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Publication numberUS2983960 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 16, 1961
Filing dateOct 4, 1955
Priority dateApr 4, 1953
Publication numberUS 2983960 A, US 2983960A, US-A-2983960, US2983960 A, US2983960A
InventorsJilge Victor
Original AssigneeKotitzer Ledertuch Und Wachstu, Goppinger Kaliko Und Kunstlede
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Method of making an artificial suede-like body
US 2983960 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

V. JILGE May 16, 1961 METHOD OF MAKING AN ARTIFICIAL SUEDE-LIKE BODY Filed 001". 4, 1955 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 United States Patent O i METHOD OF MAKING AN ARTIFICIAL SUEDE-LIKE BODY Filed Oct. 4, 1955, Ser. No. 538,484

Claims priority, application Germany Apr. 4, 1953 12 Claims. (Cl. 18-48) The present invention relates to an artificial suede-like body and method of making the same, and more particularly to a gas-permeable suede-like body.

The present invention is a continuation-in-part of my copending application, Serial Number 435,375, filed June 8, 1954, entitled Process of Producing Suede-Like Plastic, and now abandoned.

Plastic materials such as polyvinylchloride, natural rubbet, and artificial rubber have for many years been used in the manufacture of artificial leather, i.e., plastic sheets having the appearance and characteristics of leather.

Artificial leather by virtue of its pliability, resistance to wear, insulation properties, resistance to abrasion, and stability even after prolonged use, is suitable for the production of shoes and clothing of all types and all other uses for which leather goods are commonly used.

In order to give artificial leather the outward appearance of natural leather and especially of suede, it is necessary to roughen the surface of the plastic material used as artificial leather. Various methods for roughening the surface of the plastic sheet have been used, however, great difficulties were encountered in roughing the surface of the plastic sheet in such a way that close similarity to suede is achieved.

It has then also been found that a major disadvantage of artificial leathers made of plastic sheets rests in the fact that these sheets are generally impermeable for gases and vapors. A person wearing a piece of clothing apparel made of conventional artificial leather will thus upon prolonged wearing or physical exertion be inconvenienced by the lack of passage of air through the garment and the consequent accumulation of body heat and humidity. In other words, artificial leather-like garments of plastic material do not breathe like woven textile fabrics or natural leather.

It is therefore an object of the present invention to overcome the aforementioned disadvantages of artificial leather-like products.

It is another object of the present invention to provide a product and a process for making the same which has the appearance of suede and which is gas and vaporpermeable.

It is a further object of the present invention to provide a product and a process for making the same which has the appearance of artificial leather, which breathes, and which may be obtained in any desired thickness and strength.

Other objects and advantages of the present invention will be apparent from a further reading of the description and of the appended claims.

With the above objects in view, the present invention mainly consists in an artificial leather-like, gas-permeable, body having the appearance of suede, comprising in combination, a gas-permeable carrier sheet, and firmly adhering to the surface thereof a layer of solid plastic formed with a plurality of gas channels extending from the free surface of the plastic layer to the carrier sheet, the free surface of the plastic layer being roughened.

Patented May 16, 1961 The present invention also consists in a method of producing an artificial leather having the appearance of suede and being gas-permeable, comprising the steps of forming on a support a liquid layer of plastic adapted to be solidified to an artificial leather-like plastic, applying particles of a solid substance insoluble in the plastic and soluble in at least one solvent in which the plastic is not soluble onto the surface of the liquid layer of plastic and retaining the plastic in liquid condition until a portion of the particles penetrates through the liquid layer of plastic and reach the support, solidifying the plastic, removing the solidified plastic from the support, and washing-out the particles of solid substance with a solvent therefor in which the plastic is insoluble, the steps of removing the solidified plastic from the support and washing-out the particles of solid substance being performed in any desired sequence, thereby forming a gas-permeable artificial suede-like leather.

