Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2986395 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateMay 30, 1961
Filing dateFeb 4, 1957
Priority dateFeb 4, 1957
Publication numberUS 2986395 A, US 2986395A, US-A-2986395, US2986395 A, US2986395A
InventorsSheftel Harry
Original AssigneeSheftel Harry
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Adjustable basketball goal
US 2986395 A
Images(3)
Previous page
Next page
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

May 30, 1961 H. SHEFTEL ADJUSTABLE BASKETBALL GOAL 3 Sheets-Sheet 1 Filed Feb. 4, 1957 INVENTOR.

HARRY SHEFTEL /W ATTORNEY H. SHEFTEL ADJUSTABLE BASKETBALL GOAL May 30, 1961 5 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Feb. 4, 1957 INVENTOR.

HARRY SHEFTEL BY ATTORNEY May 30, 1961 H. SHEFTEL ADJUSTABLE BASKETBALL com.

3 Sheets-Sheet 3 Filed Feb. 4, 1957 INVENTOR.

HARRY SHEFTEL L. Jl

ATTORNEY United SW68 I atefifio ADJUSTABLE BASKETBALL GOAL Harry Sheftel, 350 Clocks Blvd., Amityville, N.Y.

Filed Feb. 4, 1957, Ser. No. 638,122

2 Claims. (Cl. 273-15) This invention relates to basketball goals. More particularly, the invention relates to a basketball goal which is mechanically adjustable as to height.

Basketball is a universally popular game to which mature players are attracted, but by reason of the height of the goal from the playing surface, the game has little satisfaction for immature players who have not yet attained their full stature and, as a result, such players do not play the game with sustained enthusiasm. It is the purpose of this invention to provide a basketball goal that can be quickly raised and lowered by mechanical means so that the height thereof can be adjusted to accommodate players of various age groups. By lowering the goal in proportion to the height of a playing group, the game can be made just as attractive to the young player as it now is to the mature player.

It is, therefore, an object of the invention to provide an adjustable support for a basketball backboard and goal.

It is another object of the invention to provide an adjustable support for a basketball backboard and basket which is telescopic and has associated therewith a simple gear train by which the height of the telescopic support can be adjusted with case.

It is still another object of the invention to provide a basketball goal which is light in weight so that it may be moved readily from one location to another; yet one which is sufiiciently sturdy to withstand all the impact thereon common to the game.

It is a further object of the invention to provide a basketball goal that is capable of infinite adjustment in height within a given range of adjustability, and one which can be locked in any position of adjustment.

These and other objects of the invention will appear from the following specification when read in light of the drawings, wherein:

Fig. 1 is an elevational view of a basketball goal of standard size and height, constructed in accordance with this invention;

Fig. 2 is a side elevational view of the basketball goal of Fig. 1, the dot-dash lines of the backboard and hasket showing the same in lowered position;

Fig. 3 is a cross-sectional view on line 3-3 of Fig. 1, showing an internally located operating mechanism;

Fig. 4 is a sectional view on line 4-4 of Fig. 3, showing the essentials of the mechanical operating mechanism; and

Fig. 5 is a top plane view of the goal of Fig. l.

The basketball goal of the invention consists generally of a base 10, a standard 12, a backboard 14, and a basket 15 attached to the backboard. Herein the base is sufliciently large to afford a stable support for the standard 12 and the backboard 14, making allowance for the impact of the basketball against the backboard, as is common during the course of a game. Preferably, the base 10 is so shaped that the front perimeter does not extend forwardly beyond the vertical plane of the basket.

The standard 12 consists essentially of a lower tubular 2,986,395 Patented a 1??! member 16 and an upper tubular member 18 which has an external diameter sufficiently smaller than the internal diameter of the lower tubular member 16 to permit telescopic movement of the two members in respect to each other. The base 10 has an internally threaded collar 20 extending upwardly therefrom and the lower tubular member 16 may be threaded at its lower end for engagement of its threads with the threads of the tubular collar 20.

