotting machines have utilized complex electrical circuitry which in some machines included interconnections between a plurality of rotatable, cam operated switches driven by several of the main movable elements of a pin spotting machine or, in the case of other machines, switches dis posed in selected positions along the path of travel of the moving elements, and a multi-level stepping switch. These cam operated switches provided information as to the location of the movable elements such as the pin spotting table and sweep, and this information was programmed through the stepping relay which was selectively advanced to energize other selected circuits which, in turn, initiated functions relevant to the operation of the machine when the movable elements were in a particular position, Such control systems required many switches, cams and interlocking relays with complex associated circuits to indicate to the programming stepper switch where each movable element was disposed at a particular instant in the course of a game being played.

It is therefore an object of the invention to provide an improved and simplified control circuit for a bowling pin spotting machine which reduces to a minimum the number of positioning determining devices for the movable elements of the machine.

In accordance with the invention a switch actuating, timing device is provided which defines intervals representative of the relative time differentials required for the major moving elements to perform their various functions during the course of operation of the machine while the game is being played. By furtherproviding a single cam operated switch on each of a minimum number of the major movable elements, the oif-on character of the information provided by such switches is correlated with the selective actuation of switches associated with the timing device and jointly cooperates with a multi-position switching relay to cause it to properly program the non-repetitive sequences of the basic operating cycles required for playing a bowling game.

It is therefore another object of the invention to provide an improved and simplified control circuit for a bowling pin spotting machine which has means for effecting the non-repetitive sequences of the basic operating cycles required for playing a bowling game in response to the relative time disposition and differentials associated therewith of the functions performed by the elements of the machine. t

It is yet another object of the invention to provide a bowling pin spotting machine having an improved and simplified control mechanism which enables the machine to operate under all conditions of play with a minimum amount of programming information.

which form a part of this specification and in which likecharacters of reference indicate the same or like parts:

Fig. 1 is a side elevation of a bowling pin spotting machine constructed in accordance with the invention;

Fig. 2 is a plan view illustrating the spotting and respotting mechanisms of the machine;

Fig. 3 is a schematic circuit diagram illustrating the preferred form of the novel electrical control system in accordance with the invention;

Fig. 4 is a schematic view of the timer motor and associated cam operated switch;

Fig. 5 is aschematic view of the cam which is operative in response to the rotation of the sweep operating shaft;

Fig, 6 is a schematic'view of the cam and associated switch which is operated in response to the rotation of the table operating shaft;

In the embodiment of the invention illustrated herein, the improved control mechanism is associated with and forms an operative part of a bowling pin spotting machine provided with mechanisms for removing or elevating pinsfrom the pit of a bowling alley, and delivering them in succession to a distributor associated therewith from which pins are delivered in succession and conveyed one by one to a pin spotting device having means for supporting and spotting pins and also for respotting pins during the course of play, when such is desired.

Referring now to the drawings, and particularly to Figs. 1 and 2, the machine illustrated therein, with the exception of the novel control mechanism of the present invention, isv similar in construction and operation to that disclosed in copending application Serial Number 412,187, filed February 24, 1954, by Roger E. Dumas, now U.S. Patent Number 2,890,886. The mechanism illustrated for removing pins from the pit to the bowling alley is also similar in construction and operation to that disclosed in copending application Serial Number 150,232, filed March 17, 1950, by Robert O. Holloway and John Zuercher for Bowling Pin Elevating Mechanism, now U.S. Patent Number 2,767,983. Pins delivered by the device which removes or elevates them from the pit of the alley are discharged therefrom into a distributing device operatively associated therewith, and which may be similar in construction and operation to that disclosed and described in copending application Serial Number 178,777, filed August 11, 1950 by John Zuercher for Pin Handling Mechanism for Bowling Pin Spotting Ma chines, now U.S. Patent Number 2,767,984. Operatively associated with the distributing mechanism is a bowling pin spotting and respotting device, which may be similar in construction and operation to that illustrated and described in copending application Serial Number 180,174, filed August 18, 1950 by Robert L. Holloway et al. for Bowling Pin Spotting and Respotting Mechanism, now U.S. Patent Number 2,781,395. These mechanisms which form coacting and selectively actuated parts of the bowling pin spotting machine with which the control mechanism of the invention'is operatively connected, are controlled thereby in such manner that all sequential and cyclical operations of the machine take place in proper timed order, in spotting and respotting pins upon the playing bed of alley B during the entire course of play of a'game after each normal two-ball 1 3 therefore it is not to be considered as limited in use with the structures shown in the above referred to patents.

As shown in Fig. 1, bowling pins A when struck by a ball, fall from or are removed from alley B andgutters C by means of a sweep and guard designated generally as S. The mechanism for actuating sweep'and guard S is operated after each ball is rolled by a bowler. After the last ball of a frame is rolled, all pins either standing or fallen, are swept intopit P.

In the illustrated embodiment, pins falling from alley B or delivered into pit P drop onto a conveyor designated generally as E, similar in construction and operation to that disclosed in copending Holloway et a1. application Serial Number 150,232, now U.S. Patent Number 2,767,983, and Dumas copending application SerialNumher 226,359, now U.S. Patent Number 2,821,395. This conveyor is pit wide, and continually in motion, whereby pins are moved out of pit P and delivered to pin elevating mechanism F. Bowling balls dropping upon conveyor E roll and are carried downwardly by conveyor E to one corner of pit P for delivery therefrom by suitable ball lifting mechanism (not shown) onto a return runway of conventional design (not shown) for return to a bowler. Since the ball return mechanism forms no part of this invention, further description and showing thereof are omitted in the interest of brevity.

Pins A are delivered from conveyor E into pockets formed in the rim of a rotary disc G of pin elevating mechanism F. Disc G is' mounted for rotation on a horizontal shaft and is driven'by a suitable arrangement of pulleys and belts by means of a motor The pins A are carried upwardly by disc G to a position which is substantially directly above pit P where each pin A is discharged into a pin distributor generally indicated as H. In the illustrated embodiment, disc G is divided with seven pin holding and conveying pockets and is constructed and operated in the same general manner as the mechanism shown and described in copending Holloway et al. application Serial Number 150,232. Therefore further showing and description are deemed unnecessary herein because this mechanism does not form a specific part of the invention.

Distributor H which includes an elongated telescopic, generally U-shaped chute J, is mounted for lateral movement back and forth across the machine, and also for vertical movement. This arrangement makes it possible to deliver pins A in succession from pin elevating mechanism F and selectively into spotters K on table T not only when table T is stationary, but also as it is moving to and from alley B. Pin spotters K are mounted in substantially triangular arrangement on table T, a pattern conforming with the conventional arrangement of pins on a bowling alley.

