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Publication numberUS2986916 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 6, 1961
Filing dateSep 16, 1960
Priority dateSep 16, 1960
Publication numberUS 2986916 A, US 2986916A, US-A-2986916, US2986916 A, US2986916A
InventorsJohn Bochan
Original AssigneeGen Electric
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Vertical axis laundry machine
US 2986916 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 6, 1961 oc 2,986,916

VERTICAL AXIS LAUNDRY MACHINE Filed Sept. 16, 1960 INVENTOR. J'OHN BOCHAN BYw/oi/W HlS ATTORNEY nite States atent 2,986,916 VERTICAL AXIS LAUNDRY MACHINE John Bochan, Louisville, Ky., assignor to General Electric Company, a corporation of New York Filed Sept. 16, 1960, Ser. No. 56,380 11 Claims. (Cl. 68-19) This invention relates to vertical axis laundry machines, and more particularly to such machines which have an operation suitable not only for the washing and centrifuging of clothes but also for the heat drying thereof.

While vertical axis washing machines are well known and commercially available, the heat drying of clothes has to date been effected by means of machines which have a container rotating on a non-vertical axis so that the rotation of the container causes a tumbling movement of the clothes. While such machines have been found to be effective and useful, they present the disadvantage that a top loading o peningthe most convenient for an operatorcannot be used in as simple a fashion as is possible with vertical axis washing machines. In addition, there is the factor that, where the usual approach is taken by a manufacturer of manufacturing top loading vertical axis washers and front loading dryers, the expense of manufacture of washers and dryers in the same factory becomes greater because there can be little standardization between the parts of the two machines.

A further point of importance is that, in those machines which do not have special additional structures provided for the adding of detergent, bleach, and the like (as is true on most less expensive models), a top loading machine is far superior to a front loading machine: in a top loading machine, it is merely necessary to raise the lid and introduce the treating agent. This can be done without interrupting the operation of the machine, whereas the opening of the door on a horizontal axis machine necessarily involves stopping the operation of the machine while the treating agent is being added. For reasons such as the foregoing, it is a main objective of my invention to provide a vertical axis washing machine of the type in wlL'ch a washing operation and a heat drying operation may both be provided.

It is a further more specific object of my invention to provide a machine in which the tumbling, flexing, and impacting of the clothes is effected by continually spinning them out of an inner container by centrifugal force and providing guide means to guide the clothes and washing fluid back into the inner container for a repetition of the cycle.

Another specific object of my invention is to provide a vertical axis washing machine in which the movement of the clothes during a drying operation is effected in substantially the same manner as that set forth above in connection with the washing operation.

Yet a further specific object of my invention is provision of a vertical axis washing and drying machine wherein the clothes container receptacle is so formed that during its rotation it acts as an air moving impeller so that a separate impeller for this purpose is not necessary.

In one aspect of my invention I provide a vertical axis laundry machine in which the clothes containing basket is formed as an inverted cone open at its top. The basket is surrounded by a tub, and both are rotatably mounted. The tub extends above and inwardly over the basket so that, when the tub is stationary and the basket is rotating, the tub guides clothes and liquid flung from the basket inwardly back over the basket so that they fall therewithin and go through the cycle again. In addition, means are provided for holding the tub stationary at suitable times during rotation of the basket. The tub has openings formed in it so that removal of liquid from the basket ice ' a sequence in the conventional manner so that it is operative or not operative and so that, consequently, the tub either rotates with the basket or remains stationary about the rotating basket. Because the clothes and washing liquid are flung back and over into the basket when the tub is stationary, the machine provides a washing operation during rotation of the basket alone. When the basket and tub rotate together a centrifugal extraction operation is provided by virtue of the centrifugal force acting on the liquid in the clothes to force that liquid through the openings so that it may be drained.

In addition to the Washing and centrifuging action thus obtained I provide a forced air drying system by forming vanes on the outside Wall of the clothes basket so that they pump air up between the basket and the tub. The air thus comes up over the edge of the basket and passes into contact with the clothes being flung out of the rotating basket and guided back into it by the stationary tub. Of course, suitable means for heating the air may be provided, and this may be done either in an open air cycle where the air is merely brought in, heated, and then discharged, or in a closed air cycle where the air is dehumidified after contacting the clothes and is then reheated and passed through the clothes once again. In connection with the use of the machine for drying purposes, there is no need for the tub to be rotatable; thus, where drying is to be the exclusive function of a machine, the tub need not be rotatably mounted.