The backboard 14 is attached to the upper end of the upper tubular member 18 by means of forwardly extending braces which support the backboard in spaced relation to the standard 12. These braces are best shown in Figs. 2 and 5. A pair of horizontal braces 22 and 24 are bolted to the backboard at opposite edges and near the top edge of the backboard. These braces converge in a rearward direction to the upper tubular member 18 where they are curved in an arc corresponding to the curvature of the upper tubular member 18 to provide a substantial supporting surface. Suitable fastening means, such as bolts 26 firmly connect the curved rear ends of the braces 22 and 24, to the upper tubular member 18. A third brace 28 is connected between the backboard and the upper tubular member 18 such that the brace 28 afiords support to the backboard at a point directly behind the basket 15. The basket 15 has a bracket 32 by which the same is bolted to the face of the backboard.

The screw threaded connection between the base 10 and the standard 12, and the bolt and nut connection of the braces 22, 24, 28 and 32 makes it possible to gather the elements into a conveniently compact package for transportation and delivery, the erection of the goal at the ultimate point of use being a simple operation.

A standard basketball goal disposes the rim of the basket at a 10 foot elevation from the playing surface. This is the position of the goal shown in Fig. 1. This invention contemplates an arrangement by which the upper tubular member 18 can be telescoped into the lower tubular member 16 a distance of at least 3 feet whereby the rim of the basket 15 can be lowered to an elevation of 7 feet above the playing surface. It is contemplated that this range of adjustment will be suflicient to accommodate the height of the basket to all possible playing groups.

Quick and easy adjustment of the basket height is accomplished herein by a simple mechanical arrangement which can be safely operated by players of any age. To this end, all of the operating mechanism is disposed within the standard 12, as shown in Figs. 3 and 4.

The upper tubular standard 18 has pairs of diametrical ly opposite slots 34 and 36. The slots are parallel and extend through the wall of the upper tubular member 18 in an axial direction for a distance of 3 feet measured near the lower end of the upper tubular member 18. The slots 34 and 36 accommodate opposite ends of spider plates 38 and 40 which extend through the slots 34 and 36 and are fixed at their ends to the inner face of the lower tubular member 16. The spider plates 38 and 40 provide a mounting for a gear train by which the upper tubular member 18 can be raised or lowered. An axial rack 42 is fixed to the inner face of the upper tubular member 18 in the area between the first pair of slots 34 and a second axial rack 44 is fixed to the inner face of the tubular member 18 in the area between the slots 36. The racks 42 and 44 are preferably somewhat longer than the pairs of slots 34 and 36 and the teeth thereof extend inwardly toward the axis of the standard.

-A pair of apertures 41 and 43 are preferably formed in the members 16 and 18 to facilitate insertion and location of the spider plates 38 and 40. Accordingly, an aperture 41 is formed in the wall of the upper tubular c eeses member, 18. which is adapted to register with a similar aperture 43 in the lower tubular member 16. The apertures 41 and 43 are so located along the length of the members 16' and; 18 that they register, witheach-other when: the; upper member 18- is;telescoped into the lower member;i6. With the apertures 41-,and Bin-registration thespider plates 38 and-40cm beinserted intotheir ultimate position within the standard and fixed in suchpositionby any suitable means. The aperture -43-in:-the lower tubular member is preferably covered by a closure plate 45 afterthe parts have been assembled'as described.

lournaled for rotation in the spider plates 38 and is a gear train adapted to operate the racks 42* and 44 to either extend orretractthe standard, Manualpower: is applied to rotate a gear 46 in either direction. Such rotation is vtransmitted toa pinion 48 which operates in contact with the teeth of therack; 44. Motion of the gear 46 is also transmitted to an idler pinion 50 whichdrives a pinion 52 that operates in contact with, the, teeth of the rack 42. Thus, if the gear 46 is rotated ina clockwisedirectlon, as viewed in Fig. 4, the pinion 48 will be driven in a counterclockwise direction to drive the rack 44 upwartlly. At thesame time, the pinion 52 will be driven in a. clockwise direction todrive therack 42in the same direction, i.e., upwardly. The reverse is true-when the gear 46 is rotated in a counterclockwise direction.