The term plastic as used in the specification and claims is meant to denote those plastic materials which are commonly used in the manufacture of artificial leather and similar products. Many diiferent natural and synthetic resins are utilized for this purpose, all of which are well known in the art. It is therefore apparent that no more definite designation can be given to this group of material than the term plastic and the present invention is not meant to be limited to any specific material utilized according to the present invention, though specific substances will be mentioned by way of illustration.

According to the present invention a gas-permeable artificial leather of suede-like appearance consists of a plastic sheet having minute channels extending through the entire thickness thereof and permitting passage of gas through the sheet. The minute gas channels are formed in accordance with the present invention by applying to a liquid layer of the plastic particles of a solid substance such as small crystals of sodium chloride, which are insoluble in the plastic. By, for instance, dusting the surface of the liquid plastic layer with small salt crystals and keeping the plastic layer in liquid condition, it is achieved that a portion of the salt crystals penetrates deep into the liquid layer and also reaches the supported lower surface of the same. It is desirable that the solid particles have a size smaller than the thickness of the liquid layer so that a plurality of individal particles penctrating through the liquid layer will form at random bodies of superimposed solid particles extending from the free surface of the liquid layer to the supported surface thereof. Other particles will not penetrate deeply into the layer, partly because they are supported by particles which have more deeply penetrated the plastic layer and partly because they were applied later and the liquid layer started to be solidified before these particles had time to deeply penetrate. These other particles will remain partially embedded in the free surface of the plastic layer. After the solid particles are distributed in the liquid plastic layer as described above, the liquid layer with the particles embedded therein, is solidified. The particles are then removed from the solidified plastic layer by washing out with a solvent in which the particles are soluble and in which the plastic layer is insoluble. Preferably, watersoluble solid particles and a plastic which is not soluble in water are used. After thus removing the solid particles from the solidified plastic layer the same will possess gas channels extending throughout its thickness. These channels will be located where previously had been a plurality of solid particles abutting on each other and extending throughout the entire thickness of the plastic layer. Furthermore, the free surface of the plastic layer will appear roughened because of the great number of small cavities formed in the surface portion by washingout the solid particles which were previously embedded in the surface.

Preferably, the plastic layer is formed on, and remains firmly adhering to a gas-permeable carrier sheet such as a sheet of textile fabric, felt, fiber fleece, paper or the like. It is however also within the scope of the present invention to form the suede-like plastic layer on a support from which it is thereafter removed.

It is also within the scope of the present invention to interpose an intermediate gas-permeable layer between a gas-permeable carrier layer and the plastic surface layer having the appearance of suede. This intermediate layer may be formed and adhered to the carrier layer in various ways. It may for instance comprise a plastic layer which has been made gas-permeable by stretching, perforating, the use of gas-forming chemicals and the like.

The novel features which are considered as characteristic for the invention are set forth in particular in the appended claims. The invention itself, however, both as to its construction and its method of operation, together with additional objects and advantages thereof, will be best understood from the following description of specific embodiments when read in connection with the accompanying drawings, in which:

Fig. 1 is a schematic cross-sectional view of the product of the present invention with the particles of solid substance still embedded therein;

Fig. 2 is a schematic cross-sectional view of an embodiment of the product of the present invention;

Fig. 3 is a schematic cross-sectional view of another embodiment of the product of the present invention;

Fig. 4 is a schematic cross-sectional view of still another embodiment of the product of the present invention;

Fig. 5 is a schematic cross-sectional view of a further embodiment of the product of the present invention; and

Fig. 6 is yet another schematic cross-sectional view of the product of the present invention.

Referring now to the drawings and particularly to Fig. 1, a plastic layer 1 is shown on a carrier layer or support 2. Small particles 3 such as crystals of a solid substance which is soluble in a solvent in which plastic layer 1 and support 2 are insoluble, have been dusted onto the surface of plastic layer 1 while the same was in liquid state, and have penetrated through plastic layer 1 so as to form channels throughout the entire thickness of plastic layer 1, which channels are filled with the solid particles 3. Other solid particles 3 which are shown to cover the entire free surface of plastic layer 1 have roughened the free surface of the plastic layer while the same was still in liquid state.

