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Publication numberUS2983650 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 9, 1961
Filing dateDec 12, 1958
Priority dateJul 31, 1958
Publication numberUS 2983650 A, US 2983650A, US-A-2983650, US2983650 A, US2983650A
InventorsRubin Saul Howard
Original AssigneeHoffmann La Roche
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Panthenol aerosol hair spray
US 2983650 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

PANTHENOL AEROSOL HAIR SPRAY Saul Howard Rubin, Nutley, N.J., assignor to Hoifmann- 'lll aa Roche Inc., Nutley, N.J., a corporation of New erse No Drawing. Filed Dec. 12, 1958, Ser. No. 779,841

13 Claims. (Cl. 167-871) This invention relates to improved cosmetic preparations, packaged in forms convenient for use by the consumer; and to methods of using said preparations. More particularly, it relates to aerosol hair sprays and to the application thereof to the hair. The designation aerosol hair sprays is used for convenience herein to describe liquid cosmetic preparations of the type intended to be dispensed upon the hair under pressure in the form of liquid-gas aerosols. The invention relates especially to aerosol hair sprays intended to be used as hair sets and hair conditioners, i.e. those which 'are sprayed upon the hair especially in order to keep the hair in set position or make it manageable when it is combed or coifed.

Aerosol hair sprays of this general character are well known in the prior art. The hair-setting action has usually been attributed to the presence of a setting ingredient, believed to function at least partly by formation of a film on the hair shaft upon evaporation of the solvent vehicle. In the past, various materials have been used as setting ingredients, especially such materials as shellacs, ethyl cellulose, carboxymethyl cellulose, gum arabic, polyvinyl alcohol, copolymers of vinyl acetate and vinyl pyrrolidone, and-especially important in commercially successful hair spray compositions of the recent pastpolyvinlypyrrolidone (PVP).

A fundamental improvement taught by the present invention is the use of panthenol (pantothenyl alcohol) as a setting and hair conditioning ingredient in aerosol hair spray compositions of the type discussed above; if desired, in admixture with prior art hair conditioning ingredients, such as lanolin derivatives, higher aliphatic acid derivatives, higher aliphatic alcohols, esters, and the like; and preferably (but not obligatorily) in the absence of prior art setting ingredients. That is, it is preferred that panthenol be the sole setting ingredient in the hair spray composition.

Panthenol can be employed either in the racemic or in an optically active form, but dl-panthenol is ordinarily preferred.

It will be understood by those skilled in the art that ingredients of the hair spray composition other than the setting ingredient may be of conventional types. Thus, it will often be advantageous to incorporate such materials as perfumes, antistatic agents, auxiliary hair conditioning agents, plasticizers, antihygroscopic agents, and the like. The perfume ingredient can, of course, be chosen to the formulators taste. Exemplary of antistatic agents contemplated are such materials as: that known under the proprietary designation Atlas G263,

available from the Hercules Powder Company, Wilmington, Delaware, this material being essentially N-cetyl-N- ethyl-morpholinium ethosulfate; and that known under the proprietary designation Zelec NK, available from E. I. duPont de Nemours & Co. (Inc.), Wilmington, Delaware, this material being essentially an anionic composition of alcohol phosphates described in Du Pont Patent 2,676,122. Exemplary of auxiliary hair condition- "ice ing agents contemplated are, for example, myristyl alcohol, cetyl alcohol, stearyl alcohol, isopropyl myristate, polyglycols (e.g. polyethylene glycols, such as Carbowax 4000) and lanolin and various of its derivatives, e.g. lanolin esters and polyoxyethylene lanolins. The latter may be conveniently used in the form of the series of materials known by theproprietary designation Lanogel, available from Robinson Wagner Co., Inc., New York, New York. The various Lanogel preparations constitute an array of polyoxyethylene lanolins of varying ethylene oxide polymer chain length, which form aqueous solutions having viscosities ranging from those of freeflowing liquids to those of thick, viscous pastes, depending upon the concentration of the active material. Lanogel 21 is a 50% active aqueous gel, forming turbid dispersions in Water, which become clear on dilution with ethanol or isopropanol. Lanogel 31 is. a 50% active aqueous gel, which forms clear aqueous solutions (really dispersions) without the addition of alcohol. Where a film forming or setting ingredient is desired in addition to panthenol, it has been found convenient to employ ethyl cellulose T-lO, available from Hercules Powder Company, Wilmington, Delaware; this material being an ethyl cellulose of 48.S50% ethoxyl content and having a viscosity of 10 centipoises, when measured at 5% concentration and 25 C.

