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Publication numberUS2985983 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 30, 1961
Filing dateMay 1, 1959
Priority dateMay 1, 1959
Publication numberUS 2985983 A, US 2985983A, US-A-2985983, US2985983 A, US2985983A
InventorsKonstenius Wilbert P
Original AssigneeKonstenius Wilbert P
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Toy power shovel
US 2985983 A
Abstract  available in
Images(3)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

y 0, 1961 w. P. KONSTENIUS 2,985,983

TOY POWER Sl-IOVEL Filed May 1, 1959 5 Sheets-Sheet 1 IN V EN TOR.

W/L 652 7' 4 Ko/vs TE'IV/ (/8 mmzwgaa/m y 1961 w. P. KONSTENIUS 2,985,983

TOY POWER SI-IOVEL Filed May 1, 1959 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 My mmrgawon 4 rrae/vsys y 1961 w. P. KONSTENIUS 2,985,983

' TOY POWER SHOVEL Filed May 1, 1959 3 Sheets-Sheet 3 v S, v

Q Arraews VS United States Patent TOY POWER SHOVEL Wilbert P. Konstenius, Rte. 2, Box 95, Embarrass, Minn.

Filed May 1, 1959, Ser. No. 810,420

4 Claims. (CI. 46-40) The present invention relates to toys generally and in particular to a toy power shovel.

Previously proposed and presently in use are toy power shovels employing various means for eifecting the digging movement and emptying movement of the scoop or dipper. Generally, such means has consisted in cables variously arranged and connected to hand manipulated drums within the cab body of the shovel. Generally, such toy power shovels have not met with acceptance for the reason that children, playing with the shovels, find the cables a source of irritation and nuisance and therefore unworkable for the purpose intended. While such power shovels as have been proposed and are presently in use follow along the lines of design and construction of real power shovels, including the attachment and manipulation of the dipper or scoop by cables, such toy power shovels fail to retain the interest of a child for the reason that the controls operating the miniature cables do not give the feel of operation which is apparent to a child watching an adult operate a real or full sized power shovel.

An object of the present invention is to provide a toy power shovel which has a scoop or dipper operable in response to actuating means which provides the child operating the toy power shovel the apparent feel in operation of the controls that an adult operator of a full size shovel experiences or apparently experiences.

Another object of the present invention is to provide a toy power shovel having novel means for manipulating the scoop or dipper in digging and loading operations, such means being positive in operation and under the control of a child using the same during all movements of the scoop or dipper, and one which is highly eifective in action.

A further object of the present invention is to provide a toy power shovel which is sturdy in construction, one having long-life characteristics, one which may be economically manufactured and assembled, and one which affords a child operating the same an optimum degree of interest and amusement. These and other objects and advantages of the present invention will be fully apparent from the following description when taken in conjunction with the annexed drawings, in which:

Figure 1 is an isometric view of the toy power shovel according to the present invention;

Figure 2 is a view on the line 2-2 of Figure I, a rearward portion of the shovel being broken away, the scoop of the shovel being-shown in a digging position relative to a mound of earth;

Figure 3 is a view similar to Figure 2, showing the scoop in loaded position;

Figure 4 is a view similar to Figures 2 and 3, showing the scoop of the shovel in position for discharging its load;

Figure 5 is a view taken onthe line *5-5 of Figure 3;

Figure 6 is a view taken on the line 66 of Figure 5;

Figure 7 isa view taken on the line 77 of Figure 3, on an enlarged scale; and

ice

Figure 8 is an isometric view of the scoop or dipper with a portion of the dipper stick broken away.

Referring in greater detail to the drawings in which like numerals indicate like parts throughout the several views, the reference numeral 10 designates generally the toy power shovel according to the present invention and which comprises a base 12 simulating the endless track mechanism. A frame, designated generally by the reference numeral 14, is connected to the base 12 by means of a vertically disposed pivot pin 16. The frame includes a box-like structure 18 simulating the working cab of a power shovel. A bearing assembly 20 (Figure 2) supports the floor 22 of the structure 18 and permits rotation of the structure 18 about the pivot pin 16 as an axis.

The forward end 24 of the frame 14 carries a boom 26 arranged in an upwardly and outwardly sloping direction. The boom 26 is positioned adjacent the forward ,end 24 of the frame 14 and has its lower end 28 connected by a pivot pin 30 to trunnions 32 which project upwardly from the forward end portion of the frame 14.

