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Publication numberUS2985164 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 23, 1961
Filing dateFeb 13, 1959
Priority dateFeb 13, 1959
Publication numberUS 2985164 A, US 2985164A, US-A-2985164, US2985164 A, US2985164A
InventorsImoto Eddie M
Original AssigneeImoto Eddie M
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Collapsible camp stove
US 2985164 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

y 3, 1961 E. M. IMOTO 2,985,164

COLLAPSIBLE CAMP STOVE Filed Feb. 13, 1959 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 FIG. 1. 66

INVENTOR. 500/5 M. 01407-0,

May 23, 1961 E. M. IMOTO COLLAPSIBLE CAMP STOVE 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Feb. 13, 1959 FIG. 3.

IN VEN TOR.

BY 7/Z M Q4/Mm,

United States Patent 2 'COLLAPSIBLE CAMP STOVE Eddie M. Imoto, Room 8, 1434'Makaloa St, Honolulu, Hawaii Filed Feb. 13, 1959, see No. 793,040

3 Claims. (Cl. 126-25) grills, each secured to the base members by locking clevises and pins and the like. In order to, keep the Weight of such a camp stove to a minimum, the clevises, pins, and other fastening elements are provided in as small a size as possible. Frequently, due to the use whichis made of the camp stove constructed so as to eni'ploy such fastening elements, the fastening elements are inadvertently lost and the usefulness of the stove is impaired.

An object of the Ipresent invention is to .provide -a collapsible camp stove having a grill, a grate, dishsuppor'ting trays or panels; with no separate fastening element which may become inadvertently lost to therefore' render the stove useless. T

Another -object of the present inventionis to provide, a collapsible carnp stove which is compact in size andof suitcase shape when collapsed so that it lends itself, to portability with'e'ase and facility Afu'rther "object of the present invention is to provide. a collapsible camp stove .which.is easily and quickly converted from. the collapsed condition to the erected position. 5 p

A still further' object of the present invention is..,to provide a collapsible camp stove which, is simple in structure, one sturdily constructed, one economical to manufacture and assemble, and one which is highlyeflec: tive in action. 7 1

These and other objects and advantages of the present invention will be fully apparent from the following de-. scription when takenin conjunction with the annexed drawings, in which: i r

c Figure 1 is an isometric viewof' the collapsible camp stove of the present invention, shown in ere'cted -condition, a portion of one tray or platform shown broken away; v I 1 Figure- 2 is a view, on an enlarged scale, taken on ,the line 2-2 of Figure l; V

Figure 3 is a view on an enlarged scale, taken on the line 3--3 of Figure 1; v e I Figure 4 is an isometric view of one of the utensilsupporting platforms or trays of the stove, shown inverted and removed from the stove; and I Figure 5 is an isometric view of'the stove in collapsed folded condition ready for transportation or storage, the dotted line showings indicating the swinging movement of the end panels toward their erected position.

Referring in greater detail to the drawings in which like numerals indicate like parts throughout the several views, the stove of the present invention is designated generally by the reference numeral 10 and comprises an upstanding receptacle 12 having an open top 14 (Figure Patented May 23, 1961 ice 2) and iucludingva bottom 16, spaced side walls'18 and 20 rising from the bottom 16, and end walls 22 and 24-connecting each of the 'complemental ends of the side walls 18 and -20'together. I i

Upright side panels 26 and 28 are positioned above and adjacentto and are in vertical alignment with the side walls .18 and 20, respectively. The lower end edges ofnthesid'e panels 26 and 28 are connected. by hinges 3'0 and 32, respectively, to the upper ends of the side walls 18 and 20 for swinging movement from the upright position, shown in Figures 1. to 3, to position's closing the adjacent part of the open top of the receptacle 12, as shown in full lines in Figure 5. The side panels 26 and 28 are shown in dotted lines in Figure 5 in intermediate positions between their upright positions and their. c'losingp'o'sitions.

1 Upright end panels-34, and 36 are positioned above and adjacent to and are in vertical alignment with the end walls 22 and 24, respectively, the lower end edges of, the end panels 34 and 36 being connected by hinges 38 and 40, respectively, to the upper ends of the end walls 22 and 24 for swinging movement fromthe upright .po'sitions tonpositions below the open top 14 of the receptacle 12.and within the receptacle 12. These last-named positions. of the endpanels 3'4 and 36 are, shown in dotted lines in Figure 2.