The novel features which are believed to be characteristic of my invention are set forth with particularity in the appended claims. My invention, however, both as to its organization and method of operation, may best be understood by reference to the following description taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawing.

In the drawing, FIGURE 1 is a side elevational view, partly in cross section, of my improved laundry machine; and

FIGURE 2 is a fragmentary view in perspective of a part of the machine of FIGURE 1.

Referring now to FIGURE 1, I have shown therein a laundry machine 1 which is provided with an outer cabinet 2. Cabinet 2 gives a desirable appearance to the machine while at the same time providing a support (as will be further explained) for the operative parts of the machine. Cabinet 2 may, if desired, be secured on a base 3; in its top surface 4 the cabinet has an access opening 5 adapted to be closed by a lid 6 which may be opened by an operator in any suitable manner to gain access to the interior of the machine.

Secured to the sides of cabinet 2 within the cabinet is an annular steel member 7 having a central opening 8 about which are spaced a number of spring members 9 supporting a moving system, generally indicated at 10; the support is effected by engagement of the springs 9 with flange 11 of a member 12 forming part of the moving system. Member '12 forms a thrust and radial bearing for a hollow shaft member, generally indicated by the numeral 13. Shaft 13 has, at its upper end, an outwardly extending flange 14 rigidly secured to the bottom 15 of a tub member 16. Tub member 16 includes a side wall 17 which curves generally outward from its base to a point 18 somewhat above the top 19 of a clothes receptacle or basket generally indicated at 20. Basket 20 is formed generally in the shape of an inverted cone with a rounded bottom and an open top. In the present em- 'agcsac-is bodiment, the basket 20 is substantially imperforate and is supported on a base 21 secured at the end of a shaft 22 rotatably mounted within the hollow shaft 13, both shafts being rotatable on the same generally vertieal axis (excepting, of course, the conventional limited deviation from that axis permitted bysprings 9)., Shaft 22 is supported on the tub bottom 15 inrotatable relation thereto by a shoulder portion 22a. The shaft ;22 is driven through a transmission 24 by amotor 23. Transmission 24 may preferably be of the multispeed 't'ype,Icontrolled by any suitable means such as a sole- ;noid 24a so that a lowerrspeed is provided when the solenoid is deenergized and a higher speed when the solenoid is energized. Such mechanisms are conventional and commercially available, and therefore it is not deemed necessary to show the detailed structure of transmission 24. The transmission and the motor maybe supported by any suitable means such as a bracket 25 secured to and depending from member 12. v 7

With this arrangement, operation of the motor 23 causes the basket 20 to be operated through shaft '22, the rotational speed of the shaft being determined by transmission 24. It will have been observed that,. with the structure thus far described, the tub 16 is normallyfree- ;1y rotatable; means may be provided, as will be explained herebelow, to couple the basket 20 and tub lfi together so that they rotate as a unit. There are, however, times -when it is desired that the tub 16" remain stationary and for this purpose I provide a conventional brake structure, generally indicated by the numeral 26, which is controlled through a solenoid 27 so that when the solenoid is energized the brake is operated to prevent rotationof shaft 1 13 while when the solenoid is not energized shaft 13 may rotate freely. I 4