The pivot pin 30 constitutes means connecting the boom 26 to the frame 14 for upward and downward movement about a horizontal axis.

Intermediate the ends of the boom 26 and inwardlyof the upper end thereof is a closed slot 34 in which is mounted a sleeve 36. The sleeve 36 is vertically disposed when the toy shovel is in position for diggingin a ground surface. A pivot pin 38 extends through the boom 26 and connects the sleeve 36 to the boom 26.for swinging movement about the pin 38 as a horizontal axis.

A dipper stick 40 is slidably supported in the sleeve 36 and carries on its upper end a stop 42 preventing movement of the stick 40 entirely out of the sleeve 36 in one direction. The lower end of the stick 40 carries a forwarclly facing dipper or scoop 44 having an open front provided with cutting teeth 46 and having a swingable gate 48 on its rearward end normally closing the open lower or rear end of the scoop 44.

The top 50 of the structure 18 forms a seat for a child operating the shovel 10. A first actuating lever 52 extends in a vertical direction and is positioned adjacent to the seat portion of the structure 18 so that the handle 54on the upper end of the lever 52 is accessible to a child when seated on the structure 18. Portions of the top 50, as shown in Figure l, are bent downwardly and formed with sleeves on their lower ends receiving a horizontally disposed support rod 56 which has its ends extending out of the side walls 58 and 60 of the structure 18. The bent down portions of the top 50 are designated by the numerals 62 and 64.

The lever 52 is pivotally mounted upon the portion of the rod 56 intermediate the bent down top portions 62 and 64 and is movable forwardly and backwardly about the rod 56 as an axis.

A link element 66 has one end pivotally connected;to

the lever 52 at a point adjacent to and spaced abovethe rod 56 and has its other end pivotally connected to the boom 26 at a point adjacent to and spaced from the lower end of the slot 34.

A second lever 68 having a handle 70 on its upper end is pivotally connected intermediate its ends to the rod 56 for swinging back and forth movement. The handle 70, as shown most clearly in Figure 5, is positioned below the handle 54 of the lever 52. The lever 68 is L-shaped and disposed so that its shorter leg extends forwardly of the rod 56, the short leg being shown most clearly in Figure 3 and designated by the numeral 72. A loop'element 74 is dependingly carried on the lower end of-the leg 72 of the lever 68 and slidably receives an intermediate portion of a link element 76 which has one end pivotally connected to the lower end portion of the:lever-52 by pin 96 and has the other end pivotally connected to a rearwardly projecting lug 78 carried on the stick 40 at a slot 80cut in the boom 26, the slot 80'having one closed end and another end open traversed by the pivot pin 30, as shown most clearly in Figure 7. The loop element 74 Constitutes a link or link element connecting the lever '63 to the link element 76 for upward and downward movement of the link element 76 responsive to backward and forward movement of the lever 68.

The gate 48 is actuated by gravity to an open position from its normally closed position when the dipper or scoop 44 is swung upwardly to a discharging position, as shown in Figure 4. Hand actuable means is provided operatively connected to a releasable latch means which normally holds'the gate in the closed position. This latch meansis shown most clearly in Figures 4 and 8 and consists in a ring 82 circumposed about the stick 40 and having an extension 84 projecting from one side thereof and bent to form a U-shaped abutment'86. The gate 48 is connected to the scoop 44 by the hinge pin 88 on the portion of the scoop 44 adjacent the connection of the scoop 44 to the stick 40. The abutment 86 of the ring 82 bears against a portion of the gate 48 adjacent and spaced from the hinge pin 88 and the ring 82 tilts, under the action of gravity when the scoop 44 is in its lowermost position, to bind against the adjacent part of the stick 40. An eye formation 90 is carried on the part of the ring 82 opposite to the extension 84 and one end of a trip cord 92 is secured in the eye formation 90. The other end of the trip cord 92 is secured to an eye formation 94, shown in dotted lines in Figures 3 and 6, carried by the portion of the link element 76 adjacent its pivotal connection to the lower end portion of the lever 52.

Intermediate portions of the trip cord 92 are threaded through eye formations 98 and 100 carried 'by the leg 72 of thelever 68 and by the one leg 102 of a third lever 104 which is pivotally mounted upon the rod 56 adjacent to and in substantial alignment with the lever 68.