Conventional liquefied gas propellants, of the type employed in prior art aerosol hair sprays, can be employed. It is preferred to employ fluorinated hydrocarbon propellants, of the kind available under the proprietary designation Freon from E. I. duPont de Nemours & Co. (Inc.), Wilmington, Delaware; or under the proprietary designation Genetron from Allied Chemical & Dye Corporation, New York, New York; or under the proprietary designation Isotron from Pennsalt Chemicals Corporation, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Useful propellants are those made by compounding mixtures of various Freon individuals, e.g. Freon 11 (trichloromonofluoromethane), Freon 12 (dichlorodifluoromethane) and Freon 114 (symmetrical dichlorotetrafluoroethane). Especially useful are mixtures of Freon 11 land Freon l2, and of Freon l2 and Freon 114, in the proportions recommended by the manufacturers for pressure ranges of 12-60 p.s.i.g.

As distinguished from the propellant-which is discussed above, and which constitutes one of the two major subdivisions of the compositions according to the present inventionthe concentrate constitutes the other major subdivision of the novel compositions. The concentrate contains those ingredients which are to be applied to the hair and to remain upon the hair, i.e. panthenol and such optional ingredients (e.g. antistatic agents, perfumes, hair conditioners, etc., previously referred to) as the formulator may wish to employ. The concentrate can be made up by dissolving panthenol and the other ingredients in a solvent of conventional type, preferably ethanol. For reasons of economy, it will be obvious to use a denatured alcohol, for example, that known in industry as SDA No. 40 alcohol. Anhydrous solvents can be employed to advantage, especially when corrosion of the container is a problem.

Ordinarily, the quantity of panthenol employed in the concentrate is such as to provide in the finished hair spray formula a content of from about 0.25% to about 10% panthenol, by weight; preferably from about 0.5% to about 1.5%, especially when panthenol is used as substantially the entire film-forming ingredient; and most preferably, about 1% panthenol is employed.

The ratio of concentratezpropellant in the compositions of the invention can be varied over a wide range. Generally, a weight proportion of concentratezpropellant: about 1:2 is preferred, when employing a quantity of panthenol in the concentrate which is within the above stated preferred range of from about 0.5% to about 1.5% by weight of the finished composition.

The compositions of the invention are conveniently packaged in aerosol container-dispensers of the type employed for consumer goods moving through retail channels. Dispensers of the beer can type have been used to advantage, and are referred to in the illustrative examples below; but it should be understood that the invention is not limited to beer can dispensers or even can dispensers, since glass bottles, plastic bottles and other types of container-dispensers can be employed if desired.

Similarly, while it has been convenient to package the compositions of the invention in dispensers by the cold fill method of packaging, and reference is made specifically to this method in the illustrative examples below, the invention is not limited to the particular method of packaging employed. For example, the compositions can be put into dispensers by a.pressure-fill method, if desired.

The use of the compositions of the invention is greatly facilitated by the convenience of the form of aerosol spray package in which these compositions are contained and dispensed. Ordinarily, the user will apply the desired amount of aerosol hair dressing directly from the package to the hair after the hair has been coifed. However, it is not excluded that an individual user may prefer to apply the aerosol hair dressing first, and then coif the hair.

This application is a continuation-in-part of my copending prior application Serial No. 752,175, filed July 31, 1958, now abandoned.

The invention is further disclosed in the following ex- The alcohol was warmed to 60 C., and the other ingredients were added. The whole was mixed until a uniform solution was obtained. The solution was cooled to 5 C. and allowed to stand at this temperature overnight. It then was filtered through a porcelain candle filter (XFF porosity).

A propellant was made by mixing the following ingradients:

G. Freon 11 5,754.51 Freon 12 3,836.34

Subtotal 9,590.85

The concentrate and propellant were then loaded into aerosol container-dispensers. The container-dispenser employed comprised: (a) a conventional aerosol can, 6 oz. capacity, side seam lead soldered outside, round dome top with 1 curled opening, concave bottom, half pound electrolytic tin plate throughout, no internal coating; (12) an assembled cup-type valve (e.g. Model NN, Precision Valve Corporation, Yonkers, New York), including a polyethylene, mechanical break-up press button and a polyethylene dip tube; and (c) a protective dome (e.g. Model 5, Precision Valve Corporation, supra). A suitable form of container-dispenser is that shown diagrammatically in Figure 7 at page 800 of Cosmetics Science and Technology (ed. Edward Sagarin), published by Interscience Publishers, Inc., New York, N. Y., 1957.