The crystals or other solid particles 3 preferably have a diameter of between 0.05 millimeter and 0.35 millimeter, while the thickness of the plastic layer 1 is preferably between 0.2 and 1 millimeter. Preferably the diameter of the solid particles 3 is smaller than the thickness of plastic layer 1.

While the dimensions indicated above have been found to give excellent results, the present invention is in no way limited to these dimensions since, depending on the intended use of the product, the thickness of the plastic layer and consequently also the size of the solid particles may vary over a considerably broader range. However, as stated above, the relative size of the solid particles in relation to the plastic layer is to be such that the salt crystals or the like are to be smaller than the thickness of the plastic layer so that a chain of superimposed crystals may be formed in the plastic layer, such as is illustrated in Fig. 1. For instance, when using polyvinylchloride to form a plastic layer having a thickness of 0.4 millimeter, sodium chloride crystals having an edge length of between 0.15 and 0.27 millimeter may be used as solid particles.

The application of the solid particles to the liquid plastic layer, for instance by dusting sodium chloride crystals onto a liquid layer of polyvinyl chloride is to be continued until the crystals which have first been dusted upon the plastic layer have penetrated through the same and reached the carrier sheet or support. Subsequently the liquid plastic layer is to be solidified. If the liquid plastic layer consists of polyvinylchloride, this can be achieved by heating. If other substances are used for forming the liquid plastic layer, other suitable measures may be taken to solidify the layer, such as evaporating a solvent which kept the layer in liquid state, or a chemical reaction adapted to solidify the liquid layer, or a suitable combination of these steps.

After solidification of the plastic layer, the solid particles are washed out with a solvent in which the plastic layer is not soluble, for instance water if sodium chloride crystals are to be removed from a layer of polyvinylchloride. The resulting product is shown in Fig. 2. The plastic layer 1 has a roughened surface and is formed with a plurality of gas channels which extend throughout the plastic layer 1 to the gas-permeable carrier sheet 2.

The embodiment illustrated in Fig. 3 shows on a gaspermeable carrier sheet 2 an intermediate plastic layer 4 which has been made gas-permeable by activating a gasforming chemical therein, in a way similar to a leavening process. Plastic layer 1 having a suede-like surface and formed as has been described in detail above, is superimposed upon intermediate layer 4. Any desired thickness and strength of the artificial leather-like body illustrated in Fig. 3 can be obtained by choosing the proper material for intermediate layer 4, applying it in the desired thickness, and, if desired forming a plurality of intermediate layers. As clearly shown in Fig. 3, some of the channels formed in plastic layer 1 communicate with channels extending through the entire thickness of intermediate layer 4, and these channels in intermediate layer 4 again communicate with the gas-permeable carrier sheet 2, thus making the entire laminated body gas-permeable. Not all of the channels formed in intermediate layer 4 extend through the entire thickness thereof. The distribution and diameter of the channels extending throughout intermediate layer 4 can be controlled by the type, quantity and reaction conditions of the gas-forming substance therein and thereby the porosity and gas permeability of the entire body can be adjusted as desired. Instead of using gas-forming chemicals in a plastic substance, the intermediate layer 4 can also be made by applying and forming a foam plastic on the carrier sheet.

The embodiment illustrated in Fig. 4 shows superimposed on the carrier sheet 2 an intermediate layer 4 which has been made gas-permeable by perforation. Suedelike plastic layer 1 has then been formed on intermediate layer 4 as described above relative to Figs. 1 and 2. Again some of the gas channels formed in suede-like plastic layer 1 communicate with some of the perforations in intermediate layer 4, and these perforations communicate with gas-permeable portions of carrier sheet 2, thus making the entire artificial leather-like laminated body gaspermeable.

According to the embodiment of the present invention which is shown in Fig. 5, the intermediate layer 4 has been made gas-permeable by stretching. Communicating channels in the suede-like plastic layer 1, the intermediate layer 4 and the carrier sheet 2 provide gas permeability of the entire body.