Returning now to a descriptionofthe tub 16, it int cludes a number of spaced finger-shaped indentations 28, indented toward the basket 20, which extend from about i the level of the top 19 of basket 20, or slightly below, to a point substantially above. The clearance between the top of the basket and the tub is made quite close wherever the indentations '28 occur, for a purpose to be' hereinafter described in connection with the operationfof the machine. As previously stated, the side wall 17 of tub 1 16 extends outwardly and upwardly to. point 18. From that point it extends directly upwardly as shown by; portion 29, and then inwardly as shown at portion 30, a central opening 31 being left in portion 3 alignment with opening to permit access throughopening 5 into the open top 19 of basketZt). Secured between portions 29 and 30 are a number of vanes 32 which, as best seen in FIGURE 2, have faces 33 curving inwardly in the direction of rotation as, shown by arrow A. The basket 16 also has its wall 17 provided with a number of spaced openings 34 which are used, as will be .further explained herebelow, for removal of the water from the machine at the appropriate time. Water passing through openings 34 passes into an outer stationary receptacle 35 formed by the sidewalls of cabinet 2 and .the member 7, and then into a pumping structure 36 driven by a reversible motor 37. In the direction of rotation of motor 37 which is provided during washing operations, the motor drives pump 36 in the appropriate direction to discharge liquid from the bottom of outer receptacle 35 into a conduit 38 which extends upwardly from pump 36 and terminates in a nozzle 39-positioned to direct liquid back into basket 20. When the direc tion of rotation of motor 37 is reversed, as is the case when the centrifugal extraction of liquid from the clothes is desired, it causes the pump 36 to rotate in the reverse direction to the previous rotation thereof; this in turn causes the pump to discharge into a conduit 40 adapted for discharge to a stationary tub or drain line (not shown) so that the pump is thenefieetive to drain the outer receptacle 35. While any suitable pump maybe used for these purposes, a suitable andtypical pump for the purposeis described in detail and is claimed in Patent .mmeber 4 2 'whichis secured at its lower end to portion 43 of member 7 and is secured at its upper end to the outer surface ofbearing member 12. The provision of this boot, in the conventional manner, permits relative movement between the moving system 10' and the member 7 on which it is supported without any possibilityof leakage of water where it should not be allowed. As

has already been mentioned, the machine 1 also includes components suitable to cause it to provide a drying operation aswell as the washing and centrifuging operations of a washing machine, The basket 20 is provided on its outer surface withimpellers or vanes '44 which have an air moving elfeotwhen the basket rotates, causing air to hepulled vup through openings 45 in member 15 and openings '46 in member 14, and over a sheathed-type electric heating unit 47 which may be supported in any suitable manner not shown). Thus, when the basket rotates, air is pulled up over the heater 47 and through openings 46 and 45, thereby to pass up between the basket and the tub. In order to insure this path for the circulating-air, the end 48 of member 14 may be formed as a trough with a flange 49 of basket 16 projecting down thereinto thereby to form a trap through which air will not pass but through which water will drain. ,Theair,

after it has been forced up past the top of basket 2fl,

passes through the space between the top of the basket and the tub, and through, the opening 31. The air then passesthrough a channel 49a formed between the cabinet top 4 and the.top 3t) of basket 16, down through a channel ,formed' between the side 29 of basket 16 and the sides of the cabinet, and then over suitable air dehumidification means generally shown at 51 as consisting of cold water sprays which condense the moisture out of the air.

In the conventional manner, the dehumidifying means may be in the-form of valves and conduits providing a ,small flow of water in the form of a spray so as to con- 4 densefthe; moisture out of the air passing down through channeI Sl Itwill thus be seen that the air, when it passes out of channel 50, must pass through the spray of water from valves 51 so as to be cooled sufficiently for moisture to'condense out of it, and then will pass down and over/the heating element 47 once again so as to be heated. Thus, warm, dry air is continually pro vided to contact clothes at the outer edge of basket 20 in the closed recirculation system, as will be fully discussed when the operation of the machine is described herebelow.

' It will be understood thatmachine 1 is provided with the conventionalsequence control mechanism which may be housed in a raised section 52 provided at the back of the machine. The sequence control mechanism is, in this 7 case, indicated by the part shown in phantom outline by thenumeral 53 it being understood that any conventional sequence control mechanism capable of opening and closing switches in a predetermined sequence, and

of being preset by' a manualmember 54, may be used, and that suchitems are commonly available in a variety of forms. p w

I I-Iaving described the various components of my ime proved machine 1,, the operation thereof effective to provide washing, contrifuging, and drying, will now be explained. When a washing operationis to" be provided, "thesequence' "control mechanism causes motor 23"tobe through an inlet 55, it being understood that the hydraulic inlet system of the machine may be of the conventionally provided type and is therefore not further described herein. It will further be understood that the energization of the inlet valves is provided until a suitable amount of water of the desired temperature has entered the basket 20. Also, of course, at this time any desired treating agents such as detergent may be inserted through opening into basket 20.