The filling method employed was of the cold fill type. The concentrate was cooled to 0 C., and was filled into the aerosol cans, each can being charged with 45.85 g. of concentrate. The propellant, previously cooled to about minus 10 C., was then added to the cans, each can being chargedwith 95.90 g. of propellant. The valves were inserted into the filled cans, and were crimped on. After filling, the cans were tested for compliance with ICC. regulations, and the protective domes were then placed over the valves.

The aerosol hair spray employed in this example had approximately the following percentage composition:

In the same manner indicated in Example 1 above, aerosol hair dressing packages were made up, employing compositions having the kinds and percentages of ingredients indicated in the following examples:

EXAMPLE 2 Concentrate Percent Atlas G263 (35% aqueous solution) 0.14 Lanoge 21 1.00 d-Panthenol 1 .00 Perfume oil 0.30 Anhydrous alcohol, SDA No. 40 29.00

Subtotal 31.44

Finished formula A'bove Concentrate 31.44 Freon 114 60.00 Freon 12 8.56

Total 100.00

EXAMPLE 3 Concentrate Percent Atlas G-263 (35% aqueous solution) 0.05 Ethyl cellulose Tl0 0.37 Lanogel 21 0.74 d-Panthenol 0.91 Perfume oil 0.33 Anhydrous alcohol, SDA No. 40 27.80

Subtotal 30.20

Finished formula 1 Above Concentrate 30.20 Freon 114 61.00 Freon 12 8.80

Total 100.00

EXAMPLE 4 Concentrate Percent Atlas G-2 63 (35% aqueous solution) 0.13 d-Panthenol 1.00 Perfume oil 0.30 Anhydrous alcohol, SDA No. 40 30.01

Subtotal 31.44

Finished formula Above Concentrate 31.44 Freon 114 60.00 Freon 12 8.56

Total L 100.00

EXAMPLE 5 Concentrate Percent d-Panthenol 1.00 Perfume oil 0.30 Anhydrous alcohol, SDA No. 40 30:14

Subtotal 3 1.44

Finished formula Above Concentrate 31.44 Freon 114 60.00 Freon 12 8.56

Total 100.00

EXAMPLE 6 Concentrate Percent Atlas G263" (35% aqueous solution) 0.13 d-Panthenol 0.91 Ethyl cellulose T-10 0.37 Lanogel 31 0.7.3 Perfume oil 0.34 Anhydrous alcohol, SDA No. 40 26.90

Subtotal 29.38

Finished formula Active Concentrate 29.38 Freon 114 61.80 Freon 12 8.82

Total 100.00

EXAMPLE 7 Concentrate Percent Zelec NK 0.14 Lanogel 21 0.50 d-Panthenol 0.50 Perfume oil 0.20 Anhydrous alcohol, SDA No. 40 30.00

Subtotal 3 1.34

Finished formula Above concentrate 31.34 Freon 11 41.20 Freon 12 27.46

Total 100.00

from the group consisting of trichloromonofluoromethane, dichlorodifiuoromethane and symmetrical dichlorotetrafluoroethane.

3. An aerosol hair spray composition comprising (1) a concentrate containing an alcoholic solvent and panthenol dissolved therein in an amount from about 0.5% to about 1.5% by weight of the concentrate and (2) liquefied fluorinated hydrocarbon gas propellant material selected from the group consisting of trichloromonofluoromethane, dichlorodifluoromethane and symmetrical dichlorotetrafluoroethane, the ratio of concentratezpropellant material in said composition being about 1:2.

4. A composition according to claim 3 wherein the panthenol is dl-panthenol.

5. A composition according to claim 3 wherein the panthenol is d-panthenol.

6. A method of setting hair on the human head which comprises applying to the hair an aerosol which contains as the disperse phase panthenol dissolved in an alcoholic solvent as a film-forming ingredient.

7. A method according to claim 6 wherein the panthenol is in dl-form.

8. A method according to claim 7 wherein the hair is coifed before application of the composition.

9. A package comprising a pressure-tight container in the form of a tin plate aerosol can dispenser having a valve-controlled opening and containing a composition for use in producing an aerosol hair spray, said composition consisting essentially of a concentrate containing panthenol, dissolved in an alcoholic solvent, as a filmforming ingredient and a liquefied fluorinated hydrocarbon propellant gas, said composition. being confined in the container under the vapor pressure of the propellant.