Fig. 6 illustrates a preferred embodiment of the present invention wherein the carrier layer consists of a textile sheet comprising interwoven threads 5, 6. The major portion of a surface of the textile sheet is covered with an intermediate layer of flexible plastic material 7. However, portions 8 of the textile sheet extend outwardly beyond the surface of the intermediate layer 7. The intermediate layer 7 is preferably applied in liquid form to the textile sheet representing the carrier layer. It may then cover the entire surface of the carrier layer. While the intermediate layer is still in liquid form, the outer portion of the same is scratched-01f, thereby exposing the outwardly extending portions of the textile sheet 8. Intermediate layer 7 is then solidified. The threads of the textile sheet are gas-permeable, while plastic layer 7 may not permit the passage of gas. Since portions 8 of the textile sheet are not covered by the intermediate layer 7 it is possible for gas to permeate through the textile sheet. Suede-like plastic layer 1 is superimposed upon the outer surface of intermediate layer 7 and the outer surface of the upper portions 8 of the textile sheet. Some of the channels formed in plastic layer 1 communicate with the gas-permeable outer portions 8 of the textile sheet, thus making the entire body gas-permeable.

So far only polyvinylchloride has been referred to as material for the solidifiable plastic layer 1 which gives the final product of the present invention a suede-like appearance. However, as previously stated the present invention is not limited to any specific type of plastic material. Similarly the intermediate layer or layers 4 may consist of any suitable plastic material. For instance, intermediate layers of polycondensation products formed from polyesters of dior tri-isocyanates containing small quantities of water may be formed on a carrier layer or support. During the reaction of the polycondensation product, carbon dioxide is given-01f and thus an intermediary gas-permeable plastic foam layer is formed. The degree of porosity can be controlled by the relative amount of water in the reactants. To other plastic materials such as butadiene polymers or polycondensate products of natural rubber, preferably substances are added which upon heating form a gas; As gas-forming substances, for instance ammoniumor alkali-carbonates may be employed. Depending on the desired qualities of the finished artificial leather-like, gas-permeable, coated body of the present invention a varying number of gas-permeable intermediate layers may be formed. The surface layer is then applied to the carrier sheet or to the uppermost intermediate layer in liquid form and is made water-permeable by applying thereto particles of a solid substance, solidifying the plastic layer and washing-out the solid particles thereby forming gas-permeable channels through the surface layer and also giving its surface a suede-like roughened appearance, as has been described in detail further above.

In order to permit penetration of the liquid surface layer by the solid particles, it is of course necessary that under the conditions of execution of the process the specific gravity of the liquid surface layer is less than the specific gravity of the solid particles.

Itis within the scope of the present invention to treat the suede-like laminated body with a hydrophobic agent such as a parafiin solution or parafiin emulsion in order to make the coated body impervious to water, or waterrepellent, while maintaining its gas permeability.

The following examples are given as illustrative only, the scope of the invention however not being limited to the specific examples.

Example 1 A textile fabric dyed in the desired color and having a weight of about 200 grams per square meter is coated with a plasticizer and pigment-containing polyvinylchloride paste composed of 100 parts of polyvinylchloride, 75 parts of dioctylphthalate and 10 parts of coloring pigments. 300 grams of this paste are used for coating 1 square meter of the textile fabric. The thus obtained coating has a thickness of 0.2-0.3 millimeter. While this layer is still in liquid state about 500 grams of sodium chloride crystals having an approximate edge length of 0.15-0.27 millimeter are evenly dusted on each square meter of the coating by means of a fine-mesh sieve. The textile fabric is moved horizontally during this process over rollers at such a speed that about 2 minutes are available for a portion of the sodium chloride crystals to penetrate through the liquid layer of the coating and to reach the surface of the underlying textile fabric. Thereafter the coated fabric passes through a heating channel in which it is kept for about 4 minutes at a temperature of about 165 C. The thus-formed coated sheet is then cooled by being conducted around a watercooled drum, and then wound-up. The sodium chloride is thereafter washed-out in a dyeing jigger through which the coated body passes under continuous renewal of washwater of about C., for the length of time required for completely washing-out the sodium chloride, that is until the spent wash water is found to be free of sodium chloride. The thus produced artificial leather-like body is then dried at about C. and thereafter, if desired, buffed with emery rollers.