The rotation of basket 20 by motor 23 causes clothes :and liquid in basket 20' to be moved by centrifugal force up the sloping walls of the basket, the clothes finally sliding up over the top of the basket against the wall 17 of tub 16 in the vicinity of finger projections 28.

As the clothes slide up over the top of the basket 20, they are impacted upon the vanes 32 formed in the tub 16. In addition to providing the impact, which is beneficial in effecting a desirable mechanical washing action, the surface 33 of each vane 32 is formed that it tends to direct the clothes inwardly toward the center of the basket 20. Due to the fact that the tub 16 is stationary, the clothes are then directed by the vanes inwardly so that they then fall down within the basket 29 and receive a further impact. The mechanical washing action, then,

consists essentially of causing the washing liquid and the clothes to be flung into impact with the vanes 32. and then to be guided by the vanes 32 back down into the basket 29 for a further impact therein.

It will be understood that, because of the direction of movement of the clothes, there is very little tendency for any of the clothes to wedge themselves or fall between the basket and the wall 17 of tub 16. However, in order to further insure this result, fingers 23 have been found most beneficial. Fingers 28 tend to pick up the clothes as they pass over the top edge of basket 20, helping to guide them upwardly into impact with the vanes 32. A further item acting to prevent any wedging of the clothes is the upward flow of air around the outside of basket 20 created by impellers or vanes 44 during rotation of the basket 20. This air moves upwardly around the basket tending to push out any clothes which might try to move down into a wedged position between the basket and the tub.

The washing action described continues for any desired period of time which may, for instance, be on the order of minutes. During this period of time the pump 36 is, as stated, operated in the direction to cause liquid passing into receptacle 35 to be guided into conduit 38 back into basket 20. This is desirable since a certain amount of liquid will be lost, both by passing out through openings 34 and by dripping down wall 17 of tu'b '16 and out through openings 45, through the trough 48, and down to the bottom of receptacle 35. By promptly recirculating this water back into basket 20, the fact that a certain amount of water will escape from the tub and basket system becomes immaterial.

It is conventional, at the end of the Washing operation, to cause the liquid in the clothes to be centrifugally extracted from the clothes in order to make the rinsing operation more effective. In order to effect this centrifuging operation, at least two changes from the previous washing operation, and preferably three, are provided. First, the brake 26 is released by deener-gization of solenoid 2-7; and second, the direction of rotation of motor 37 is reversed so that pump 36, instead of pump ing liquid from the bottom of receptacle 35 up through conduit 38, will pump it out through conduit 40 to drain. The release of brake 26 means that there is no longer any force except very minor frictional forces stopping the tub 16 from rotating. As a result of this, the continual impact of clothes on the vanes 32 as they are flung up out of the rotating basket 20 will cause the tub 16 to start to rotate with the basket 20. p

In this manner, the tub will gradually come up to the same speed as the basket 26, with the clothes eventually being plastered about the upper and outer edge of basket 20, it being contemplated that the clothes will overlap the edge of the basket 20 so that they will effectively couple the basket and tub together for joint rotation. As a result of this rotation centrifugal force acts on the liquid in the clothes causing it to pass out through openings 34 into receptacle 35 where the pump 36 removes the liquid to drain.

The third change mentioned above as desirable for the centrifuging operation is the energization of solenoid 24a to cause transmission 24 to provide a higher speed. While acceptacle results may be obtained with a single speed transmission, it is preferred to provide, generally, a higher speed for centrifuging than for washing. In addition, the type of washing action may be varied between heavy and light by means of a multi-speed transmission, the impact becoming greater (and therefore the washing action heavier) as the speed is increased.

The centrifuging action continues for an appropriate period of time which may, for instance, be on the order of 5 minutes. At the end of this operation a rinse step is provided in substantially the same manner as the washing step, that is, by reversing the direction of rotation of pump 36 so that recirculation is again provided and by causing braking of the tub '16 by energization of solenoid 27. After the rinsing, a suitable centrifuging operation is again provided in the same manner as before. At the end of this last centrifuging operation the brake is again applied to stop the rotation of the tub 16.