As each pin travels through channel I, it passes beneath a trip arm 12 which actuates a counting device 14. After ten pins have actuated trip arm 12, a switch 16 in counter 14 is closed which de-energizes solenoid 18. Solenoid 18 is connected to the pin releasing or delivering mechanism of pin elevator F, and when solenoid 18 t is de-energized, pins are not delivered from elevator F into distributor mechanism H. on the other hanl, until ten pins have actuated trip arm 12, switch 16 remains open, thus allowing pins to drop or roll into aligning device I from elevator disc G. The construction and operation of the pin releasing mechanism of elevator F are substantially the same as that shown and described in copending Zuercher application Serial Number 178,-

777, now U.S. Patent Number 2,767,984, and Dumascopending application Serial Number 226,359, now U.S. Patent Number 2,821,395, above referred to, and a detailed description is not deemed necessary herein.

During the course of operation of distributor D, the latter moves both laterally, vertically, and longitudinally, until at, #10 position (see Fig 2), an arm 20 mounted on the distributor H engages and operates a switch 22 supported by a bracket suitably located and attached to table T. The operation of switch 22 is described more in detail hereinafter in the description of the circuit diagram in Fig. 3. The front end of distributor H is adapted to move about table T in an intermittent fashion, being guided in its movement by heartshaped track L and stopping adjacent each spotter K to deliver a pin thereto. Distributor chute J moves in a telescopic fashion as it travels a course about track L.

When each of the spotters K contains a pin, further movement of distributor H is arrested until it is again necessary to feed pins to the spotters. Distributor H, and more particularly chute '1 with associated conveyor belt, is driven continuously from motor- 10 by means of suitable mechanical linkage.

Table T, which is supported in a suitable frame, is

moved in a controlled and selective manner to and from alley B whenever pins are to be spotted or respotted thereon. As shown, table T is generally triangular in form and supports ten triangularly arranged spotters K, and ten complementary respotter units U. It is so mounted and stabilized that it is maintained in a substantially horizontal, parallel relationship with alley B at all times. Table T is moved to and from alley B by means of motor 31 which is selectively operated in order to spot and respot pins on the alley as the play of the game proceeds from frame to frame.

After each ball is rolled, sweep S is operated in proper timed relation with the movements of table T to sweep deadwood or fallen pins from the alley, or to sweep deadwood and unwanted pins from the alley depending upon which ball of a frame is rolled. In the operation of the machine, sweep S, which also operates as a guard mechanism, is set in motion when a ball rolled by the player lands in pit P of the alley B and effects the closing of a pit switch 216, which is mounted adjacent a ball impact cushioning device M. The closing of pit switch 26, when cushioning device M is urged rearwardly by the impact of a ball thereon, efiects the starting of sweep motor 24 (Figs. 2 and 3), which in turn causes a shaft 28 to start rotating in the direction of the arrow shown in Fig. 2, and sweep S begins its downward movement into operative guarding and sweeping positions adjacent alley B.

Each cycle of operation of the machine requires one revolution of shaft 28. A single cam operated switch, indicated generally as SAl, is mounted upon shaft 28 and is adapted to be actuated at selected intervals during rotation of shaft 28. Cam switch SA forms a part of the electrical control circuit shown in Fig. 3 and described hereinafter.

Motor 31 is mounted on a cross member of the machine frame, Fig. 1, and is provided with a conventional gear reduction and associated driving mechanism connected to Table T which causes the table to be lowered and raised in respect to alley B for spotting and respotting pins thereon. Each spoter K is suitably attached to a bracket on table T which, in turn, is movably attached to an operating shaft which is adapted to be rotated by motor 31 during the spotting operation. The operating shaft for the spotters is provided with suitable mechanism so that when pins are to be spotted on alley B, all of the spotters K are swung from an inclined pin receiving and supporting position shown in Fig. 2 into substantially vertical pin delivering position and pins are deposited thereby on alley B whentable T is moved by motor 31 and associated driving means into a lower or pinspotting position relative to the alley. As the pin-spotting units K and respotting units U and the operating means therefor form no part of the present invention, reference is made to copending Holloway application Serial No. 180,174 for a full description and showing of the spotters K and respotters U and apparatus for operating them.

As shown in Fig. 1, each respotting unit U is provided with a pair of grippers designated generally asN which have mechanical linkage means associated therewithto actuate a normally closed switch 30 when a pin'is gripped by grippers N. The action of the grippers is such that when table T is lowered after the rolling of the first ball of a frame, and any pins are left standing on alley B, the heads of such pins will be engaged by the grippers and continued downward movement of table I results in concurrent inward movement of the grippers N to grip on or off-spot standing pins.

The switches 30 are connected in series so that whenever a pin is gripped by a gripper N. its associated switch is operated to break the series circuit connecting the ten switches. The construction and operation of the respotting unit U is substantially the same as that shown and described in copending Dumas application Serial Number 412,187, now U.S. Patent Number 2,890,886 and since it forms no specific part ofthe present invention, a detailed description herein of the respotting unit and its associated switching mechanism is deemed unnecessary.

When bowling pins are to be spotted on alley B, a solenoid 32 is energized. This rocks associated bellcrank lever and other mechanical linkage generally designated as Q and causes spotting units K to move from an inclined to a substantially vertical position when table T is located in position #III as indicated in Fig. 1, thereby resulting in the delivery of ten pins in spotted arrangement on alley B.

Table drive motor 31, through the mechanical linkage mentioned hereinabove, rotates a main driving shaft 34 which, in turn, drives the spotting and respotting units. A single cam operated switch generally indicated at TAl (Fig. 1) is mounted on shaft 34 and forms a part of the simplified and improved control circuit of the present invention and will be described in more detail hereinafter.

The control mechanism, selected for purposes of illustration, employed with collecting, pin handling, spotting and respotting mechanisms described hereinabove, may be termed a three-cycle system wherein there are provided three revolutions of table shaft 34 or three down and up trips of table T for each normal frame consisting of a first ball, or respot operation, and a second ball, or spotting operation. Each of these operations (ball cycles) requires one complete cycle of operation of sweep S which removes deadwood and unwanted pins from alley B.

There are four basic types of machine cycles generated by the electrical control system constructed and operated in accordance with the invention. These are:

(I) First ball cycle.--Respot operation, two trips of table T to and from alley B-machine resets to second ball.

(II) Second ball cycle.Normal second ball: Spotting operation, one trip of table T to and from alley B- machine resets to first ball. Second ball foul: Same as normal second ball operation except that a foul light indicates that a foul has ben committed.

(III) Strike cycle.Mechanical and electrical intelligence notifies machine to spot a new set of pins and reset to first ball-two trips of table T to and from alley B.

(IV) First ball foul cycle.Spotting operation-trip of table T to and from alley Bmachine resets to second ball and a foul signal is actuated.

Referring now to Fig. 3, power for the control circuit is furnished from aconventional, commercial source of voltage, such as 110 v.60 cycles, which is'applied to the circuit by means of main power lines 36, 38. Voltage from lines 36, 38 is applied through a safety fuse 39 to the primary of a transformer 40 which, in turn, supplies a low voltage to the main power control circuit consisting of a series circuit which has a switch 42, normally closed contacts CBla of a circuit breaker CB1 and the actuating coil of relay CR1. When manually operated switch 42 is closed, coil or relay CR1 is energized there- .by closing contacts CRla and CRlb which, in turn, con nect the primary of a multi-winding transformer 44 to the power line mains. Although switch 42 is represented as a single-pole, single-throw switch, yet it will be understood that it may represent one or more switches which may be positioned at convenient points about a bowling alley. For example, one switch may be positioned near the pin spotting end of an alley, while another is connected in series therewith and conveniently located at the controlling or managers desk for controlling a plurality of machines.

