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Publication numberUS2984921 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 23, 1961
Filing dateApr 24, 1959
Priority dateApr 24, 1959
Publication numberUS 2984921 A, US 2984921A, US-A-2984921, US2984921 A, US2984921A
InventorsLeonard A Herzig
Original AssigneeP C I Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Microfilm record card
US 2984921 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

May 23, 1951 I L. A. HERzlG 2,984,921

MICROFILM RECORD CARD Filed April 24, 1959 U IIIIDBU lll lll l! f'q 1 /s il 'L 5 ,4 frog/wry MICROFILM RECORD CARD Leonard A. Herzig, Malba, N.Y., assigner to P.C.I. In-

corporated, Long Island City, N.Y., a corporation of Delaware Filed Apr. 24, 1959, Ser. N0. 808,6711

5 Claims. (Cl. 40-158) This invention relates to record cards of the type which are usually punched or perforated according to a predetermined code for use in standard electrical card sorting, cataloguing and classifying systems, and it has for its object to provide a novel and improved card of this type for use in cataloguing or classifying microfilm, motion picture film or the like.

Another object of the invention s to provide a simple and efficient method of affixing films to cards of the above type without distorting the photographic image and at the same time actually' increasing the strength and rigidity of the mounted film.

Still another object is to provide a record card of the type specified, containing one or more microfilms from which distortionless photographic reproductions can easily be made through surface-to-surface contact with the emulsion side of the films while the films are mounted on the card.

Various other objects and advantages will be apparent as the nature of the invention is more fully disclosed.

Punched or perforated statistical cards used in standard punched-cards sorting or classifying machines usually have column headings or indicia printed across the top, and other indicia or numbers printed along a vertical edge representing horizontal rows The intersections between the columns and rows are punched out or perforated according to a predetermined code, so that, when a quantity of such cards are run through the sorting machine, only the card or cards conforming with a specified code will be selected and ejected. As is well known, it is a common practice to mount microfilms and the like on record cards of this type.

The present invention provides a simple and efcient method of mounting microfilms and the like on record cards, which comprises: forming one or more perimetral depressions on the face of the card, of a size and shape depending upon the size and shape of the film to be mounted; coating said perimetral depression with a heat-sensitive adhesive; blanking out the area surrounded by said coated perimetral depression so as to form an aperture or window which is bordered by said coated depression; placing the film in said window with the emulsion side of the film seated on the coated depression; and applying heat and pressure in a manner hereinafter described to the base or plain side of the film while resting the card on a plane surface of a rigid support.

During the application of heat and pressure, the outer border of the emulsion side of the film is firmly bonded to the heat-sensitive adhesive covering the perimetral depression in the card, and the main area of the film containing the image portion of the film is depressed into the blanked-out window of the card so that the emulsion side of this main film area lies flush with the fiat rear surface of the card.

This forming operation gives the film a pan shape with the dished portion of the pan occupying the window in the card, and with the surrounding flange or rim of Patented May 23, 1961 ICC the pan seated on and firmly bonded to the depression or ledge which borders the window. During the forming operation the film is supported throughout so that it cannot buckle, and the special shape imparted to the film increases its rigidity and inhibits buckling under all conditions of use. Since the emulsion side of the film containing the photographic image is perfectly flat and is fiush with the back of the card, reproductions of the film can easily be made by surface-to-surface contact photography.

The invention is described more in detail in connection with a preferred embodiment illustrated in the accompanying drawing, in which:

Fig. l is a plan view of a microfilm record card showing the spaced perimetral depressions formed therein, and the adhesive coating applied to said depressions;

Fig. 2 is a longitudinal sectional View taken on line 2--2 of Fig. l;

Fig. 3 is a diagrammatic sectional view illustrating the step of blanking out a window in the card;

Fig. 4 is a diagrammatic sectional view illustrating the method of mounting a film on the card;

Fig, 5 is a fragmentary sectional View illustrating the position of the film in the adhesive-coated perimetral depression in the card preparatory to the sealing operation;

Fig. 6 is a fragmentary sectional view similar to Fig. 5 but further illustrating the start of the combined pressure and heat-sealing operation;

Fig. 7 is a view similar to Fig. 6 but showing the position of the parts at the conclusion of the sealing operation;

Fig. 8 is a broken plan view of a microfilm record card with one film mounted therein pursuant to the invention; and

Fig. 9 is a fragmentary section taken on line 9-9 of Fig. 8.