Cooperating releasable-latching elements are provide on the side panels 26 and 28 and the end panels 3 4 l and 36 for holding the side .panels 26 and 28 and the end panels- 34 and 36 in'the upright positions. 'Specifica'lly, these elements include eye formations 42 secured to each'end of each of the side panels 26 and 28 and each receiving a-tubular member 44 arranged in an uprightdire'c'tion on the adjacent part of each of the end panels 34 and 36, as shown in Figure 1, with respect to the tubular member 44 on the end panels 34.

An iinpo'rtanttfeature ofv the present invention is that; while'a :pinfof any length longer than the width of the eye'formations 42 may be used to be inserted in the respective tubular-*mer'nber 44 for locking the tubular member '44 whenyprojecting out of the eye formation 42, such a separate- ,pin' might become inadvertently lost andrtherefo're other means is provided for securing the tubular members 44 in their projected positions rela-. tiye .to the eyefformations 42 and the panels are in their upright positions. Preferably, these pins are also supporting members 46 for the platforms 48 which are provided for the support of the utensils exteriorly of each end of the stove 10 and contiguous with the upper ends of'sthe' en'd :panels 34 and 36. One such platform 48 Y is shown inverted in Figure 4 with the support member 46 connected 'thereto by brackets 50 and 5?. for swing-- ing "movement from the nested position, as shown, to

the position in' -wlii'ch'the pin portion 54 of the support member 46 is vertical, as shown in dotted lines. v The :pin p'o'rtion' 54 of each of the supporting membe'rs 46 -is s'lidably' receivable in the adjacent tubular member 44'when the platforms '48 are positioned adjacent to and exterior-1y of the end panels 34 and 36 adjacent the upper end ofthe latter.

A horizontally disposedgrate 56 is positioned within the space defined by the side panels 26 and 28 and the end panels 34 and 36 when the latter are in their up- Supporting means, embodying brackets 58, project from the'inner faces of the end panels 34 and 36 adjacent their lower ends and receive thereon thegrate 56 when the latter is positioned within the space defined by the side panels 26 and 28 and the" end panels 34 and 36.

The grate 56 is fabricated in two half sections 60 and 62 connected together by a hinge bar 64 for movement from the horizontal position, shown in Figures 1 and 2, to a position in which one of the sections 62, for instance, is parallel to the other section 60, as shown in dotted lines in Figure 2, in which the folded grate is resting upon the bottom 16 of'the receptacle .12. p 1 A horizontally disposed grill 66- bridges and is supported upon the upper ends of the side panels 26 and 28 and the end panels 34 and 36 when the panels are in their upright positions. The grill 66 is also fabricated of two half sections 68 and 70 connected-together by another hinge bar 72 for movement from the horizontal position to a position in which one of the sections 68 or 70 'is in. parallel relation with respect to the other section.

--For reasons of simplification, this folded position of the grill 66 is not shownbut it will be understood to be similar to the folded position shown in dotted lines of the grate 56 when resting upon the bottom of the receptacle 121 1 Each of the bars 64 and 72 have their end portions downwardly and receivable in socket elements '74, 76 provided on the inner faces and outer faces, respectively, of the side panels 26 and 28, as shown in Figure 3.

Leg members 78 and 80 are provided, .each of U-shape, and sockets 82 on the end walls 22 and 24 receive the free ends of the leg members 78 and 80 for support of the receptacle 12 on the leg members 78 and 80'. The portions of each leg member 78, 80, adjacent the free end is inwardly bent to provide a stop for the respective socket 82 and each leg member 78, 80 is outwardly bent so as to provide as wide as possible footing for the receptacle 12.

Draft openings 84 are provided in the receptacle side wall 18 and a handle 86 is pivotally connected to the same side wall 18 for carrying the stove 110 when in the collapsed folded condition, as shown in Figure 5. A 'swiveling button 88'is pivotally mounted on the one end panel 36 and is swingable to a position overthe grill 66 onto either one of the lying the adjacent confronting edges of the side panels 4 26 and 28 when the latter are in their position closing the open top 14 of the receptacle 12, as shown in Figure 5.