The gear 46 is mounted on an elongated hub 54 which passes through the spider plate 40 and extends outwardly into a hollow hub 56 formed in the wall of the lower tubular member 16. The presence of the hub 54 necessitates slotting the Wall of the upper tubular member 18 in an axial direction to provide a clearance space 58 for the hub 54. The clearance space 58 extends axially along the upper tubular member 18 for a distance corresponding to the length of the slots 34 and 36.

The gear hub 54 has a pin-receivingslot 60 for'receiving a pin 62 at the inner end of a crank 64 which'can be inserted through the hollow hub 56 and into the hub 54 for rotating the gear 46. To avoid dangerous protuberances, the crank 64 is made removable such that when the standard has been adjusted to a desired height, the crank 64 can be removed to leave a substantially smooth surface at the rear of the standard.

If the gear train is composed of a combination ofspur gears, the standard will maintain any given adjusted position despite vibration resulting from impact of the ball against the backboard and basket. However, to insure maintenance of an adjusted position of the standard, the gear hub 54 has a plurality of radial sockets 66 formed therein at circumferentially spaced points. The sockets 66 are adapted to register with an aperture 68 formed through the upper wall of the hollow hub 56 such that a pin 70, as shown in Fig. 2, may be passed through the aperture 68 and into one of the sockets 66 to prevent the gear-hub 58 from rotation after an adjusted position of the standard has been attained.

In order to facilitate adjusting the height of thebasket 15, the outer face of the upper tubular member is preferably marked with graduations 72 which may. be at 6 inch intervals throughout the permissible range of adjustment.

To render the goal portable, it is contemplatedthat the base, standard and backboard be made of light material, such as aluminum. Furthermore, the backboard-may be rendered wind resistant by perforating the same throughoutits face area such as by perforations 74.

In order to render the. goal more portable, it is con templated that a set of rollers 74 and a caster wheel 76 of'a well known retractable type may be provided in the base 10. The form of the. invention shown herein is adapted for both outdoor and indoor use. If it is desired to make a more or less permanent installation, as for example, by locating the standard 12 in a holding socket extending below a playing surface or by fixing it in concrete in an outdoor installation, for example, the base 10 will not be employed but the lower tubular member 16 will be made longer to permit such installation without altering the standard elevation: of the basket above the playing surface.

Having thus described my invention, what I claim as new therein anddesire to secure .by.Letters Patent is:

1. In a basketball goal, a telescopic standard consisting of a lower tubular section and an upper tubular section telescopically containedin.saiddower, tubular section, a first pair of spaced axial slots in the wall of said upper tubular section, a second pair of spaced axial slots in the wall of said upper tubular section at points in the diameter thereof which are respectively opposite the slots of said first pair, a backboard and basket fixed to the outer endpf said upper tubular section, a plate extendingthroughthe oppositely disposed slots of each'of saidpair of. slots, the opposite ends of said plates being fixed to said lower tubular section whereby said tubular sections aremaintained against relative rotation, means for adjusting the height of said backboard and basket bytelescopically adjusting the length of said standard comprising a gear train mounted onsaid plates, a rack fixed to the inner face of saidupper tubular. section between each of said pair of slots, said gear train having a drive pinion in engagement with each of saidracksand a gear for rotating saiddrive pinions, a hub for rotating said gear locatedwholly within said standard, and an aperture in a face of said lower tubular section whereby a removable operating crank may he engaged with said hub for turning saidv gear to telesope said sections in respect to each other.