Transformer 44 is adapted to supply proper control voltages to the electro-magnetic control elements of the control mechanism, and preferably has relatively low voltage outputs in comparison with that received by lines 36, 38. Winding 46 of transformer 44 is connected to a pair of diode rectifiers 48 which, for purposes of illustration, are shown as connected in a manner such as to form a full-wave rectifier circuit in order to furnish D.C. to the control mechanisms where required. Transformer winding 46 is center tapped to provide a conventional return path for the full wave rectifier circuit and is connected to a common chassis ground line 76 through circuit breaker coil CB1. Thus it will be seen that when an overload occurs causing excessive current to be drawn into the control circuit, normally closed relay contacts CBla will open, thereby'de-energizing relay coil CR1 and opening contacts CRla and CRlb to remove all power from the control circuit. The closing of contacts CRla, CRlb also supplies power to pin elevating motor 10 which drives pin elevating mechanism F and distributor H.

Sweep motor 24 is connected to the main power lines 36, 38 through normally open contacts CR3a while table motor 31 is supplied power from lines 36, 38 through a normally open contact CRZa. Each of the motors 10, 24, 31 is protected by an individual thermo-overload unit 59, 52, 54 respectively, which may be of the type having a thermally expansible circuit breaking member with associated reset button. A light 56, provided for indicating that the machine is ready for a first ball, is illuminated by current from Winding 58 of transformer 44 flowing through an overload circuit breaker 60, and contact zero of level 3 of stepper relay 62.

Stepper relay 62 is used'to develop the program re-' quired for the several sequences necessary to the types of cycles of operation listed above and is substantially identical in construction to that described in detail in copending Dumas application Serial Number 412,187, now U.S. Patent Number 2,890,886. In the stepper relay illustrated in Fig. 3, six levels of contacts are used, and are accordingly designated #1#6, inclusive. Each level is provided with a home or zero contact and ten contacts corresponding to successive positions of the conventional rotary wiper arms. Any type of stepper relay construction may be used so long as it provides means for repetitive cycling of eleven contacts. It will be noted that the wiper arms of levels 1, 2, 3 are of the bridging or short I circuiting type, whereas the wiper arms of levels 4, 5, 6

are of the non-bridging or open circuiting type. All wiper arms are physically ganged together so that like contacts of each level are wiped by their respective arms.

Each level of contacts and its associated wiper arm selectively control the operation of particular elements of the machine. For example, in the illustrated embodiment of the invention disclosed herein, the wiper arm and contacts of level #1 control the starting of motor 24 and hence the operation of the sweep mechanism driven thereby. Level-#2, through associated wiper arm and contacts, controls the starting of motor 31 which lowers and raises table T. The wiper arm and associated con-. tacts of level #3 provide means for indicating to the bowler pinfall resulting from each first ball of a frame rolled, and for showing which ball of a frame is to be rolled, and also for indicating the occurrence of a strike.

The circuit with associated indicating lights operated V gases by level #3 is substantially similar to that operated by level #3 of the stepping switch shown and described in detail in Dumas application Serial Number 412,187.

The contacts and associated Wiper arm of level #4 control the operation of the timer motor TM1 which, acting in cooperation with cam switches 5A1 and TAl, arranges the programming of the machine. Levels #5 and #6 of stepping relay'dZ control the operation of the machine corresponding to pinfall resulting from a normal twoball frame, or a strike, and also insure the correct cycling of the machine when a foul is made. In addition, level #6 initiates the operation of the delivery of pins by the pin elevating mechanism to distributor H after table T has spotted a set of pins on alley B.

Stepper relay 62 is diagrammatically shown in Fig. 3 as having an actuating coil 64 which opens and closes a normally closed contact 65 in the conventional manner during each step of the switch so that the switch will move forward only one position for each impulse received by coil 64. A suitable resistor 68 and capacitor 7% are connected in series across normally closed contact 66 to aid in repressing any arcing of the contacts during the stepping operation. Stepping relay 62 operates in a conventional manner as will be understood by those skilled in the art.

A set of contacts, with associated wiper arm, corresponding to the main contacts of the six levels of the switch are shown in diagrammatic notation and generally indicated as 72. As all ten contacts are connected to gether, switch 72 may be in the form of a normally closed cam operated switch having a cam with a single lobe corresponding to the zero position of the wipers of the six levels, which is adapted to open the normally closed contacts in the zero position. The open zero contact of switch 72 insures that stepping relay 62 stops on a zero position when the self-stepping sequence is initiated. Push button P131, connected between the wiper arm of level #5 and through the contacts 72 to ground, is provided for the purpose of starting this self-stepping sequence.

Not all of the contacts of levels #1 through #6 are used. Each contact or step may be considered as representing a certain increment in the pin spotting machine cycle during which the control elements of the machine remain in a particular operative relationship. When it is necessary to change the operative relationship of the control elements of the machine, relay 62 is energized to advance the Wiper arms one or more steps. circuits energized by the various wiper arms of the stepper relay initiate or start operation of elements of the machine. The sweep and table cam, 5A1 and TAl respectively, and associated switches, or switches controlled by the timing motorTMl, stop the operation of these elements. Stepper relay 62 thereby'functions to coordinate, control and program the cyclical operations of the elements of the machine in accordance with prescribed rules of play.

If the contact positions are numbered 0 to It), as shown in Fig. 3, the following contact positions are used to provide the four basic machine cycles described hereinabove:

Normal first ball Steps 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, s, 7 Normal second ball Steps 7, 8, 9, l0, 0

First ball foul cycle Steps 0, l, 2, 6, 7

Strike cycle Steps 0, l, 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 10

Step 0 is ready for the first ball and Step 7 is ready for the second ball. 7

On a first ball foul cycle, although normal second ball spotting functions are executed, the machine completes its sequence, readyfor another second ball sequence, whereas on a strike cycle, where normal second ball spotting functions also are executed, the machine completes as, ready for first .ball. Both of these sequences, as well as av normal first ball cycle, start with contact or step'zero. Hence, a discrimination is made by the con- In general,

trol system toib oth the type of rnachine functions executed and the status of the machine at the completion of the cycle.v p A NORMAL TWO-BALL CYCLE 'First ball 7 W J The bowler rolls the first ball of a frame which, upon arriving in pit P (Fig. l), strikes cushioning device M and moves it rearwardly to engage and actuate starting switch SAl, pit switchlfi, step zero of level #5, the interruptor contacts 66 of stepper relay .62, and the solenoid coil 64 to line 74 to the center tap of rectifiers 48 which constitutes the positive terminal of the DC. power supply. As a result of energization of switch 62, the com tact fingers are advanced to step 1 of their respective levels.