In the drawing, Fig. 1 shows a thin flexible record card 1 for use in standard card classification systems, having any desired column headings or indicia 2, and having numbers 3 along one edge representing horizontal rows. According to the usual practice, users of record cards of this type punch holes or perforations 4 at certain intersections between the columns 2 and rows 3 according to a predetermined code, as is well understood in the art.

In carrying out the invention, l form a plurality of spaced aligned perimetral depressions 5 of rectangular contour in the face of card 1, as shown in Fig. l. The dimensions of these perimetral depressions 5, which resemble a flat rectangular picture frame, depend upon the dimensions of the films to be mounted thereon. For example, the outer perimeter of each depression may be 2 inches X 1?/16 inch, and the inner perimeter of each depression may be 113/16 inch X W16 inch, in which case the width of the depression itself will be 1A; inch. In the embodiment illustrated, the depth of each depression 5 is .002 inch. For a reason hereinafter eX- plained, the overall outer dimensions of said depressions, 2 inches x 13716 inch in the example mentioned, are appreciably greater than the dimensions of the rectangular microfilms to be mounted on the card.

A heat-sensitive adhesive coating 6, preferably of gelatin, is next applied to each of the narrow perimetral depressions 5 in the face of the card 1. This coating 6 covers each rectangular perimetral depression, as shown in Fig. 2. However, it is immaterial if, in coating the depressions 5 with the adhesive, some of the adhesive happens to lap over into the portions of the card which are surrounded by the respective depressions 5.

Fig. 3 illustrates diagrammatically the step of blanking out the rectangular area surrounded by one of the adhesive-coated perimetral depressions 5 in the card 1. This operation may be performed simply and instantly by means of a suitable die 7 and cooperating vertically movable cutting plunger 8 Fig. 3 shows the plunger 8 descending and cutting out the rectangular blank 9 which is discarded as waste, and leaving the narrow perimetral depression containing the previously applied adhesive coating 6 surrounding the resulting rectangular aperture or window 10.

Fig. 4 shows a conventional rectangular thermoplastic microfilm 12 which is to be mounted on the perimetral depression or ledge 5 so that it may be viewed through the blanked-out window 10. This microfilm 12, which may be made of cellulose acetate, has the usual base or plain side 13, and the usual emulsion side 14 which bears the image portion 15 (Fig. 8) of the film. In the embodiment illustrated, the film 12 is .006 inch thick, hence it is appreciably thicker than the depth of the depression or ledge 5 which is .002 inch in the present instance. The image portion or picture area 15 of film 12 is appreciably smaller in both dimensions than the window 10 (which measures 112716 inch X 5715 inch in the example mentioned) so that the image will be clearly viewable through the Window. The outer dimensions of film 12 are appreciably greater than the dimensions of the window 10 (11%/16 inch x 9/16 inch) but are appreciably smaller than the outer dimensions of the depression or ledge 5 (2 inch X 1%6 inch in the example mentioned); for example, the film may measure llt/1G inch X 117/16 inch.

Figs. 4-7 illustrate diagrammatically the step of mounting the rectangular microfilm 12 on the perimetral depression or ledge 5 surrounding the blanked-out window 10. The card 1 is placed face-up on a fiat rigid support or bed 16, and the film 12 is placed emulsion-side down on the adhesive-coated depression 5 surrounding said window 10. The film is centered on the depression 5 and is engaged on its base or plain side 13 by the movable heater member or block 18. 'This heater block 18 is composed of suitable insulating material of rectangular contour, and its forward film-engaging surface has a flat central raised rectangular area 19 which is slightly smaller in lengt and width than the window 10 in card 1, and a fiat depressed perimetral border 20 which surrounds said raised rectangular area 19 and is wider than the window 10 in card 1. This depressed border portion 20 of heater block 18 carries a fiat rectangular electrical resistance heating element 21 which overlies the marginal edges of film 12, outwardly of the picture area 15 of said film, and reaches beyond the outer perimeter of said film and inside the window area of said film, as shown in Figs. 4-7.