The thus-obtained artificial leather of suede like appearance has an air permeability coefiicient of about 450 as measured with the apparatus according to Professor Bergrnann.

Example 2 A textile fabric dyed in the desired color having a weight of about 200 grams per square meter is coated with a plasticizer and pigment-containing polyvinylchloride paste comprising 100 parts of polyvinylchloride, 75 parts of dioctylphthalate and 10 parts of iron oxide red. About 100 grams are used for coating 1 square meter and a coating having a thickness of about 0.07 millimeter is thus formed. The coated fabric then passes with a speed of about 6 meters per minute through a heating channel having a length of about 9 meters and being heated at C. After leaving the heating channel, the coated fabric is cooled over a water-cooled drum and wound-up. Subsequently the coated fabric passes through a perforating machine in which holes of 0.5 millimeter diameter are stamped into the coated fabric. The distribution of holes is such that per square centimeter of the coated fabric 9 holes are made. The coated fabric which has thus been made gas-permeable is then coated on top of the previously formed coated layer with 300 grams per square meter of the above-described polyvinylchloride paste and thereby a second coated layerv having a thickness of 0.2 0.3 millimeter is formed. While this second coated layer is still in liquid state, sodium chloride crystals are dusted onto it, similarly as described in Example 1. After allowing 2 minutes for the sodium chloride crystals to penetrate in part through the still liquid second coated layer and to reach the surface of the solid, perforated coated layer, the coated sheet is heated for 4 minutes to C. in a heating channel and thereby the second coating layer is solidified. The coated sheet is then cooled, the sodium chloride is washed out, the thus formed gas-permeable coated artificial leather of suedelike appearance is dried and, if desired, buffed as described in more detail in Example 1.

It will be understood that each of the elements described above, or two or more together, may also find a useful application in other types of coated bodies differing from the types described above.

While the invention has been illustrated and described as embodied in an artificial leather-like gas-permeable coated body having the appearance of suede, it is not intended to be limited to the details shown, since various modifications and structural changes may be made without departing in any way from the spirit of the present invention.

Without further analysis, the foregoing will so fully reveal the gist of the present invention that others can by applying current knowledge readily adapt it for various applications without omitting features that, from the standpoint of prior art, fairly constitute essential characteristics of the generic or specific aspects of this invention and, therefore, such adaptations should and are intended to be comprehended within the meaning and rang of equivalence of the following claims. a

What is claimed as new and desired to be secured by Letters Patent is:

1. A method of producing an artificial leather having the appearance of suede and being gas-permeable, comprising the steps of forming on the surface of a gaspermeable carrier sheet a liquid layer of predetermined thickness of a homogeneous plastic adapted to be solidified to an artificial leather-like plastic; dusting particles of a solid substance having a largest diameter smaller than said predetermined thickness and being insoluble in said plastic and soluble in at least one solvent in which said plastic is not soluble onto the surface of said liquid layer of plastic, said dusting being continued and said plastic being retained in liquid condition until the dusted particles cover the entire free surface of said liquid layer and until the particles which have first been dusted upon said layer have penetrated through the same and have reached said carrier sheet so that some of said particles form within said liquid layer continuous columns extending through the entire thickness of said layer; solidifying said plastic; and washing out said particles of solid substances from the surface and from within said layer of solidified plastic with a solvent therefor in which said plastic is insoluble, thereby forming a gas-permeable artificial suede-like leather.