However, the rotation of pump 36 is continued in the direction effective for draining and, in addition, for the first time heating element 47 is energized and valves 51 are turned on to provide a spray condensing effect. The continued rotation of basket 20 causes the clothes to continue their movement outwardly and upwardly into contact with vanes 32 and then back into the center of the basket 20. This continued rotation also continues to cause the movement of air previously mentioned so that the air passes in sequence over the heater 47 and then through openings 46 and 45, up between basket 2%) and the imperforate part of wall 17 between openings 34 and 45, and then through the clothes as they are being fiung outwardly from the basket, this contact of the heated air with the clothes serving to vaporize moisture from the clothes and thereby dry them.

After thus contacting the clothes, the air passes up through opening 31 and then through channels 49a and 50 and back downwardly and past the sprays emanating from condenser valves 51, a small portion of the air possibly taking the shorter path through openings 34. As the moist heated air passes through the spray it is cooled below its saturation point to cause condensation of moisture out of the air. The air then passes back over heater 4'7, and so forth to repeat the cycle and continue the drying action. Because of the configuration of trough 48 and flange 49, a water seal is provided at that point to prevent any bypassing of the heating element by the air so that all the air continually passes over the heating element to obtain maximum elfectiveness.

This heating operation may continue, either for a preset time or until the clothes are dry depending upon whether a conventional timed sequence or an automatic sequence is desired (both types being well known and provided on commercially available machines). Thus, in the vertical machine 1, a complete washing, centrifuging and drying action is provided for the clothes inserted thereinto. It is to be noted that while the motion of the clothes is essentially the same during washing and drying,

7 two entirely"diflei ent purposesare served by this'same mbtio'n. In washing, the object'is to impact the-clothes on the'fixed vanes 32 and thendmpactthem by causing them to'fall i'nt'o the basket 29, the impacts having the result of flexing them and providing a mechanical washing action. However, insofar as drying is concerned the object as to the clothes is to tumble them, that is, to continually' move the clothes so that difierent areas of'them are exposed to the stream of air. This has been found necessary for efiective drying of the clothes. The type of movement described above achieves both ends. Thus, the apparatus is'suitable both-for washing and for drying 'so'that the same basic structure may be provided in a vertical axis machine either for a combination washing and drying machine such as the one described, or simply "a washing machine (by elimination'of the condensing valves and the heatingstructure), or for simply a drying machine (by elimination of 'the hydraulic inlet structure and by making the tub 16 permanently secured against rotation).

It will be recognized that my basically-novel laundry machine provides many advantages both as a result of structnre'described and by virtue of the fact that many .additional structuralfeatures can be added as desired.

For instance, the arrangement described makes the precise' amount of water used in the washing operation a non-critical factor as opposed to most types of washing machines in use today Where the amount of water is quite critical. It will further be observed that a very simple transmission mechanism may be provided where unidirec- 'tional rotation such as that described is desired as opposed to the eccentric type of oscillation presently provided on most vertical axis machines. In this connection, it will be understood that while a uni-directional .rotation has been set forth as the simplest and most desirable structure, it is readily conceivable that, for instance, inthe washing part of the cycle the direction of .rotationmight be reversed every few revolutions if so desired without adverse effect.

It will further be observed that air circulation is obtained and that this has the dual efiect of helping to prevent wedging of clothes during washing and in addition the movement of air is obtained during drying without the need for a separate impeller as has been necessary up until the present time where forced air circulation was provided. Also, a simple construction with virtually no "ducting is provided, the passage for air during drying being provided by the shape of the receptacle itself. The addition of other features, such as a heater for the water during the wash cycle may readily be made to'my construction, and it will be understood that such features fall within the scope of my invention although eliminated from the drawing and description for purposes of simplicity and clarity in illustrating the basic invention.

, While in accordance with the patent statutes I have described What at present is considered to be a preferred embodiment of my invention, it will be obvious to those skilled in the artthat various changes and modifications, such as for instance (but not exclusively) those suggested above, may be made therein without departing from the invention and I therefore aim in the appended claims to cover all such changes and modifications as fall within the true spirit and scope of my invention.

H What I claim as new and desire to secure by letters Patent of the United States is:

1. A vertical axis laundry machine comprising: a basket formed as an inverted cone open at its top; a tub surrounding said basket and extending above and over said basket; means for rotating said basket and tub together at a speed sufiicient to fling clothes and liquid outwardly over the edge of said basket; means for hoiding'said tub stationary during rotation of said basket, said tub being formed to guide clothes and liquid inwardly over said basket when said tub is stationary and said basket is"rdtating;said tub having openings formed therein for removal of liquid -from "said basketduring rotation of said basket and tub together; means for-receiving and draining liquid 'passed through said openings during rotation of said basket and tub together; and means-controlling said tub holding means, said machine. providing awashing operation duringrotation of saidbasket alone and providing a centrifugal extraction operation during rotation of said basket and tub together.