As shown in Figs. 4-6, the card 1 is seated face-up on the rigid flat support 16, the film 12 is seated on the depression or ledge 5 which surrounds the window 10 of the card with the outer portion of the emulsion side 14 of the film engaging thermoplastic adhesive coating 6 on said ledge 5, and the heater block 18 (Fig. 7) engages the entire base or plain side 13 of the film while the heating element 21 overlies the marginal edges of the film as described above. With the film in this position on the card, it will be noted in Fig. 6 that the film does not extend to the outer peripheral edge of the depression or ledge 5, but rather leaves the outer portion of said ledge vacant so that the marginal portion of the plain side of the film, made plastic by the ensuing application of heat and pressure, may fiow into such vacant space as explained below.

Upon the application of heat and pressure by heater block 18, the heat-sensitive coating 6 on ledge 5 of the card softens and adheres intimately to the peripheral emulsion surface 14 of film 12. By first moistcning the coating 6, prior to heating, the temperature during the welding operation can be considerably' reduced. Sirnultaneously, this application of heat to the base or plain side 13 of the film causes the following mechanical changes in the marginal area of the film 12 outwardly of the image portion 15 of said film: the outer marginal edge portion of the plain side of the film flows outwardly, almost but usually not quite to the outer marginal edge of the depression or ledge 5 on which the film is seated (Fig. 7); and the central raised rectangular area 19 of heater block 18 depresses the main body portion of film 12 (which includes on its emulsion side the entire image portion 15 as well as an adjacent area surrounding said image portion) downwardly into the blanked-out window 10 of card 1 until the emulsion side of this main body portion of the film lies fiush with the rear face of the card 1 (Figs. 7 and 9). `In one typical operation according to the invention, the temperature of the heating element 21 was 475 F., applied for 0.7 second, the temperature where applied directly to the plain side of the film was 375 F., and the maximum temperature reaching the emulsion side of the film was 250 F. The emulsion side of the film does not flow thermoplastically under this treatment.

The foregoing operation thus converts the film 12 to what might be called a pan shape comprising the marginal flange portion or rim which is now firmly bonded to the depression or ledge 5 of card 1, and the central dished area which fills the window 10 and has its emulsion side 14 bearing the image portion 15 of the film flush with the fiat back of the card (Fig. 9). During the abovedescribed forming operation all portions of the film 12 are under pressure at all times during the heating cycle, hence there is no place for the film to buckle. The finished pan-shape of the film described above greatly increases the rigidity of the film and inhibits any tendency to buckle. And since the heat is applied to the base or plain side 13 of the film, the heat docs not adversely affect the emulsion or cause any distortion of the image.

Ordinarily, the user of microfilm record cards of the present invention will punch the codc holes 4 in the cards before the above-described step of blanking out any window 10 in the card, since the presence of window holes would ordinarily interfere with the encoding operation or with the use of such coded cards for making duplicate coded cards. After the coding operation, as many windows 10 are blanked out as are required to accommodate the film or films to be mounted on a given card, the maximum number of films in the case of the card illustrated herein being four.

In making a photographic reproduction of any microfilm it is essential to maintain a perfectly fiat surface-tosurface contact with the emulsion side of said lm, otherwise the reproduced image may be seriously distorted and commercially unacceptable. In the microfilm record card of the preesnt invention `the emulsion side 14 of film 12 is perfectly flat and is flush with the back of the card 1, hence it is a simple matter to make perfect photographic reproductions of the film as required.

Although a specific embodiment of the invention has been shown and described herein for purposes of illustration, it will be evident to those skilled in the art that the invention is capable of various modifications and adaptations within the scope of the appended claims.

The invention claimed is:

l. Method of mounting a photographic film on a record card of the type used in card classification Systems, which comprises forming a perimetral depression on said card of the same general shape as said film and having an outer perimeter appreciably larger than said film and an inner perimeter appreciably larger than the image area of said film, coating said depression with an adhesive, blanking out the portion of said card surrounded by said coated depression to form a window bordered by said depression, placing said film in said window with the emulsion side of the film seated on said coated depression, sealing the contacting portions of said film and said depression together with said adhesive coating, and permanently depressing the portion of said film within said window to bring the emulsion side of said lm iiush with said card.

2. Method of mounting a thermoplastic photographic film on a record card of the type used in card classication systems, which comprises forming a narrow perimetral depression on said card of the same general shape as said film and having an outer perimeter appreciably larger than said lm and an inner perimeter appreciably larger than the image area on said film, coating said depression with a heatesensitive adhesive, blanking out the portion of said card surrounded by said coated depression to form a Window bordered by said depression, supporting said card on a rigid at surface with said coated depression upward, placing said lm in said window with the emulsion side of said film seated on said coated depression, heating Iand depressing the plain side of said iilm in the region above said depression to heat-seal the emulsion side of said lm to said depression, and simultaneously depressing the portion of said film within said window until the emulsion side of said lm bearing said image area is ush with the side of the card which is supported on said at surface.