2. A method of producing an artificial leather having the appearance of suede and being gas-permeable, comprising the steps of forming on the surface of a gaspermeable carrier sheet a liquid layer of predetermined thickness of a homogeneous plastic adapted to be solidified to an artificial leather-like plastic; dusting crystals having a largest diameter smaller than said predetermined thickness and being insoluble in said plastic and soluble in at least one solvent in which said plastic is not soluble onto the surface of said liquid layer of plastic, said dusting being continued and said plastic being retained in liquid condition until the dusted crystals cover the entire free surface of said liquid layer and until the crystals which have first been dusted upon said layer have penetrated through the same and have reached said carrier sheet so that some of said crystals form within said liquid layer continuous columns extending through the entire thickness of said layer; solidifying said plastic; and washing out said crystals from the surface and from within said layer of solidified plastic with a solvent therefor in which said plastic is insoluble, thereby forming a gas-permeable artificial suede-like leather.

3. A method of producing an artificial leather having the appearance of suede and being gas-permeable, comprising the steps of forming on the surface of a gaspermeable carrier sheet a liquid layer of predetermined thickness of a homogeneous plastic adapted to be solidified to an artificial leather-like plastic and being insoluble in water; dusting particles of sodium chloride having a largest diameter smaller than said predetermined thickness onto the surface of said liquid layer of plastic, said dusting being continued and said plastic being retained in liquid condition until the dusted sodium chloride particles cover the entire free surface of said liquid layer and until the sodium chloride particles which have first been dusted upon said layer have penetrated through the same and have reached said carrier sheet so that some of said sodium chloride particles form within said liquid layer continuous columns extending through the entire thickness of said layer; solidifying said plastic; and washing out said particles of sodium chloride with water from the surface and from within said layer of solidified plastic, thereby forming a gas-permeable artificial suede-like leather.

4. A method of producing an artificial leather having the appearance of suede and being gas-permeable, comprising the steps of forming on the surface of a gaspermeable carrier sheet a liquid polyvinylchloride layer of predetermined thickness, dusting particles of sodium chloride having a largest diameter smaller than said predetermined thickness onto the surface of said liquid layer of polyvinylchloride, said dusting being continued and said plastic being retained in liquid condition until the dusted sodium chloride particles cover the entire free surface of said liquid layer and until the sodium chloride particles which have first been dusted upon said layer have penetrated through the same and have reached said carrier sheet so that some of said sodium chloride particles form within said liquid layer continuous columns extending through the entire thickness of said layer; solidifying said polyvinylchloride; and washing out said particles of sodium chloride with water from the surface and from within said layer of solidified plastic, thereby forming a gas-permeable artificial suede-like leather.

5. A method of producing an artificial leather having the appearance of suede and being gas-permeable, comprising the steps of forming on the surface of a gaspermeable carrier sheet a liquid layer having a thickness of approximately between 0.2 millimeter and 1 millimeter of a homogeneous plastic adapted to be solidified to an artificial leather-like plastic; dusting particles of a solid substance having a diameter smaller than the thickness of said liquid layer and being between 0.05 millimeter and 0.35 millimeter, said particles being insoluble in said plastic and soluble in at least one solvent in which said plastic is not soluble onto the surface of said liquid layer of plastic, said dusting being continued and said plastic being retained in liquid condition until the dusted particles cover the entire free surface of said liquid layer and until the particles which have first been dusted upon said layer have penetrated through the same and have reached said carrier sheet so that some of said particles form within said liquid layer continuous columns extending through the entire thickness of said layer; solidifying said plastic; and washing out said particles of solid substance with a solvent therefor in which said plastic is insoluble from the surface and from within said layer of solidified plastic, thereby forming a gas-permeable artificial suede-like leather.

6. A method of producing an artificial leather having the appearance of suede and being gas-permeable, comprising the steps of forming on the surface of a gaspermeable carrier sheet a liquid layer having a thickness of about between 0.2 millimeter and l millimeter of a homogeneous plastic adapted to be solidified to an artificial leather-like plastic and being insoluble in Water; dusting sodium chloride crystals having an edge length of between 0.15 and 0.27 millimeter and being insoluble in said plastic onto the surface of said liquid layer of plastic, said dusting being continued and said plastic being retained in liquid condition until the dusted sodium chloride particles cover the entire free surface of said liquid layer and until the sodium chloride particles which have first been dusted upon said layer have penetrated through the same and have reached said carrier sheet so that some of said sodium chloride particles form within said liquid layer continuous columns extending through the entire thickness of said layer; solidifying said plastic; and washing out said sodium chloride crystals with water from the surface and from within said layer of solidified plastic, thereby forming a gas-permeable artificial suedelike leather.