2. The apparatus defined in claim 1 wherein-said basket is substantially imperforate.

3. The apparatus defined in claim 1 wherein said tub includes vanes positioned above said basket, said vanes being arranged to guide clothes and liquid spunup out of said basket inwardly over said basket when said tub is held stationary and said basket is rotating.

4. The apparatus defined in claim 1 wherein said basket is substantially imperforate and said tub has openings formed therein'adjacent its bottom and adjacent the top of said basket.

5. The apparatus defined in claim 1 wherein generally slanting finger-shaped indentations are formed in said tub extending from the top of said basket upwardly, said indentations being formed toward said basket.

6. The apparatus defined in claim 1 wherein said means for rotating said basket and tub is multi-speed in character, and means are provided for selectively controlling the speed at which said rotating means operates said basket and said tub.

7. A vertical axis laundry machine comprising: a substantially imperforatebasket formed as an inverted cone open atits top; a tub surrounding said basket and extending above and inwardly over said basket; means for rotating said basket and tub together at a speed sufiicient to fling clothes and liquid outwardly over the edge of said basket; means for holding said tub stationary during rotation of said basket; said tub including vanes for guiding clothes and liquid flung up out of said basket inwardly over said basket when said tub is stationary and said basket is rotating; said tub having openings formed therein adjacent its bottom and adjacent the top of said basket for removal of water; a stationary outer receptacle surrounding said tub in liquid-receiving relation thereto; meansfor recirculating liquid from said receptacle back into said basket; drain means connected to said receptacle; and means controlling said tub holding means, said machine providing a washing operation during rotation of said basket alone when said recirculating means is operating and providing a centrifugal extraction operation during rotation of said basket and tub together when said drain means is operating.

8. The apparatus defined in claim 7 wherein said'tub has a substantially imperforate section between its top and bottom openings defining with said basket a channel, said basket has air impelling vanes secured thereto for moving air upwardly through said channel when said basket rotates, and means for heating air prior to its passage through said channel.

9. A vertical axis laundry machine comprising: a substantially imperforate basket formed as an inverted con open at its top; a tub surrounding said basket and extending above and inwardly over said basket, said tub including a substantially imperforate section extending around and spaced from said basket and 'forming a channel with said basket; means for rotating said basket within said tub at a speed sufficient to fling clothes outwardly over the edge of said basket; said tub including guide vanes for guiding clothes and liquid spun up out of said basket inwardly over said basket as a result of the stationary condition of said tub; said basket having air impelling vanes formed on its outer surface in saidchannelso as to move air upwardly through said channel between said basket and said tub during rotation of said basket; and heating'means for heating air drawn up through said channel whereby heatedair passes into contact with the clothes being flungiup out of said basket.

10. A vertical axis laundry machine comprising: a substantially imperforate basket formed as an inverted cone open at its top; a tub surrounding said basket and extending above and inwardly over said basket, said tub including an imperforate section extending around said basket and forming a channel therewith; means for rotating said basket and tub together at a speed suflicient to fling clothes and liquid outwardly over the edge of said basket; means for holding said tub stationary during rotation of said basket; said tub including means for guiding clothes and liquid spun up out of said basket inwardly over said basket when said tub is stationary and said basket is rotating; said tub having openings formed therein adjacent its bottom and adjacent the top of said basket for removal of liquid; a stationary outer receptacle surrounding said tub in liquid-receiving relation thereto; means for r circulating liquid from said receptacle back into said basket; drain means connected to said receptacle; and means controlling said tub holding means; said basket having air impelling vanes 'formed on its outer surface in said channel so as to cause air to pass upwardly through said channel during rotation of said basket thereby to tend to blow clothes away from a position where they might be wedged between said basket and said tub.