As soon as the wiper fingersengagestep l, the sweep contactor CR3 (level #1) is energized through contact 1 of level #1 since the energizing coil of contactor CR3 is connected between ground line '76 and line 7 which is connected to one side of the secondary of transformer 44. Energizing contactor CR3 causes contacts CR3a to close, thereby energizing sweep motor 24 which causes the sweep generally designated asIS to move from its up per or dwell position and begin to descend to its lower or guard position adjacent alley B, as shown in broken lines in Fig. 1.

After approximately 30 degrees of rotation of the sweep shaft 28 driven by motor 24, the sweep cam switch SAl, affixed to shaft 28, is actuated thereby closing normally open contacts SAia and opening normally closed contacts SAlb. The stepper relay 62 is then advanced from step 1 to step 2 through a circuit consisting of line 76, contacts SAla (now closed), contact 1 of level #5,

V interrupter contact 66 and solenoid coil 64 to line 74.

fied as the 76 degree point on the cam 34 of sweep switch SAL When the 76 degree point is reached, contacts SAla of switch SAl open thereby breaking the circuit established through contacts 8AM and step 2 of level #1,.which, in turn, stops the sweep in the guard position. Simultaneously with the advancing of the stepper relay 62 to step 2,..a timer motor TM1 is energized through a circuit .including, starting with the ground line 76, normally closed contacts TAlc, contact 2 of level #6, normally closed contacts PRZa and contact 2 of level #4 to the motorcoils of timer motor TM1. Timer motor TM1 is preferably a conventional synchronous clock type motor which is adapted to run at substantially the same speed as the table driving shaft 34. Timer motor TM1 has a cam 77 which is adapted to open and close contacts TMl a and TMlb at intervals according to the contour of the face. of cam '77. The starting of timer motor TM1 defines the beginning of the time-delay interval required ,to delay the downward movement of the table T after the first ball of a frame is rolled in order to allow the time for standing pins to come to an equilibrium position, After approximately 2% seconds of operation, timer motor TM1, operating through cam 79, causescontacts TM1 a to close and TM ib to open.

Upon the closing of contacts Tlvila, the stepper relay is advanced from step 2 to step 3 through a'circuit including line 76, contacts TMla, step 2 of level #5, to the interruptor contact 66 of relay 62 and thence tothe solenoid coil 64 and return to positive line 74. When the stepper relay reaches step 3, a table motor starting circuit is actuated which causes the table to descend, at the operated and is usually in a normally closed position.

Switch 80 allows an operator to shut off the table motor when desired. One terminal of timer motor TM1 is connected to the junction point of relay CR2 and switch 80. Thus if table motor 31 is deenergized by inactivation of relay CR2, timer motor TM1 will be deenergized simul- 'taneously therewith. Hence the operation of the timer motor and table motor 31 are always maintained in synch'ronism with each other. As table T descends into pin gripping position relative to pins left standing on alley B after a ball has been rolled, grippers N of respotting units U are moved automatically to gripping position to grip any pins left standing for lifting and respotting. If there is at least one standing pin, then contacts 30a of switch 30, associated with the unit U corresponding to such pin, will be opened thereby preventing circuitry which controls the spotting operation from functioning and, conversely, allows the respotting operation to proceed. This circuitry is described in more detail hereinafter.

During the period in which the table moved downwardly, felt for and gripped standing pins, the timer motor continues to run for a period of 3% seconds measured from the time when the stepper advanced to step 3. The circuit for continuing the operation of the timer motor on step 3 includes connections between line 76, contact 3 of level #4 and the coil of TM1 through manually operated switch 80 to line 78. At the end of the approximately 3% seconds interval, the timer cam 78, which requires approximately six seconds to complete one revolution, returns to its zero position and allows contacts TMlb to close which completes the circuit from line 76 through contact 3 of level #5, the interruptor contact 66 and solenoid coil 64 of relay 62 and line 78, thereby stepping stepper relay 62 from step 3vto step 4. The table driving shaft 34 continues to revolve and causes the table to continue on its respotting cycle when the stepper reaches step 4 since table actuating relay CR2 is held in an operative position through a circuit including line 76, normally closed contacts PR3d, step 4 of level #2, coil CR2 and one side of secondary winding 46 of transformer 44.

Upon reaching step 4, the motor 24 of sweep S is energized, thereby causing the sweep S to move from its guard position, run-through, and clear the deadwood from the alley. The initiation of the sweep movement at this point of the cycle is accomplished through a circuit including line 76, contacts SAlb, step 4 of level #1, sweep control relay CR3, a manually operated, normally closed switch 82 to line 78. Switch 82' is similar to switch 80 and provides a means for manually stopping the operation of the sweep at any'point in its cycle when desired. The sweep continues to run until it has completely swept the alley of fallen pins and returns to its forward position, which is at a point approximately 270 degrees from the start of the sweep revolution. When the 270 degree point is reached, the sweep cam 84, which has two switch actuating lobes, operates to open COD: tacts SAlb, thereby stopping the sweep.

At the same time that contacts SAlb are opened, contacts SAla are closed causing stepping relay 62 to step from step .4 to step 5 through a circuit including line 76',

TAla at approximately the 350 degree point in order to contacts SAla, contact 4 of level #5, interruptor contact 66, solenoid coil 64 of stepping relay 62 and line 74.

Meanwhile, the table has continued to run on step 4 and passes through the zero or home position with respect to table actuating shaft 34 and by the time the stepper relay has advanced to step 5, the table T has started its second revolution which ultimately places the standing pins back on the alley bed. The circuit for continuing the movement of table T on step 5 includes line 76, contacts PR3d, contact 5 of'level #2, coil CR2, switch 80 and line 78. When the table reaches the 260 degree point of its second revolution, the stepper relay 62 is stepped from step 5 through step 6 to step 7 through the circuit including contacts TAlb, steps 5 and 6 of level #5 which are connected together, and the interruptor contact 66 to the coil 64 of stepper relay 62. At the 260 degree point, shaft 34 causes cam operated switch TA1 to actuate and close contacts TAla and TAlb. Closing of contacts TAlb causes the stepper to advance from step 5 to step 7 as previously described. Closing of contacts TAla causes the table shaft 34 to continue to revolve until the 350 degree-360 degree, or substantially zero position at the end of the second revolution is reached. Circuit for accomplishing this includes contacts TAla, relay coil CR2 and switch 80. When the zero position is reached, contacts TAla againvopen and the table movement is halted in the zero position. It is preferable that the table switch cam 35 open contacts allow for any overrun which might occur.

Upon reaching step 7, the sweep motor 24 is again actuated and the sweep rises from its forward or guard position to its zero position through a circuit comprising contacts SAla, step 7 of level #1, coil CR3 and switch 82. It will be remembered that the sweep shaft 28 during this interval rotates from a 270 degreeposition to its zero position, thereby rotating cam 84 of switch SA1 during which period contacts SAla have been held closed. When the zero position is reached, contacts SAla open and stop movement of the sweep which is now in its home or zero position. The machine has now completed its first ball cycle and'is ready for a second ball.

