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Publication numberUS2984905 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 23, 1961
Filing dateMar 23, 1959
Priority dateMar 23, 1959
Publication numberUS 2984905 A, US 2984905A, US-A-2984905, US2984905 A, US2984905A
InventorsHarry Harmon Cline
Original AssigneeWaterloo Foundry Co Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Cable sheath stripping tool
US 2984905 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

Magg -2 3, 1961 I c. H. HARMON 2,984,905 CABLE SHEATH STRIPPING TOOL Filed March 23, 1959 INVEN 70/? ATTORNEYS.

Patented May 23, 1961 CABLE SHEATH STRIPPING TOOL Cline Harry Harmon, Waterloo, Iowa, assignor to WaterlgoI Foundry Co., Inc., Waterloo, Iowa, a corporation owa Filed Mar. 23, 1959, Ser. No. 801,217

2 Claims. (CI. 30-94) This invention relates to a cable sheath stripping tool, and more particularly to a stripping tool of the portable type.

Tools of this general class are utilized for removing the terminal portion of the sheath of an electric cable to expose a terminal portion of the conductor so as to permit attachment of the latter to an electrical terminal or connector.

One of the objects of this invention is to provide a novel tool of the character indicated which is of a portable nature, and constructed and arranged so as to permit its use in a shop, garage, or in the field.

Another object is to provide a novel tool of the character indicated which is dimensioned and formed for convenient gripping in the hand so as to first permit severing of a terminal portion of the cable sheath, and then stripping the severed terminal portion of the sheath off of the conductor.

A further object is to provide a novel tool of the character indicated which is simple in construction, eflicient in use, and which is capable of being economically manufactured.

Other objects and advantages of this invention will be apparent from the following description taken in connection with the accompanying drawing, in which:

Figure 1 is a perspective view of the tool embodying the present invention, shown positioned with respect to an end portion of an electrical cable in the process of severing a terminal portion of the sheath of the cable.

Figure 2 is a perspective view of the tool in a position for stripping a severed terminal portion of the sheath oil of the conductor of the cable.

Figure 3 is a side elevational view of the tool showing the cutting or severing means of the tool.

Figure 4 is a view of the opposite side of the tool showing the means for shipping of the severed portion of sheath from the cable.

Figure 5 is a view of the tool and a cable, shown partially in section, with the tool in process of severing the terminal portion of the sheath of the cable.

Figure 6 is a side view, showing the tool and cable partially in section, in process of stripping the severed terminal portion of the sheath off of the conductor of the cable.

Figures 7 and 8 are opposite end views of the tool.

The tool embodying the present invention comprises an elongated body 10, shaped and dimensioned for gripping by the hand. As may be seen in the drawings, the body is somewhat flattened in cross-section and one of the edges is shaped or contoured, as indicated at 11, so as to constitute seats for the fingers to provide a substantial hand grip. Preferably, the body is a molded piece, formed of metal, such as aluminum, or any other suitable relatively rigid material.

One of the sides of the body is formed with a longitudinally extending recess 14, of generally semi-circular cross-section, and extending to an opening at one end of the body, as seen in Figures 1, 3, 5 and 7 of the drawing. Said recess serves to provide a seat and support for a predetermined length of a terminal portion of the cable, as indicated at 15, comprising an outer jacket or sheath 16, and a core or conductor 17. It is to be understood that the length of the longitudinal recess 14 should correspond to the length of the terminal portion of the sheath to be stripped from the cable. Connected to said end of the body 10, as may be seen in Figures 1, 3, 5 and 7 of the drawing, is a cutter blade 18, fixedly secured in position on the end of said body by three screws 19. The cutter blade is preferably, though not necessarily, a conventional, inexpensive, safety razor blade, and is mounted so that the cutting edge is positioned above the bottom of the recess 14 a distance approximately equal to the thickness of the sheath 16 of the cable, as may be clearly seen in Figure 5 of the drawing.

The opposite side of the body 10 is provided with a second longitudinally extending recess 22, which likewise is of generally semi-circular cross-section, and which extends to and opens at the opposite end of said body. Extending through the wall of the body, opposite the recess 22, is a projection, herein indicated as the terminal portion of a screw 24, which is threaded through said body, with the terminal portion extending into the recess a distance equal to approximately the thickness of the sheath of the cable. The screw 24 is so located with respect to the length of the recess 22, so as to assure accommodating the terminal portion of the cable within the recess, inwardly of the screw 24, to an extent at least equal to the length of the sheath portion to be stripped from the conductor.