2. In a basketball goal, a telescopic standard consisting of a lower tubular section and an upper tubular section telescopically contained in said lower tubular section, a first pair of spaced axial slotsinthe walls of saidtubular section, a second pair of spaced axial slots in the wall of said upper tubular section at points in the diameter thereof which are respectively opposite the slots of said first pair, a backboard and basket fixed to the outer end of said upper tubular section, a plate extending through the oppositely disposed slots of each of said pair of slots, the opposite ends of said plates being fixed to said lower tubular section whereby said tubular sections are maintained against relative rotation, meansfor adjusting the height of said backboard and basket by telescopically. adjusting the length of said standard comprisinga gear'train mounted on said plates, a rack fixed to the inner face of said upper tubular section between each of said pair. of slots, said gear train having a drive pinion in engagement with each of said racks and a gearfor rotating. said. drive pinions, a hub for rotating said gear located wholly within said standard, an aperture in a face of said lower tubular section whereby a removable operating crank may be engaged with said hub for turning said gear to telescope said sections in respect to each other, and means for locking said hub to said lower tubular section to maintain. said gear against rotation.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,128,705 Medart Feb. 16, 1915 1,594,475 Smith Aug. 3, 1926 1,737,108 Craig Nov. 26, 1929 2,379,572 Gibson July 3, 1945 2,765,201 Phillips Oct. 2, 1956 2,794,612 Clifton June 4; 1-957 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE CERTIFICATE" OF CORRECTION Patent No 2 986,395 May 30 1961 Harry Sheftel It is hereby certified that error appears in the above numbered patent requiring correction and that the said Letters Patentv should read as corrected below.

Column 4 line 39 for walls of said tubular read wall of said upper tubular Signed and sealed this 24th day of October 19610 (SEAL) Attest:

ERNEST W. SWIDER DAVID L. LADD Attesting Officer Commissioner of Patents USCOMM-DC-