7. A method of producing an artificial leather having the appearance of suede and being gas-permeable, comprising the steps of forming on the surface of a gaspermeable carrier sheet an intermediate layer of a gaspermeable flexible material; forming on the free surface of said intermediate layer a liquid layer of predetermined thickness of a homogeneous plastic adapted to be solidified to an artificial leather-like plastic; dusting particles of a solid substance having a largest diameter smaller than said predetermined thickness and being insoluble in said plastic and soluble in at least one solvent in which said plastic is not soluble onto the surface of said liquid layer of plastic, said dusting being continued and said. plastic being retained in liquid condition until the dusted particles cover the entire free surface of said liquid layer and until the particles which have first been dusted upon said layer have penetrated through the same and have reached said carrier sheet so that some of said particles form within said liquid layer continuous columns extending through the entire thickness of said layer; solidifying said plastic; and washing out said particles of solidsubstance with a solvent therefor in which said plastic is insoluble from the surface and from within said layer of solidified plastic, thereby forming a gas-permeable artificial suede-like leather.

8. A method of producing an artificial leather having the appearance of suede and being gas permeable, comprising the steps of forming on at least one side of a textile sheet consisting of gas-permeable interwoven threads and having portions defining an outermost surface of said sheet an intermediate layer of flexible material having an outer surface located inwardly of said outermost surface of said textile sheet so that portions of said threads project outwardly from said intermediate layer; forming on the free surface of said outwardly projecting thread portions and of said intermediate layer a liquid layer of predetermined thickness of a homogeneous plastic adapted to be solidified to an artificial leather-like plastic; dusting particles of a solid substance having a largest diameter smaller than said predetermined thickness and being insoluble in said plastic and soluble in at least one solvent in which said plastic is not soluble onto the surface of said liquid layer of plastic, said dusting being continued and said plastic being retained in liquid condition until the dusted particles cover the entire free surface of said liquid layer and until the particles which have first been dusted upon said layer have penetrated through the same and have reached said carrier sheet so that some of said particles form within said liquid layer continuous columns extending through the entire thickness of said layer; solidifying said plastic; and washing out said particles of solid substance with a solvent therefor in which said plastic is insoluble from the surface and from within said layer of solidified plastic, thereby forming a gas-permeable artificial suede-like leather.

9. A method of producing an artificial leather having the appearance of suede and being gas-permeable, comprising the steps of forming on at least one side of a textile sheet consisting of gas-permeable interwoven threads and having portions defining an outermost surface of said sheet a continuous liquid intermediate layer of flexible material adapted to be solidified and having a free surface located outwardly of said outermost surface; removing the free surface portion of said liquid intermediate layer thereby forming a new outer surface of said liquid intermediate layer located inwardly of said outermost surface of said textile sheet so that portions of said threads project outwardly from said intermediate layer; solidifying said intermediate layer; forming on the free surface of said outwardly projecting thread portions and of said intermediate layer a liquid layer of predetermined thickness of a homogeneous plastic adapted to be solidified to an artificial leatherlike plastic; dusting particles of a solid substance having a largest diameter smaller than said predetermined thickness and being insoluble in said plastic and soluble in at least one solvent in which said plastic is not soluble onto the surface of said liquid layer of plastic, said dusting being continued and said plastic being retained in liquid condition until the dusted particles cover the entire free surface of said liquid layer and until ,the particles which have first been dusted upon said layer have penetrated through the same and have reached said carrier sheet so that some of said particles form within said liquid layer continuous columns extending through the entire thickness of said layer; solidifying said plastic; and washl0 7 ing out saidparticles of solid substance with a solvent therefor in which said plastic is insoluble from the surface and from within said layer of solidified plastic, thereby forming a gas-permeable artificial suede-like leather.