11. A vertical axis laundry machine comprising: a substantially imperforate basket formed as an inverted cone open at its top; a tub surrounding said basket and extending above and inwardly over said basket; means for rotating said tub and basket together at a speed suflicient to fling clothes and liquid outwardly over the edge of said basket; means for holding said tub stationary during rotation of said basket; said tub including vanes for guiding clothes and liquid flung up out of said basket inwardly over said basket when said tub is stationary and said basket is rotating; said tub having openings formed therein adjacent its bottom, and having a substantially imper: forate section extending around said basket in spaced relation thereto thereby to form a channel with said basket, said basket having air moving vanes formed on its outer surfaces and arranged to move air upwardly through said openings and said channel during rotation of said basket; an outer cabinet surrounding the sides and top of said tub in spaced relation thereto and forming with the top and sides of said tub outer channel means through which air may pass from the top of said tub back to the bottom thereof, means for condensing moisture out of the air positioned intermediate said outer channel means and said openings; means downstream of said condensing means for heating the air after it has been dehumidified by said condensing means; and drain means for removing condensed moisture.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 2,273,749 Burkolt Feb. 17, 1942 2,321,641 Anderson June 15, 1943 2,630,001 Criner Mar. 3, 1953 FOREIGN PATENTS 295,380 Great Britain Jan. 17, 1942

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3114919 *Jan 6, 1961Dec 24, 1963Whirlpool CoMethod and apparatus for shaking a garment and applying cleaning liquid and drying fluid thereto
US3246837 *Mar 4, 1963Apr 19, 1966Blackstone CorpSediment ejector for automatic washing machines
US4451248 *Jul 20, 1981May 29, 1984E. I. Du Pont De Nemours And CompanyCentrifuge bowl having rotor windage limited disposed thereon
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US4631934 *Feb 12, 1986Dec 30, 1986Kabushiki Kaisha ToshibaWashing machine
US4651542 *Jun 6, 1986Mar 24, 1987Kabushiki Kaisha ToshibaWashing machine
US4711104 *Apr 9, 1986Dec 8, 1987Kabushiki Kaisha ToshibaWashing machine
US4711105 *Oct 31, 1985Dec 8, 1987Kabushiki Kaisha ToshibaWashing machine having rotary basket in washing tub
US4835994 *May 2, 1984Jun 6, 1989Kabushiki Kaisha ToshibaWashing machine
US4837883 *May 2, 1984Jun 13, 1989Kabushiki Kaisha ToshibaMethod of washing clothes using a washing machine
US5457969 *Jan 30, 1995Oct 17, 1995Roaf Industries, Inc.Top loading vertical axis washing/drying machine
US5950459 *Oct 30, 1997Sep 14, 1999Sharp Kabushiki KaishaElectric washing machine including washing tank and agitator which rotate in opposite directions
US7117612Mar 31, 2005Oct 10, 2006American Dryer Corp.Method for spin drying a clothes basket in a combination washer/dryer
US7376997 *Jan 16, 2002May 27, 2008Lg Electronics Inc.Rinse control method for washing machine
US8573009Aug 15, 2011Nov 5, 2013General Electric CompanyBasket assembly with fluid vanes for a steam-augmented washing machine
US20040045097 *Jan 16, 2002Mar 11, 2004Jong-Ho KimRinse control method for washing machine
US20040221474 *May 5, 2003Nov 11, 2004Dennis SlutskyCombination washer/dryer having common heat source
US20050166420 *Mar 31, 2005Aug 4, 2005American Dryer Corp.Combination washer/dryer having a common heat source
US20120124755 *May 24, 2012General Electric CompanyBasket wash
EP2025791A1Jul 21, 2008Feb 18, 2009Avantec Costruzioni Meccaniche SrlApparatus for dyeing and/or washing delicate garments with double basket
WO1996023925A1 *Jan 16, 1996Aug 8, 1996Roaf Industries, Inc.Top loading vertical axis washing/drying machine
WO2004098364A2 *Apr 26, 2004Nov 18, 2004American Dryer CorporationCombination washer/dryer having a common heat source
WO2004098364A3 *Apr 26, 2004Jun 16, 2005American Dryer CorpCombination washer/dryer having a common heat source
Classifications
U.S. Classification68/19.2, 68/15, 68/23.00R, 68/208, 68/171
International ClassificationD06F23/00, D06F23/04
Cooperative ClassificationD06F23/04
European ClassificationD06F23/04