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1128705 *May 19, 1914Feb 16, 1915Fred Medart Mfg CompanyVaulting-standard.
US1594475 *Mar 23, 1926Aug 3, 1926Smith Frank ERoof-supporting mechanism
US1737108 *Mar 23, 1927Nov 26, 1929Craig Burnie JAthletic standard
US2379572 *Jul 9, 1943Jul 3, 1945Gerald A GibsonPortable basketball goal
US2765201 *Mar 16, 1953Oct 2, 1956Phillips Clay ECeiling jacks
US2794612 *Mar 29, 1954Jun 4, 1957Ernest Clifton LeymanPortable camera stand
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3329427 *Jan 16, 1964Jul 4, 1967Darrell W BearsonAdjustable basketball goal
US3427025 *Jan 27, 1964Feb 11, 1969Elzie H ProcterVertically adjustable basketball goal
US3650530 *Apr 11, 1969Mar 21, 1972Emmett J GantzHeight adjustable basketball hoop and punching rack
US4260154 *Feb 26, 1979Apr 7, 1981Balbastro Jose DMethod of playing a ball game
US4412679 *May 15, 1981Nov 1, 1983Mahoney Elmo JFoldable basketball goal means
US4465277 *Apr 27, 1979Aug 14, 1984Dunk King Inc.Basketball goal structure
US4512568 *Apr 4, 1983Apr 23, 1985Robert ServadioPunching bag rebound adjuster
US4533138 *Jun 1, 1982Aug 6, 1985Robert L. WrightMultiple sport training device
US4643422 *Mar 15, 1985Feb 17, 1987Cramblett Jon JBasketball backboard adjuster
US4793611 *Sep 10, 1986Dec 27, 1988Spang & CompanyAdjustable height toy basketball goal
US4798381 *Jul 6, 1987Jan 17, 1989Harvard Sports, Inc.Basketball goal height adjustment apparatus
US4798490 *Jun 2, 1987Jan 17, 1989Fuji Kagokushi Kogyo Co.Method for using and reusing correction tape assembly
US4951944 *Mar 27, 1989Aug 28, 1990Morgan William KAdjustable basketball goal
US5050866 *Aug 18, 1989Sep 24, 1991Fucci John PPunching bag support device
US5106084 *Jan 30, 1990Apr 21, 1992Schutt Manufacturing Company, Inc.Breakaway basketball rim
US5133547 *Jan 22, 1991Jul 28, 1992Jayfro CorporationSelf-adjusting basketball goal
US5156395 *Dec 20, 1991Oct 20, 1992Smith Philip JAdjustable basketball goal
US5209713 *Jun 25, 1990May 11, 1993Instructional Fitness Programs, Inc.Method and apparatus for use in enhancing explosive leg power
US5417631 *Apr 28, 1993May 23, 1995Instructional Fitness Programs, Inc.Method for use in enhancing explosive leg power
US5462269 *Mar 21, 1994Oct 31, 1995Porter Athletic Equipment CompanyAdjustable backboard assembly with drive lock
US5503390 *May 27, 1992Apr 2, 1996Hall; Timothy D.Adjustable basketball backboard support system
US5540429 *Dec 30, 1993Jul 30, 1996Icon Health & Fitness, Inc.Adjustable height basketball standard with telescoping tubes
US5632480 *Nov 14, 1994May 27, 1997Huffy CorporationBasketball goal support having removable ballast and continuously adjustable pole
US5634872 *May 17, 1995Jun 3, 1997Instructional Fitness Programs, Inc.Apparatus for use in enhancing explosive leg power
US5704900 *Oct 20, 1995Jan 6, 1998Minnesota Scientific, Inc.Method and apparatus for peritoneal distension
US5720679 *Jul 30, 1992Feb 24, 1998Porter Athletic Equipment CompanyAdjustable basketball backboard support system
US5881537 *May 21, 1998Mar 16, 1999Huffy CorporationMethod of packing a basketball goal support system
US5916047 *Jan 31, 1996Jun 29, 1999Huffy CorporationPortable basketball goal support system with separate ballast tank
US5980400 *Sep 16, 1996Nov 9, 1999Huffy CorporationCompression molded basketball components with inmold graphics
US5983602 *Jun 15, 1998Nov 16, 1999Huffy CorporationMethod of packing a portable basketball system
US5984811 *Jun 3, 1998Nov 16, 1999Taylor; BryceAdjustable basketball standard
US6001034 *Nov 6, 1997Dec 14, 1999Huffy CorporationBasketball backboard support pole
US6053825 *Mar 5, 1997Apr 25, 2000Huffy CorporationPortable basketball system having dual ballast tanks movable between compact and expanded positions
US6283878Mar 11, 1999Sep 4, 2001Huffy CorporationAdjustable height basketball apparatus
US6575853 *Mar 28, 2000Jun 10, 2003O'neill RaymondPortable beach basketball system
US6824481Dec 16, 2002Nov 30, 2004Lifetime Products, Inc.Impact transmitting strike plate for a basketball goal assembly
US7044867Nov 15, 2004May 16, 2006Lifetime Products, Inc.Portable basketball system
US7118500Aug 26, 2003Oct 10, 2006Lifetime Products, Inc.Portable basketball system
US7219865Mar 18, 2003May 22, 2007Russell CorporationRollable sports base
US7243892 *Jan 2, 2004Jul 17, 2007Csav, Inc.Articulated mount
US7288034 *Mar 26, 2005Oct 30, 2007Danny WoodardAdjustable height, self-propelled basketball goal support
US7331883Sep 27, 2005Feb 19, 2008Russell CorporationSpinning nut basketball elevator system
US7335119Sep 29, 2005Feb 26, 2008Russell CorporationRatchet elevator system
US7431672May 15, 2006Oct 7, 2008Lifetime Products, Inc.Portable basketball system
US8167745 *Oct 18, 2002May 1, 2012TrueBounce, Inc.Polymer basketball backboard
WO2001072386A1 *Mar 28, 2001Oct 4, 2001Neill Raymond J Jr OTransportable basketball system having wind-transmissive backboard structure and sand-anchorable post assembly
Classifications
U.S. Classification473/483, 248/161, 482/90, 254/95
International ClassificationA63B71/02, A63B63/08
Cooperative ClassificationA63B2071/025, A63B2225/093, A63B63/083
European ClassificationA63B63/08B