10. A method of producing an artificial leather having the appearance of suede and being gas-permeable, comprising the steps of forming on a support a liquid layer of predetermined thickness of a homogeneous plastic adapted to be solidified to an artificial leather-like plastic; dusting particles of a solid substance having a largest diameter smaller than said predetermined thickness and being insoluble in said plastic and soluble in at least one solvent in which said plastic is not soluble onto the surface of said liquid layer of plastic, said dusting being continued and said plastic being retained in liquid condition until the dusted particles cover the entire free surface of said liquid layer and until the particles which have first been dusted upon said layer have penetrated through the same and have reached said carrier sheet so that some of said particles form within said liquid layer continuous columns extending through the entire thickness of said layer; solidifying said plastic; removing said solidified plastic from said support; and washing out said particles of solid substance with a solvent therefor in which said plastic is insoluble from the surface and from within said layer of solidified plastic, said steps of removing the solidified plastic from said support and washing-out the particles of solid substance being performed in any desired sequence, thereby forming a gaspermeable artificial suede-like leather.

11. A method of producing an artificial leather having the appearance of suede and being gas-permeable, comprising the steps of forming on a support a liquid layer of predetermined thicknesses of a homogeneous plastic adapted to be solidified to an artificial leather-like plastic; dusting particles of a solid substance having a largest diameter smaller than said predetermined thickness and being insoluble in said plastic and soluble in at least one solvent in which said plastic is not soluble onto the surface of said liquid layer of plastic, said dusting being continued and said plastic being retained in liquid condition until the dusted particles cover the entire free surface of said liquid layer and until the particles which have first been dusted upon said layer have penetrated through the same and have reached said carrier sheet so that some of said particles formwithin said liquid layer continuous columns extending through the entire thickness of said layer; solidifying said plastic; removing said solidified plastic from said support; washing-out said particles of solid substance with a solvent therefor in which said plastic is insoluble from the surface and from,

within said layer of solidified plastic, said steps of removing the solidified plastic from said support and washing-out the particles of solid substance being performed in any desired sequence, thereby forming a gas-permeable artificial suede-like leather having a roughened surface; and buifing said roughened surface of said artificial leather so as to partially smoothen the surface thereof.

12. A method of producing an artificial leather having the appearance of suede and being gas-permeable, comprising the steps of forming on the surface of a gaspermeable carrier sheet a liquid layer of predetermined thickness of a homogeneous plastic adapted to be solidified to an antificial leather-like plastic; dusting particles of a solid substance having a largest diameter smaller than said predetermined thickness and being insoluble in said plastic and soluble in at least one solvent in which said plastic is not soluble onto the the surface of said liquid layer of plastic, said dusting being continued and said plastic being retained in liquid condition until the dusted particles cover the entire free surface of said liquid layer and until the particles which have first been dusted upon said layer have penetrated through the same and have reached said carrier sheet so that some of said particles form within said liquid layer continuous columnsextending through the entire thickness of said layer; solidifying said plastic; Washing out said particles of solid substance with a solvent therefor in which said plastic is insoluble from the surface and from within said layer of solidified plastic, thereby forming a gas-permeable artificial suedelike leather; and treating said artificial leather with a hydrophobic agent 50 as to make it water-repellent.

12 Rodman Aug. 22, 1944 Nadeau et al Oct. 9, 1945 Snow July 29, 1947 Snow et al Oct. 11, 1949 Guillot July 24, 1951 Weltman et a1 Dec. 22, 1953 Francis Jan. 11, 1955 Ellis Jan. 3, 1956 Schramm Feb. 21, 1956 Sarbach Mar. 11, 1958 Segner May 20, 1958

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Classifications
U.S. Classification264/48, 428/904, 156/87, 156/77, 264/49, 156/155, 264/321, 264/293, 427/353
International ClassificationD06N3/00
Cooperative ClassificationD06N3/0075, Y10S428/904
European ClassificationD06N3/00F4