In use, the stove 10 is quickly and easily converted from its collapsed or folded condition shown in Figure 5 to the erected position shown in Figures 1 to 3 and the leg members 78 and 80 are quickly and readily attached for supporting the receptacle 12 above a ground surface. When the side panels 26 and 28 are swung upwardly, the end panels 34 and 36 may be swung .to their'upright positions with the tubular members '44 insertedthrough the eye formations '42 on the side panels 26 and 28. Flanges 90, which project from the. ends of the side panels 26 and 28 and carry the eye formations 42, provide rigidity to the panels 26 and 28 and end panels 34 and 36 when they are m the when said end and side Panels are in upright Positions right position and close the corners of the stove 10' above the receptacle 12 against drafts and leakage.

The platforms 48 are next erected with the pin por-E tions 54 of the supporting members 46 inserted into the adjacenttubular members 44 and the grates 56 and grill 66 are unfolded and positioned within the stove '10 and over the upper ends of the side and end panels, respectively. The projecting end portions of the hinge bars 64, 72, are received in the adjacent socket elements 74, 76 provided on 'the inner and outer faces of the side panels 26 and 28 and secure the grate and grill into positions in which either end section may be raised for the insertion of charcoal onto the grate 56 or for raising the grate 56 when it is desired to clear the area' below the grate 56 of burned fuel.

The draft openings 84 provide ample draft for a charge of charcoal when placed on the" grate 56 and the grill 66 is of suflicient strength to-support thereon normally noted cooking utensils which-are shiftable over platforms 48, as desired. Handles 92 are provided at each end of the grate 56 for lifting the grate bodily out of the stove 10 or raising either section 60, 62 separately.

What is claimed is: t

1. A collapsible camp stove comprising an upstanding receptacle open at the top and including a bottom, spaced side Walls rising from said bottom, an end wall connecting each of the complementalends of said side walls together, an upright side panel'positioned above and adjacent to and in vertical alignment with each of said side walls and each having the lower end edge connected to the upper end of the adjacent side wall for swinging movement of said side panel from the upright position to aposition closing the adjacent part of the open top of said receptacle, an upright end panel positioned above and adjacent to and in vertical alignment with each of said end walls and each having the lower end edge connected to the upper end of the adjacent end wall for swinging movement from the upright position to a position below the open .top of said receptacle and within said receptacle, eye formations on said side panels releasably receiving tubular members on said end panels when said end and side panels are in up right positions for holding the panels. in upright posi tions, a platform positioned adjacent to and exteriorly of each end panel adjacent'the upper end of the end panel when in the upright position, and a support member including a pin portion on each of said platforms, the pin portions of said support members being releasably received in the :tubular members of said end panels forholding the platforms vin position on. said. end panels.

2. A collapsible camp stove comprising an..upstanding receptacle open at the top and including a bottom, spaced side walls rising from said bottom, an end wall co'nnectingeach of the complemental endsof said side walls together, 1 an upright side panel positioned above and adjacent to and in vertical alignment .with each of said'side walls and' each having the lower end edge connected-to the upper .end of .the adjacent side wall for swinging movement of said side panel from the upright position to a position closing the adjacent part end panels when in upright positions, supporting means on said end panels and receiving said grate when positioned within the space defined by the side and end panels in upright positions, eye formations on said side panels releasably receiving tubular members on said end panels portion on each of said platforms, thepin portions of' said support members being releasably received in the tubular members of said end panels for holding the platforms in position on said end panels.

3. A collapsible camp stove comprising an upstand ing receptacle open at the top and including a bottom,

said side wallsand each having the lower-end edge con-- nected to the up'perend of the adjacent. side wall for swinging movement of said side panel from-the upright.

position to a position closing "the adjacent'partlof the;

open top of said receptacle, an upright end panel positioned above and adjacent to and in vertical alignment with each of said end walls and each having the lower end edge connected to the upper end of the adjacent end wall for swinging movement from the upright position to a position below the open top of said receptacle and within said receptacle, cooperating releasable latching elements on said side and end panels for holding them in the upright positions, a platform positioned adjacent to and exteriorly of each end panel adjacent the upper end of the end panel when in the upright position, and a support member on each of said platforms, the support members being releasably received in the latching elements for holding the platforms in position on said end panels.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS Morawetz Feb. Gertenbach Nov. Goldberg et al. Ian. Tait et al. Dec. Bates Aug. Carroll Jan. Overman May Sava Feb. Gehne Oct. Sheedlo Dec.