Second ball As with the first ball, the second ball rolls against the cushioning device M and operates pit switch 26 closing its contacts. This completes the circuit consisting of line 76, normally closed sweep switch contacts SAlb, pit switch contacts 26 and contact 7 of level 5, interruptor contact 66, to solenoid 64 of relay 62 to line 74. Closing of the contacts 26 causes the stepper relay to move to step 7 8. On this step the sweep motor 24 is started by the energization of relay CR3 through a circuitincluding contact 8 of step 1. After the sweep driving shaft 28 has been revolved by motor 24 to approximately the 30 degree point, the cam operated switch SA1 is actuated, thereby closing contacts SAla which, in turn, advance stepper relay to step 9 in a circuit including contacts SAla, contact 8 of level #5, interruptor contact 66 and solenoid coil 64 of stepper relay 62.

On step 9 the sweep continues to advance to the 76 degree position which is the end of the first switch closing lobe on cam 84 through a circuit including contacts SAla, contact 9 of level #1 and sweep actuating relay coil CR3. At the 76 degree point contacts SAla return to their normally open position, thereby de-energizing relay CR3 and stopping the sweep motor 24 and sweep S adjacent the alley B. Advancing of the stepper switch to step 9 energizes timer motor TM1 through a circuit consisting of line 76, normally closed contacts TAlc, con- I bling after the ball was rolled are allowed to come to rest on the alley B. After the 2% second period has ended, the stepper is advanced to step through a circuit comprising timer contacts TMla, contact 9 of level #5, interruptor contact 66 and solenoid coil 64 of stepper relay 62. On step 10 the timer motor TMI continues to rotate as energy is supplied thereto by contacts TMla and contact 10' oflevel #4. The timer motor TMl continues to run for another 3% seconds or until cam 77 has revolved one revolution whereupon the switch actuating lobe of cam 77 concludes its operation and TMla opens, there by opening the circuit through contact 10 of level #4 and stopping the operation of timer motor TMl. When the stepper reaches step 10, the sweep motor 24 is again started through energization of sweep contactor CR3 which closed contacts CR3a. The circuit for performing this operation includes line 76, normally closed contacts SAlb, contact 10 of level #1, the coil of relay CR3, switch 82 and line '78. l

The sweep now proceeds from its 76 degree point which is the guard position and performs its run-through, sweeping all pins, whether standing or fallen, into the pit and continues to a position which is approximately 270 degrees of rotation of sweep driving shaft 28 in which position the sweep is again in the guard position adjacent the alley B; At this point, the second contactactuating lobe on cam 84 is again in operation, so that contacts SAlb are opened, thereby stopping the sweep motor 24 by de-energization of relay coil CR3. 7

On step 10, spotting control relay PR2 is energize through a circuit comprising contacts TAlc, contact 10 of level #6, normally closed contacts 22 (provided there are 10 pins on the table) and the coil of relay PR2. Once closed, relay PR2 is held closed through a holding circuit comprising the normally closed contacts of pin counting switch 16 and contacts PR2c.

When relay PR2'is energized, contacts PR2) close, thereby preparing circuitry for the subsequent application of power through contacts CRZa to spotting solenoid 32 which, when energized, releases a spotting mechanism so that when table T descends to spotting position, the'ten pins held in spotters H will be spotted on alley B.

After the sweep run-through is completed and the cam 84 of sweep cam switch SA1 has reached the 270 degree position whereby contacts SAla are closed, table relay CR2 is then closed, thereby applying power and starting table motor 31 by closing contacts CRZa which at the same time energizes spotting solenoid 3-2. This is accomplished through a circuit which includes line 76, contacts SAM, contacts PR2b, contact 10 of level #2 through the coil CR2, switch '86} to line 78.

The table then starts through its spotting operation cycle in which ten pins are placed upon the alley B. When table drive shaft 34 is revolved through approximately 260 degrees, the switch actuating lobe on the table cam 35 closes contacts TAib. This completes a circuit from line 76 through contacts 'TAlb, contact It of level #5, interruptor contact 66, and relay coil 64 to line 78 which advances the stepper relay to step zero. When the stepper relay steps tothe zero position, relay PR1, the pinfeed control relay, is energized throughthe circuit which includes line 76, contacts 'IAlb, contacts -PR2d and the coil of relay PR1 to line 74. When PR1 is energized, contacts PRia are closed thereby allowing current to flow to pin elevator solenoid 18 and the pinfeed operation is commenced.

As the switch actuating lobe on cam 35 of switchTAl closed contacts TAla at 260 degrees of the spotting revolution, the table contactor CR2 remains energized through these contacts until the zero position is reached, whereupon contacts TAla are opened by the cam 35 of switch TA1 and CR2 is de-energized so that the table will stop in the zero or home position. When thezero step position of stepper relay 62 is reached, sweep motor relay CR3 is again energized through the closedcontacts level #1. The sweep motor continues to run until shaft 28 has rotated to the 360 degree position whereupon cam 34 allows contacts SAla to open and de-energizes sweep motor relay CR3 thus stopping the sweep in'the up or dwell position. The pin spotting machine is now ready for the first ball'of a new cycle.

It will be noted that pin counting switch 16 is a me.- chanica'l ly operated switch and it will also be noted that the pin feed solenoid actuating relay PR1 is held closed and thus allows ten pins 'to be distributed by means for the mechanically operated, normally open contacts 16b of pin counting contacts 16. In order to initiate the starting of a first pin so that contacts 16b will hold relay PR1 in energized condition, a by-pass or holding circuit is provided which comprises normally closed contacts 16a in series with contacts PRZc which hold the relay coil of relay PR2 in an energized position once it has been energized on the previous step 10 through contact 10 of level #6. As PR2 remains energized through step 10 to step zero, contacts PRZd are held closed, thus allowing current to flow through contacts TAib or TAlc as the table moves, the choice of contacts depending on whether the table has reached its zero position or not. After the first pin has passed into distributor H and down chute I, normally closed contacts 16a of pin counting switch 16 open, thus allowing relay PR2 to drop out while contacts 16b close and hold relay PR1 closed with the consequent actuation of pin elevator solenoid 18 until ten pins have been delivered.

When the tenth pin has ben delivered to the distributor, contacts 16b thenopen and solenoid 18 is consequently deenergized through the de-energization of the coil of relay PR1. It will be 'noted that if, when the table has reached approximately 350 degrees of its spotting operation a'nd the first pin has not been delivered to the distributor H, and contacts 16b are still open, relay PR1 will be energized through the circuit consisting of contacts TAlc, contact zero of level #6 and contacts PRZa. The coil of PR1 will be deenergized onstep 1 but is reenergized on step 2 of the next first ball cycle through the circuit which includes contacts 'TAlc, contact 2 of level #6, and contacts PRZd to coil of PR1. As long as relay PR2 is energized; that is, as long as COB? tacts 16a are closed, indicating that a pin has not-ye t been delivered to the distributor H, the stepping relay will remain on step 2 of the next first ball cycle until the first pin has been delivered to the distributor since the contacts TMla of timer motor TMl must be closed in order to cause stepper relay to step from step 2 to step 3 through contact 2 of level #5. However, the timer mo. tor is rendered inoperative on step 2 as long as contacts PR2a are held open by actuation of relay PR2. When PR2 is de-energized, the timer operates normally through a circuit which includes contacts TAic, contact 2 oflevel #6, contacts PRZa and contact 2 of level #4 to the coil of timer motor TMl.