10. A package according to claim 9 wherein the panthenol is in dl-form.

11. A liquid composition, for dispensing on the hair under pressure as an aerosol, comprising panthenol in ethanol and liquefied fiuorinated hydrocarbon gas propellant.

12. A package comprising a pressure-tight container in the form of a tin plate aerosol can dispenser having a valve-controlled opening and containing a composition for use in producing an aerosol hair spray, said composition consisting essentially of a concentrate containing panthenol dissolved in ethanol as a film-forming ingredient and a liquefied fluorinated hydrocarbon propellant gas, said composition being confined in the container under the vapor pressure of the propellant.

13. An aerosol hair spray composition comprising (:1) a concentrate containing ethanol and panthenol dissolved therein in an amount from about 0.5 to about 1.5% by Weight of the concentrate and (2) liquefied fiuorinated hydrocarbon gas propellant material selected from the group consisting of trichloromonofluoromethane, dichlorodifluoromethane and symmetrical dichlorotetrafluoroethane, the ratio of concentratezpropellant material in said composition being about 1:2.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,857,314 Phillips Oct. 21, 1958 2,871,161 Spiegel I an. 27, 1959 FOREIGN PATENTS 238,597 Switzerland Nov. 16, 1945 245,907 Switzerland July '16, 1947 253,416 Switzerland Nov. 16, 1948 747,806 Great Britain Apr. 11, 1956 OTHER REFERENCES American Perf. and Aromatics, vol. 71, No. 4, April 1958, p. 10.

(Other references on following page) w a 8 OTHER REFERENCES 'Lebeuf: Soc. de Dermatologie et de Syphiligraphie, 3 V f h L 13 1943 V01. 56, 1949, pp. 76-78. F. tz Zeltschnft fur ltamm orsc ung v0 Dermatological, v01. 91, No. 6, 1945, pp. 310318.

a h N h W h 1 hr? Reed; J.S.C.C., vol. 7, No.2, March 1956, pp. 137-149. N f l l l gii ifi l ff I6 mmsc 6 0c ejsc I L '5 Merck Index, 6th ed., Merck and Co., Rahway, N.J.,

Oesch: Schweizerische Medizinische Wochenschrift, 1952 Jan.5, 1946 (8 pp.).

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2857314 *Jun 7, 1954Oct 21, 1958Hercules Powder Co LtdWater-insoluble ethyl cellulose and plasticizer anhydrous aerosol hair lacquer
US2871161 *Jul 31, 1952Jan 27, 1959Maur IncSprayable water-free alcoholic polyvinylpyrrolidone hair preparation
CH238597A * Title not available
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CH253416A * Title not available
GB747806A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3085116 *Mar 10, 1961Apr 9, 1963Du PontStabilized chlorofluoroalkanes
US3087501 *May 5, 1960Apr 30, 1963Philip F RosmarinEnd wrap impregnated with pantothenyl alcohol
US3087503 *May 5, 1960Apr 30, 1963Philip F RosmarinEnd wrap impregnated with pantothenyl alcohol and hydrolyzed polyacrylic resins
US3144391 *Mar 28, 1960Aug 11, 1964Gillette CoHair-setting composition
US3188275 *Jun 21, 1962Jun 8, 1965Hoffmann La RocheVinyl acetate polyethylene glycol copolymer hair setting composition
US4001392 *Jan 21, 1970Jan 4, 1977Lever Brothers CompanyHairdressings
US4168302 *Mar 30, 1978Sep 18, 1979The Richardson CompanyHair conditioning compositions containing a non-irritating cationic surfactant
US4523080 *Mar 14, 1983Jun 11, 1985Bolton John DApparatus for treatment of hair and scalp
US4861583 *Nov 20, 1987Aug 29, 1989S. C. Johnson & Son, Inc.Hot curling hair treatment
WO1989004653A1 *Feb 1, 1988Jun 1, 1989S.C. Johnson & Son, Inc.Composition and method for hot curling hair treatment
Classifications
U.S. Classification222/192, 424/DIG.200, 424/47, 222/94, 222/394
International ClassificationA61Q5/00, A61K8/04, A61K8/42
Cooperative ClassificationA61Q5/00, Y10S424/02, A61K8/046, A61K8/42
European ClassificationA61K8/42, A61K8/04F, A61Q5/00