Brender Jan.

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
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US871266 *Oct 17, 1906Nov 19, 1907Louise GertenbachAuxiliary grate for stoves and ranges.
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US1438345 *Nov 10, 1921Dec 12, 1922Austin Tait WalterFolding camp stove
US1466463 *Apr 21, 1922Aug 28, 1923Livingood Mfg CorpFolding stove
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US2627854 *Sep 21, 1948Feb 10, 1953Sava Sal JPortable grille
US2910059 *Aug 27, 1956Oct 27, 1959Evans Mfg Co JackesLeg assembly
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US2922414 *Jun 25, 1956Jan 26, 1960Brender Jack PCamp stove
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3044421 *May 25, 1960Jul 17, 1962Franzheim George WCombination gas fired incinerator and charcoal broiler
US3059633 *Nov 21, 1960Oct 23, 1962Hakon BardsenFood ration kits for sports and military use
US3105483 *Feb 13, 1962Oct 1, 1963Lloyd BryanPortable and collapsible cooking device
US3245398 *Oct 7, 1963Apr 12, 1966Su Ev IncFire grate for barbecue grills
US3438363 *May 22, 1967Apr 15, 1969Lisbon Ind IncPortable heater
US3667446 *Aug 12, 1970Jun 6, 1972Morton Paul SCharcoal grill
US3892222 *Jul 5, 1974Jul 1, 1975Darbo Rolf EFolding combined broiler, oven and stove
US3905286 *May 3, 1973Sep 16, 1975Le Grady Carl FBarbecue grill
US4337751 *Feb 1, 1980Jul 6, 1982Sampson Gerald LBarbecue grill accessory
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US4589399 *Mar 18, 1985May 20, 1986Hamill Stephen DPortable cooking device
US4688541 *Jul 22, 1986Aug 25, 1987Weber-Stephen Products Co.Attachment for barbecue grill
US4762114 *Sep 24, 1987Aug 9, 1988Blankemeyer William JPortable cooking apparatus with a removable work table
US5048505 *Mar 14, 1991Sep 17, 1991Pyromid, Inc.Cooking and storing apparatus
US5553601 *Jun 7, 1994Sep 10, 1996Parker, Inc.Barbecue
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US6910476Dec 13, 2002Jun 28, 2005Weber-Stephen Products Co.Barbecue grill and support frame assembly
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US7222619Aug 12, 2004May 29, 2007Original Ideas, IncStorable shelves for a barbecue
US7438071Sep 14, 2005Oct 21, 2008Weber-Stephen Products, Co.Barbecue grill with folding shelves
US7762249May 11, 2006Jul 27, 2010Weber-Stephen Products, Co.Barbecue grill with frame and mounting assembly
US8161958Dec 4, 2008Apr 24, 2012Weber-Stephen Products Co.Barbecue cooking apparatus with base having folding shelves
US8726896 *Oct 6, 2008May 20, 2014Morris GuilloryBarbecue grill having a split lid
US8851060Sep 12, 2008Oct 7, 2014Weber-Stephen Products Co.Barbecue cooking apparatus with folding shelves
US20020020405 *Aug 10, 2001Feb 21, 2002Brian ColemanPortable barbecue grill
US20040112364 *Dec 13, 2002Jun 17, 2004Mark JohnsonBarbecue grill and support frame assembly
US20050166767 *Apr 4, 2005Aug 4, 2005Mark JohnsonBarbecue grill and support frame assembly
US20090084376 *Dec 4, 2008Apr 2, 2009Mark JohnsonBarbecue cooking apparatus with base having folding shelves
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Classifications
U.S. Classification126/25.00R, 126/9.00R
International ClassificationF24B1/20, F24B1/00
Cooperative ClassificationF24B1/205
European ClassificationF24B1/20B2