STRIKE CYCLE The-strike cycle occurs when a bowler'knocks down-all ten pins upon the rolling of a firstball of a fframe. For the first'three steps programmed by the stepper relay 62, the strike cycle is substantiallythe same as a normal first: ball cycle; i. e., when'a'ball is rolled, switch 26' closes and causes stepper relay62 to advance from step zero as heretofore and begin-theprogramming cycle. Then.the sweep moves downward into its guard position adjacent alley B on steps one and two an the normal 2% second time delay ,oQCu Z a the end of which time delay, table I moves down into a position adjacent the alley B where" grippers N of spotting units K feel for standing pins. As no pinsremain standing because a strike has been rolled, all of the contacts of series connected switches 30 remain closed. Table T then ascends as it continues its operating cycle. At the end of the normal 3% second 13 timing period, timer contacts TMlb close and advance stepper relay 62 to step 4. i

When the stepper relay reaches step 4, relay PR4 will be energized through a circuit which includes line 76, contacts TAlc, contact 4 of level #6, contacts PR3b, contacts of switches 30 (now closed since no pins were left standing) to the coil of relay PR4 and line 74. Relay PR4 is held closed through a holding circuit comprising contacts PR4a and the normally closed contacts of cam operated switch 72. Upon closing of contacts of relay PR4, the stepper relay is advanced to step through a circuit including line 76, contacts PR4;f contact 4 of level #5, interruptor contact 66 and the coil 64 of stepper relay 62 to line 74. When the stepper relay is positioned on'step 5, the sweep continues to run through since the sweep control relay CR3 is energized through a circuit including contacts SAlb, contact 5 of level #1 to the coil of relay CR3. The table also continues to runsince table motor control relay CR2 remains energized on .step 5 through a circuit which includes contacts PR3d, contact 5 of level #2 to the coil of relay CR2.

When the table reaches approximately 260 degrees of rotation of shaft'34, the contacts of switch TA1 are ac-. tuated and the stepper relay is advanced from step 5 through step 6 to step 7 by the circuit which includes con-. tacts TAlb, contacts 5 and 6 of level #5, interruptor contact 66 to the coil 64 of stepping relay 62. However, the table continues to move as table motor 31 remains energized from 260 degrees to the substantially zero position by a circuit which includes line 76, contacts TAla and the coil of relay CR2, switch-80 to line 78. Relay CR2 is deenergized and the table motor stopped when the zero position of shaft 34 is reached as contacts TAla open at that point. The sweep continues to run as relay CR3 remains energized on step 7 through a circuit consisting of contacts PR4f, and contact 7 of level #1 to the coil of relay CR3.

When the table reaches a position between 350 and 360 degrees, the stepper is advanced from step 7 through. steps 8 and 9 to step 10 by means of a circuit which includes contacts TAlc, now closed, contacts 7, 8 and 9 of level #6, contacts PR4b, interruptor contact 66 to the coil 64 of stepper relay 62. During this period and in-- cluding step 10, the sweep motor continues to operate the sweep as its energizing circuit remains operative, since relay CR3 is energized through contacts SAlb, contact 10 of level #1 to the coil of relay CR3. Contacts SAlb are, opened when the sweep cam 84 reaches a position at approximately 270 degrees and the circuit just described is de-energized.

On step 10, relay PR2, the spotting control relay, is actuated by a circuit which includes contacts TAlc, con-' tact 10 of level #6, contact 22 to the coil of relay PR2. When-relay PR2 is energized, table motor contactor CR2 is also energized through a circuit consisting of contacts SAla, or PR4 contacts PRZb, and contact 10 of level #2. The spot solenoid 32 then closes through contacts CR2a and PR2a, and the table starts its spotting operation. When the table has reached the approximately 260 degree point of its second revolution, contacts TAlb close and complete a circuit through contact 10 of level 5 to interruptor contact 66 and coil 64 of stepper relay 62 so that the stepper relay advances to step zero. The table motor contactor CR2 remains energized during this stepping operation and is deenergized when contacts 1 TAla are opened at the 350 to 360 degree interval of table rotation.

When the stepper relay is advanced to its zero position, the sweep motor 24 is again started, moving the sweep to its 360 degree position through a circuit which includes contacts SAla, closed at this point, contact zero of level #land the coil of relay CR3. The sweep motor remains energized until shaft 28 and associated cam 84 have reached their 360 degree or zero position at which time contacts SAla open to de-energize sweep contactor CR3.

FIRST-BALL FOUL CYCLE When a foulis committed on the rolling of a first ball of a frame, relay PR3 will be energized by the closure of the foul switch 86. .If desired, relay PR3 may be energized bythe receipt of a signal from an automatic foul detecting and signalling unit (notshown), such, for example, as shown and described in copending Dumas application Serial Number 141,018, filed January 28, 1950, for Foul Detecting andSignalling Mechanism, now US. Patent Number 2,683,602. Although a foul has occurred, the control mechanism of the machine operates the same as for a normal first-ball cycle for the first two steps. Thus the arrival of the ball-in the pit causes starting switch 26 to, actuate and energize solenoid'coil 64, stepper relay 62, causing it to advance one step. As

soonas the ,wiper fingers of stepper relay 62 engage step 1, sweep contactor CR3 is energized through contact 1 of level 1 and sweep motor 24 is energized so that the sweep S moves ,from its dwellposition and descends to its lower or guard position adjacent alley B.

After approximately 30 degrees of rotation of the sweep shaft 28, sweep-cam switch SAl is actuated and contacts" SAla are closed so that stepper relay 62 is advanced from step 1 to step 2 through a circuit comprising contacts SAla, contact 1 of level #5 to the interruptor contact 66' of relay 62. When the sweep reaches its lower or guard position, contacts SAla are opened which breaks the circuit established through contacts SAla, and step 2 oflevel #l,, thereby stopping the sweep in the guard posi-' tion. vThe timer motorTMl is energized as on the first ball cycle when'stepper relay advances to step 2 through a circuit which includes contacts TAlc, contact 2 of level #6, contacts PRZa, and contact 2 of level #4 to the motor coils of timing motor TM1. After the 2% second timing period has passed, contacts TMla of timing motor TMl are closed, thereby completing the circuit through step 2 oflevel #5 to the interruptor contact of relay 62; thence to solenoid coil 64, so that stepper relay 62 is advanced'frorn step 2 to step 3.

Onstep 3 it is immediately advanced to step 4'through acircuit consistingof contacts TAlc, contact 3 of level #6, contacts PR3a, now closed, through the actuation of foul relay PR3, and interruptor contact 66 to the solenoid coil 64 of relay 62. Upon reaching step #4, the stepper relay is again'immediately stepped to step 5 as contacts P R3c connect step 4 to the circuit just described. On

step 5 the stepper relay 62 is again advanced immediately to step 6 which also is connected to the circuit just described through contact 5 of level #6 and contacts PR3a.