3. A ilm record card of the type used in card classification systems, comprising a card containing a window and a depressed perimetral ledge surrounding said window on one side of said card, and a photographic lm mounted in said window with its emulsion side toward the reverse side of said card, said film being in the general shape of la dished pan having a rim secured to said ledge and a dished portion containing the photographic image lying flush with said reverse side of said card.

4. A microfilm record card of the type used in card classification systems, comprising a card having a window formed therein, a depressed perimetral ledge surrounding said window on the front face of said card, and a thermoplastic photographic film mounted in said window with its plain side toward the front face of said card, its emulsion side toward the rear face of said card and its photographic picture area well within and clearly viewable through said window, said film being in the general shape of a dished pan of a thickness greater than the depth of said depressed ledge having its emulsion-coated rim adhesively secured on said ledge and a dished portion containing said photographic picture area lying ush with the rear face of said card, the outer marginal rim portion of the plain side of said lm being compressed and spread outwardly on said ledge to a thickness less than the depth of said ledge.

5. A microfilm record card of .the type used in card classification systems, comprising a card containing a rectangular window, a depressed rectangular perimetral ledge surrounding said window on the front face of said card, and a rectangular thermoplastic photographic lm mounted in said window with its plain side toward the front face of said card, its emulsion side toward the rear face of said card and its photographic picture area well within and clearly viewable through the area of said window which is surrounded by said ledge, said film being in the general shape of a dished rectangular pan of a thickness greater than the depth of said depressed ledge having its emulsion-coated rim adhesively secured on said ledge and a rectangular dished portion containing said photographic picture area lying flush with the rear face of said card, the outer marginal rim portion of the plain side of said lm being spread outwardly on said ledge to a thickness less than the depth of said ledge.

References Cited in the tile of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,633,655 Langan Apr. 7, 1953 2,690,021 Langan Sept. 28, 1954 2,859,550 Langan Nov. 11, 1958

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2633655 *Aug 14, 1945Apr 7, 1953Filmsort IncRecord card
US2690021 *Aug 17, 1949Sep 28, 1954Filmsort IncFilm record card and method and apparatus for its production
US2859550 *Jul 24, 1951Nov 11, 1958Miehle Goss Dexter IncFilm record cards and method of making the same
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3103756 *Aug 6, 1962Sep 17, 1963Langan Aperture Cards IncAperture cards
US3197905 *Jul 23, 1963Aug 3, 1965Brause & CoPerforated film card
US3212206 *Apr 30, 1962Oct 19, 1965Langan Aperture Cards IncAperture cards
US3279111 *Jul 26, 1962Oct 18, 1966IbmFilm record card and method of making same
US3283432 *Jun 23, 1964Nov 8, 1966IbmFilm record cards and method for making same
US3289344 *Dec 23, 1963Dec 6, 1966IbmFilm record cards and method for making the same
US3373265 *Dec 12, 1962Mar 12, 1968Bell & Howell CoInformation storage and retrieval process and coded record card therefor
US3406477 *Feb 13, 1967Oct 22, 1968IbmFilm record card and method for making same
US3421241 *Jan 18, 1966Jan 14, 1969Pitney Bowes IncProtected stencil aperture card
US3465460 *Aug 7, 1968Sep 9, 1969Dahl Ernest A JrFile structure
US3553439 *Oct 4, 1967Jan 5, 1971Bellhow Jackets IncMicrofiche master having magnetic tracks
US3779786 *Jan 14, 1972Dec 18, 1973Eastman Kodak CoMethod for manufacturing aperture cards
US4957579 *May 26, 1989Sep 18, 1990Knowlton Glenn CMethod and apparatus for applying liquid acid to a surface
Classifications
U.S. Classification40/702, 493/944, 40/703, 493/379, 235/489, 235/487
International ClassificationG06K19/02, G03B21/64, B42F19/00
Cooperative ClassificationB42F19/00, Y10S493/944, G06K19/02, G06K19/022, G03B21/64
European ClassificationG03B21/64, B42F19/00, G06K19/02A, G06K19/02