The end of the lever 104 remote from the eye formation 100 carries a handle 106 below (Figure and in alignment with the handle 70 of the lever 68.

Both of the levers 68 and 104 are formed of strap material with the portions adjacent their lower ends turned at a ninety degree angle to the portions which are pivoted on the rod 56. This structure is shown most clearly in Figures 5 and 6.

The portion of the lever 52 which supports and is pivotally connected to the adjacent end of the link element 76 is U-shaped, as at Figure 5, and has a pivot pin 108 extending through the legs of the U-shaped portion pivotally connecting the one end of the link element 76 to the lever 52 at a point on one side of the rod 56 opposite to the pivotal connection of the link element 66 to the lever 52.

A pin 110 is anchored in the lever 68 at a point adjacent to and above the rod 56 and extends through an arcuate slot 112 provided in the lever 104. The pin 110 and slot 112 permit limited relative movement of the lever 104 relative to the lever 68 but movement of the lever 68 backward and forward carries the lever 104 with it so that the handle 106 is always adjacent to the handle 70.

Another eye formation 114 is dependingly carried on the bifurcated end portion of the link element 76 adjacent the point of connection of the latter to the lug 78 on the dipper stick 40 and through this eye formation 114 is threaded the trip cord 92.

In operation, a child may straddle the toy power shovel and seat himself on a portion of the top 50 rearwardly of the handles 54, 70, and 106. The child may, with his right hand on the handle 54, manipulate the lever 52 so 'as to extend forwardly and retract rearwardly the scoop 44 to dig in a mound of earth such-is shown in Figures 2 and'3 and designated by-the numeral 116.

Backward movement upon the lever '68 willeffe'ct the raising of the link element 76 and the connected scoop 44 so that dirt gathered within the scoop 44 may be raised to an elevated position, as shown in Figure 4, and, with the application of pressure rearwardly on the handle 106 on the lever 104, the trip cord 92 is tightened between its connections on the eye formation 94 and eye formation 90 so that tension is applied to the side of the ring 82 op posite to the extension 84 and abutment 86. This relieves the binding of the ring 82 on the stick 40 and permits sliding movement of the ring 82 on the stick 40 toward the lug 78. Gravity, acting on the gate 48, swings the gate 48 to the dotted line position shown in Figure 4 to discharge the contents of the scoop 44.

Upon further manipulation of the levers 52 and 68, the digger or dipper stick 40 is returned to the vertical position (Figure 2) for further digging movements of the scoop 44 in the earth surface.

It is to be noted that realistic'motion is achieved by the connection of the link elements 76 and 66 to the boom 26 and dipper stick 40, with the boom 26 moving rearwardly a short distance upon rearward movement of the lever 52 and with the dipper stick 40 pushed forwardly responsive to the same rearward movement of the lever 52.

These motions are identical to the motions of conventional power shovels of commercial use although the levers of such a commercial power shovel control cables and drums which raise and lower the boom and dipper stick of such shovel.

An important feature of the present invention resides in the positioning of the handle 106 relative to the handle 70. This mechanism for tripping the gate 48 to the released position enables a child to accurately and quickly'dump the contents of the scoop 44 in a toy vehicle or in a place of disposal with ease and facility and with a high degree of accuracy. The handle 106 of the lever 104 is at all times convenient to the fingers of the hand holding the handle and through all movements of the lever 68, the lever 104 follows so that the scoop 44 may be emptied in any position in which the gate 48 may be opened by gravity when the abutment 86 is shifted out of engagement with the gate 48.

What is claimed is:

1. In a toy power shovel, a vehicle frame having a forward end, a seat on said frame, a boom arranged in an upwardly and outwardly sloping direction positioned adjacent the forward end of said frame and having the lower end connected to the forward end of said vehicle frame for upward and downward movement, a dipper stick slidably supported on said boom, a forward facing dipper on the lower end of said dipper stick, a firstactuating lever positioned adjacent to said seat and accessible to an occupant of said seat and connected intermediate its ends 'to said frame for forward and backward movement, a first link element connecting said boom to said lever'for movement with the lever, a second link element connecting said dipper stick to said lever for movement wtih said lever, a second actuating lever positioned adjacent said seat and accessible to an occupant of said seat and connected intermediate its ends to said frame for'forward and backward movement, and a third link element connecting said second lever to said second link element for movement with said second link element.