- On steps 4, 5 and 6 the sweep motor contactor CR3 is held in an energized position through a circuit which' includes sweep 0am switch contacts SAlb and contacts 4, 5,*and 6 of level #1 to the solenoid coil CR3. The

operation of the sweep at this point thus results in the sweeping of all pins, standing or fallen, into pit P. Upon 1 completion of the sweeping operation, and when the sweep drive shaft 28 has moved to approximately 270 degrees of the sweep cycle, sweep cam switch SAl is again actuated so that contacts SAlb are opened and the sweep motor contactor CR3 is de-energized, thus stopping sweep motor 31.

On step 6, the control relay PR2 is energized through a-circuitTwhich'includes contacts TAlc, contact 6 joffl level #6,*and normally closed contacts 22 to coilofrelay PR2. Relay PR2 remains'energized through the holding circuit which includes contacts 16a and'PRZc. The timer motor, which was energized on steps 1, 2 and 3, continues to run on step 6 through a circuit which in cludes contacts TMla, contact 6 of level #4, to motor TMl, and stops itself when the timer contacts TMla are opened at the end of one revolution of timer cam 77. When the sweep has completed its run-through and reached the 270 degree point, it will be recalled that cam operated switch SA1 closes contacts SAla and opens contacts SAlb. Closing of contacts SAla completes a circuit through contacts PR2b, contact 6 of level #2 to the coil of relay CR2 so that the table motor is energized and a spotting cycle for the table is started. The table then travels through a portion of its cycle during which spotters H deliver a new set of pins to alley B.

It will be noted that spotting occurs during this cycle of, the tables operation so that spotting solenoid 32 is actuated by the closure or contacts CR2a and PR2a which are held closed due to the previous actuation of relay PR2 on step 6. When the table has reached approximately 260 degrees of its first revolution, table cam switch TA1 is actuated and the stepper relay 62 is accordingly advanced to step 7 through a circuit which includes contacts TAlb, contact 6 of level #5, and the interruptor contact 66 to the coil 64 of stepper relay 62. At the 260 degree point, the table continues 'to move since relay CR2 is held closed by the closing of contacts TAla when cam switch TA1 was actuated at the 2 60 degree point. The table'continues to move upwardly until shaft 34 has reached approximately the 350 degree position when cam 35 allows contacts TA-la to open thereby de-energizingrelay CR2 and stopping the table at its zero or home position.

The sweep which, it will be recalled, was in its guard position adjacent alley B after having swept deadwood from the alley B is set in motion again on step 7 by energization of sweep motor 24 through a circuit which includes contacts SAla, contact 7 of level #'1,'to the coil of relay CR3.

When the sweep reaches 360 degrees, or its dwell position, the contacts of switch SA1 are returned to their normal positions so that contacts SAIa open and relay CR3 is deenergized, thus stopping the sweep. The machine is now ready for its second ball.

When the table shaft 34 has revolved to approximately the 260 degree position and switch TA1 is actuated as previously mentioned, the closing of contacts TA1bcauses the pin feed relay PR1 to close througha-circuit which includes contacts TAlb and contacts 'PR2d. As mentioned in the description of the first=ball'cycle, when the first pin is fed to the distributor H, contacts 16b are-- closed by the pin, thereby holding relay' coil PR1 in an energized condition until the passage-of the tenth pin allows the contacts 16b to open. If, howeverythe first pin has not entered distributor Hby the time that contacts TAib are opened'due to the rotation of table shaft 34 to the 360 degree or zero position, which event would allow relay PR1 to be de-energized, PR1 remains energized through a circuit which includes contacts TAlc (now closed), contact 7 of level 6; contactsPR4c, contactsPRZd to'the coil of relay PR1; In the event that a; first pin has not entered distributor H-by the time that the control mechanism has'reached step '9 of a second-ball cycle, themachine is held on this step'until a first pin is received by a circuit which includes contacts TAllc; contact 9 of level 6, contacts PR4c and contacts PR2a,-contact 9 of level #4 to thetirnermatonTMl.

Since PR2 is held in anenergized conditionas long as contacts 16a remain closed due to the absence of a first pin passing through chute I of distributor H, then normally closed contacts PR2a are held: open preventing the timer motor TMl from running and advancing stepper relay 62 to step 10. When a first pin-'isreceived, the

allowed to close with the result that timer motor TMI starts and advances stepper relay 62 to step 10 as described heretofore.

SECOND-BALL .FOUL CYCLE 1 For a second-ball foul there is no differentiation in machine cycles since the operations necessary for a second-ball are identical to those necessary for a normal second-ball cycle. That is, all remaining pins are swept from the alley, a complete new set of pins are spotted and the machine is returned to a ready for first ball condition.

PIN INDICATOR CIRCUITS The pin indicator circuit associated with level #3- is substantially the same as that shown anddescribed in copending Dumas application Serial Number 412,187 and will therefore be described only briefly. Thus, lights are mounted so that they are visible by the player and indicate whether a first ball, second ball, or strike has been rolled and which pins remain standing. Thus a light 56, indicating a first ball has been rolled, is operated through contacts z'ero through 6, inclusive. of level #3 of stepper relay 62 and will be lighted whenever the stepper relay is in any of these positions. which indicates that a second ball has been rolled, is operated through contacts 7 through 10, inclusive, of level #3 of stepper relay 62 andjnormally closed contacts PR4d and will be lighted whenever the stepper is in any of these positions provided the strike relay PR4 isnot energized; A light 90, indicating that a strike has been'rolled, is actuated through a circuit which includes contacts 7' through 10, inclusive, of level #3 of stepper relay 62 and the normally opencontacts of relay PR4, since .relay PR4 is energized as outlined in the description of the strike cycle hereinabove. Lamps 92, associated with each'one of the pins, are energized by means MACHINE PROTECTION CIRCUIT If, during an first-ball cycle, the table should descend upon a standing pin which has been moved out of range of one of the respotting units U and grippers N, either by the action of the ball or engagement with other pins, either one or both of normally open contacts of switches 94 are closed. These switches 94 are pressure operated switches and are mounted at suitable positions on the table suspension mechanism and are adapted to be closed by upward pressurelagainst the table by a foreign object. Closure of switches-94short ,circuits line 79 to ground: and thereby creates anexcessive current fiow through the circuit breaker CB1 whichcauses it to actuate and open contacts CBia in the main power control circuit which, in turn,-causes CR1 to de energize and open contacts CRIia which cuts off all power to the control mechanism. The machine cannot be restarted until the ofi-limit pin has been removed and the control circuit brealrer CB1 re-set.

without the need for rolling a ball, the control circuit is provided with a manually operable switch 96 connected in parallel with contacts of the pit switch 26. When switch 96 is operated, the starting circuit of the machine is completed, simulating the action-normally effected by the arrival of a ball in the pit P as described above. If the switch 96 is actuated twice,-the machine operates througha normal two-ball cycle.