In the use of the tool, it is first placed in the hand and firmly gripped, and the cable 15 is then seated in the recess 14, with the end thereof abutting the end wall 14a of said recess, and pressure is applied to the terminal portion of the cable in the direction of the cutting edge of the blade 18, and the tool and cable are then rotated relative to each other in a manner such as illustrated in Figure 1 of the drawing, so as to sever a terminal portion, as indicated at 16a, of the sheath of the cable. After the sheath has been severed all around by the cutter blade 18, the tool is removed from the cable and reversed end for end, and is positioned on the cable so that the terminal portion of the screw 24 extends into the cut formed in the sheath, abutting against the inner end of the severed terminal sheath portion 16a. By the application of pressure upon said severed portion of the sheath, in the direction of the screw 24, and by applying a pulling force in opposite directions on the hand grip and the cable, said terminal portion 16a of the sheath becomes stripped off the cable so as to expose the terminal portion of the conductor 17 of the cable, as seen in Figures 2 and 6 of the drawing.

A tool of the type embodying the present invention has numerous uses and is especially suitable for use vwhere it is desired to make up sheathed electrical cables of various desired lengths for attachment to terminals or connectors. For example, an assembly of cables and connectors of desired size and length of cable may be made up for use in connection with batteries, such as storage batteries for various types of power driven vehicles.

Although I have herein shown and described a certain preferred embodiment of my invention, manifestly it is capable of further modification and rearrangement without departing from the spirit and scope thereof. 1 do not, therefore, wish to be understood as limiting this invention to the precise embodiment herein disclosed, except as I may be so limited by the appended claims.

What I claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent of the United States is:

1. A cable sheath stripping tool comprising an elongated body for gripping by the hand, said body having a longitudinally extending outwardly open recess in open communication at one end with one end of the body for receiving and providing supportfor a terminal portionofa sheathed cable, the opposite end of the recess being formedto constitute a stop against which the end of the cable is adapted to abut, and a, cutter blade secured to said one end of the body with its cutting edge extending across the recess, for circumferentially cutting the terminal portion of cable sheath transversely a predetermined distance from the end thereof.

2. A cable. sheath stripping tool comprising an elongated body for gripping by the hand, said body having a longitudinally. extending outwardly open recess in open communication at one end with one end of the body for receiving and providing support for a, terminal portion of a sheathedv cable, the opposite end of the recess being formed to constitute a stop against which the end of the cable is adapted to abut, and a cutter blade secured to said one end of the body with its cutting edge extending across the recess, for circumferentially cutting the terminal portion of cable sheath and disposed above the boti .....i.,. v "a, V

4 tom of the recess a distance approximately equal to the thickness of the sheath of the cable to be stripped, whereby the sheath is caused to be severed in a transverse plane a predetermined distance from the end of the cable.

References Citedvin the file, of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,725,114. Van Gelderen Aug. 20, 1929 2,292,729 Woodward Aug. 11, 1942 2,306,403 Moltensen Dec. 29, 1942 2,386,327 Martin Oct. 9, 1945 2,468,122 Shepard Apr. 26, 1949 2,795,982 Mathias June 18, 1957 2,819,520 Eyles Jan. 14, 1958 2,848,914 Gottfried, Aug. 26, 1958 FOREIGN PATENTS 521,433 Great Britain May 21, 1940 529,066 Great Britain Nov. 13, 1940 554,637 Great Britain July 13, 1943

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1725114 *Nov 4, 1927Aug 20, 1929Gelderen Frederik Marinus VanWire stripper
US2292729 *Jan 2, 1941Aug 11, 1942Woodward Sterling CCutting device
US2306403 *Jun 7, 1941Dec 29, 1942North Bros Mfg CoStripping device
US2386327 *Mar 27, 1943Oct 9, 1945Western Electric CoInsulation stripping pliers
US2468122 *Mar 12, 1945Apr 26, 1949Shepard Chester CWire stripper
US2795982 *Apr 28, 1955Jun 18, 1957Arnold MathiasWire stripping tool
US2819520 *May 11, 1956Jan 14, 1958Eyles Edward GNon-metallic cable slitter
US2848914 *Mar 7, 1955Aug 26, 1958Shalom GottfriedWire stripping device
GB521433A * Title not available
GB529066A * Title not available
GB554637A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3092906 *Jul 17, 1961Jun 11, 1963Deering Lawrence ETool for stripping insulation from wire or cable
US3237300 *Mar 25, 1963Mar 1, 1966Dorothy Townsend MaryInsulation cutting pliers having parallel longitudinal and transverse cutting edges
US3304605 *Jun 29, 1965Feb 21, 1967Amp IncCable stripping device
US3878606 *Mar 19, 1974Apr 22, 1975Mc Donnell Douglas CorpCable gage and cutter guide tool
US4409713 *Sep 18, 1980Oct 18, 1983Akzona IncorporatedElectrical connector application tool
US4594921 *Aug 9, 1985Jun 17, 1986The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of The ArmyCable stripping apparatus
US4877924 *Nov 21, 1988Oct 31, 1989Harry MitzmacherElectric wire connector with built-in stripper and strip gauge
US5074043 *Nov 26, 1990Dec 24, 1991Mills Edward OSafety-cable jacket remover
Classifications
U.S. Classification30/90.1, 439/415, 30/90.8
International ClassificationH02G1/12
Cooperative ClassificationH02G1/1224
European ClassificationH02G1/12B2C2