2. In a toy power shovel, a vehicle frame having a forward end, a seat onsaid frame, a boom arranged in an upwardly and outwardly sloping direction positioned adjacent the forward end of said frame and having the lower end connected to the forward end of said vehicle frame for upward and downward movement 'in said sleeve, a forward facing dipper on the lower end of 'said dipper stick, a first actuating lever positioned adjacent to said seat and accessible to anoccup'ant of said seat and connected intermediate its ends to said frame for forward and backward movement about a third horizontal axis, a first link element connecting said boom to said lever for movement with the lever, a second link element connecting said dipper stick to said lever for movement with said lever, a second actuating lever positioned adjacent said seat and accessible to an occupant of said seat and connected intermediate its ends to said frame for forward and backward movement, and a third link element connecting said second lever to said second link element for movement with said second link element.

3. In a toy power shovel, a vehicle frame having a forward end, a seat on said frame, a boom arranged in an upwardly and outwardly sloping direction positioned adjacent the forward end of said frame and having the lower end connected to the forward end of said vehicle frame for upward and downward movement about a first horizontal axis, a vertical sleeve positioned contiguous to said boom between the ends thereof and connected to said boom for swinging movement about a second horizontal axis, a dipper stick slidably supported in said sleeve, a forward facing dipper on the lower end of said dipper stick, a first actuating lever positioned adjacent to said seat and accessible to an occupant of said seat and connected intermediate its ends to said frame for forward and backward movement about a third horizontal axis, a first link element connecting said boom to said lever for movement with the lever, a second link element connecting said dipper stick to said lever for movement with said lever, a second actuating lever positioned adjacent said seat and accessible to an occupant of said seat and connected intermediate its ends to said frame for forward and backward movement about said third axis, and a third link element connecting said second lever to said second link element for movement with said second link element.

4. In a toy power shovel, a vehicle frame having a forward end, a seat on said frame, a boom arranged in an upwardly and outwardly sloping direction positioned adjacent the forward end of said frame and having the lower end connected to the forward end of said vehicle frame for upward and downward movement, a dipper stick slidably supported on said boom, a forward facing dipper on the lower end of said dipper stick, a first actuating lever positioned adjacent to said seat and accessible to an occupant of said seat and connected intermediate its ends to said frame for forward and backward movement, a first link element connecting said boom to said lever for movement with the lever, a second link element connecting said dipper stick to said lever for movement with said lever, a second actuating lever positioned adjacent said seat and accessible to an occupant of said seat and connected intermediate its ends to said frame for forward and backward movement, and a third link clement connecting said second lever to said second link element for upward and downward movement responsive to backward and forward movement of said second lever.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,302,857 Sabina May 6, 1919 1,827,541 Opperman Oct. 13, 1931 1,955,457 Gaver Apr. 17, 1934 2,478,084 Brown Aug. 2, 1949

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1302857 *Feb 19, 1918May 6, 1919Sabina Company Inc EMechanical toy.
US1827541 *Aug 25, 1930Oct 13, 1931Otto F OppermanChild's power shovel
US1955457 *Oct 6, 1933Apr 17, 1934Roscoe M GaverToy power shovel
US2478084 *Aug 7, 1947Aug 2, 1949George E BrownMechanical toy shovel
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3308573 *Jan 27, 1964Mar 14, 1967Mattel IncSkip loader toy with sounding means
US3874111 *Jan 30, 1974Apr 1, 1975Tonka CorpToy bulldozer
US3911615 *Jul 24, 1974Oct 14, 1975Quaker Oats CoToy scoop loader
US6508320Feb 8, 2001Jan 21, 2003Mattel, Inc.Children's ride-on vehicle and bucket assembly
US7128633 *Jul 23, 2004Oct 31, 2006Eric Steven WilsonMechanical arm
US7347763 *Nov 17, 2004Mar 25, 2008Franz Schneider Gmbh & Co. KgToy vehicle for children
Classifications
U.S. Classification446/426, 414/690
International ClassificationA63H17/00, A63H17/12
Cooperative ClassificationA63H17/12
European ClassificationA63H17/12