A light 88,

TENTH FRAME SPARE When a bowler makes a spare on the tenth frame of a game, he is entitled under the rules to an additional ball. As a result of rolling this ball, the machine goes through a normal first-ball cycle and comes to rest as ready for the second ball ofa frame. In order to manually cycle the machine and place it in readiness for the first ball of a frame, i.e. the first ball of the first frame of the .neXt game, there is provided a manually operable switch 98 having contacts connected in parallel with switches 26 and 96. When switch 98 is operated, the machine is cycled as described hereinabove without the necessity of rolling a second ball, which is not permitted under the rules. Switch 98 is preferably located adjacent the approach end of an alley where it is convenient to the bowler.

FRAME COUNTER An electro-magnetically operated counter CR is connected in the main power control circuit in order to provide a totalizing count of the number of frame cycles played during a period of operation of the machine. Counter CR5 is energized once each frame cycle by a circuit which includes contacts TAlc, contact 1 of level #6 to transformer 40. It.will be seen that when one side of the secondary of transformer 40 is connected to ground, coil of counter CR5 is energized and a count is registered.

-It will be noted that in operating through each cycle whether it be a first ball, second ball, strike, or foul, the control circuit of the present invention is sequenced through a fixed program common to all cycles, which is immediately followed by a variable program sequence depending upon the nature of the cycle demanded from the machine. The first program sequence includes the actuation of pit switch 26, the stepping of relay 62 at least one step, the movement of sweep S from a dwell position to a guard position adjacent alley B and the energization of timer motor TM1. The second program is initiated after timer motor TMl has run for the 2% second interval, at which time it causes the stepper relay to begin to program the selected cycle.

By selectively programming information supplied by the sweep, table and timer motor cams,.and', in special instances, by the foul and strike switches,stepper relay 62 during the second programming sequence thus causes the pin spotting machine to perform a particular cycle,

as required by the rules of a bowling game, in response to the rolling of each ball.

While the present invention has been disclosed by means of specific illustrative embodiments thereof, it would be obvious to those skilled in the art that various changes and modifications in the means of operation described or in the apparatus, may be made without departing from the spirit of the invention as defined in the, appended claims. 1

I claim:

1. In a bowling pin spotting machine of the type having a movable table with a plurality 'of pin spotting and respotting devices mounted thereon, a movable sweep and electrical control mechanism including a multi-level stepper relay having a plurality of spaced contacts oneach level and associated electrical control circuits for effecting concurrent operation of-said table and saidfsweep during each ball operating cycle of said machine, in comcircuit means includinga third level of saidrelay con-- tacts operative to actuate said. relay and cause said relay to selectively activate s'aid sweep and tablecontrol cir-v cuits for concurrent operation of said table and sweep y. during each ball operating cycle of. said machine, means connected to said master control circuit and operative 18 in response to the rolling of each ball of a frame for initiating the actuation of said relay, a timing device having means for effecting the operation thereof independent of the motion and relative position of said table and said sweep and having a predetermined cycling period with first and second time intervals, said operating means of said timing device being connected to selected contacts of a fourth level of said stepper relay and activated therebyafter the commencement of a first ball cycle, means actuated by said timing device at the end of said first time interval for causing said stepper relay to advance and energize said table control circuit so that said table descends and picks up standing pins, and means actuated by said timing device and operative at the end of said second time interval for energizing said sweep circuit to cause said sweep to sweep fallen pins from the alley.

2. The invention defined in claim 1 wherein said control mechanism includes circuit means responsive to the rolling of a first ball foul connected to said master control circuit means and operative after said timing device has advanced said relay at the end of said first time interval for causing said master control circuit to energize said relay and program said machine through a foul cycle including by-passing said second time interval so that all pins are swept from the alley immediately upon the completionof said first time interval.

' interval whenever said table control circuit is deenergizcd to provide operation of said timer and said table in cyclical synchronism.

5. In a bowling pin spotting machine of the type having a movable table with a plurality of pin spotting and respotting devices mounted thereon, a movable sweep and electrical control mechanism including a multi-level stepperrelay having a plurality of spaced contacts on each level and associated electrical control circuits for effecting concurrent operation of said table and said sweep during each ball operating cycle of said machine, in combination an electrical control circuit connected to selected contacts of a first level of said stepper relay for actuating said table, an electrical control circuit connected to selected contacts of a second level of said stepper relay for actuating said sweep, master control circuit means including a third level of said relay contacts operative to actuate said relay and cause said relay to selectively activate "said sweep and table control circuits for concurrent operation of said-table and sweep during each ball operating cycle of said machine, means "connected to said master control circuit and operative inresponse to therolling of each ball of a frame for initiating the actuation of said relay including energizing said sweep control cricuit to move said sweep a predetermined distance, a timing device having means for eifectingthezoperation therof independent of the motion and relative position ofvsaid table and said sweep and having a predetermined cycling period with first and second time intervals, said operating means of said timing device being connected to selected contacts of a fourth level of saidstepper relay and activated thereby after the commencement of a first ball cycle, means connected to said timing device operating means and operative when said sweep has traveled said predetermined distance for deenergizing said sweep control circuit, and energizing 19 up standing pins, and means actuated by said timing device and operative at the end of said second time interval for energizing said sweep circuit to cause said sweep to sweep fallen pins from the alley.

6. In a bowling pin spotting machine of the type having a movable table with a plurality of pin spotting and respotting devices mounted thereon, a movable sweep and electrical control mechanism including a multi-level stepper relay having a plurality of spaced contacts on each level and associated electrical control circuits for efiecting concurrent operation of said table and said sweep during each ball operating cycle of said machine, in combination an electrical control circuit connected to selected contacts of a first level of said stepper relay for to the rolling of a strike to cause said master control circuit to actuate said relay and energize selected contacts of each level to program said table and said sweep through a strike cycle, a timing device having means for effecting the operation thereof independent of the motion and relative position of said table and. said sweep and having a predetermined cycling period with first and second time intervalsgsaid operating means of said timing device being connected to selected contacts of a fourth level of said stepper relay and activated thereby after the commencement of a first ball cycle and the rolling of a strike, means actuated by said timing device at the end of said first time'interval for causing said stepper relay to advance and energize said table control circuit so that said table descends to feel for standing pins, and means actuated by said timing device and operative at the end of said second time interval for energizing said sweep circuit to cause said sweep to sweep all pins from the alley.

References Cited in the file of this patent V UNITED STATES PATENTS Dumas June 16, 1959

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3138378 *Mar 29, 1961Jun 23, 1964American Mach & FoundryAutomatic pinspotter spare practice device having selectively deactivated respottingunits
US3143345 *Aug 16, 1961Aug 4, 1964Harry SilberglaitCoin operated control system for bowling alleys
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US5759108 *Jun 21, 1996Jun 2, 1998Heddon; WillBowling alley pinsetter and method for handling spent balls and pins
Classifications
U.S. Classification473/65
International ClassificationA63D5/08
Cooperative ClassificationA63D5/08
European ClassificationA63D5/08