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Publication numberUS2987847 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 13, 1961
Filing dateJun 24, 1959
Priority dateJun 24, 1959
Publication numberUS 2987847 A, US 2987847A, US-A-2987847, US2987847 A, US2987847A
InventorsJones Claude A
Original AssigneeJones Claude A
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Bubble blower
US 2987847 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 13, 1961 c. A. JONES 2,987,847

BUBBLE BLOWER Filed June 24, 1959 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 III INVENTOR. CLAUDE A. JONES ATTOPNQVS C. A. JONES BUBBLE BLOWER June 13, 1961 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed June 24, 1959 INVENTOR. CLAUDE A. JONES BY M i A 7 TORNEVS United States Patent 0.

2,987,847 1 BUBBLE BLOWER Claude A. Jones, 600 Mendocino Ave., Santa Rosa, Calif. Filed June 24, 1959, Ser. No. 822,524

'2 Claims. (Cl. 46-7) This invention relates generally to a bubble blowing device and more particularly to a device by which a plurality of bubbles can be formed by blowing a stream of air through an 'apertured disk which is rotated through a bubble forming solution.

In general, it is an object of the invention to improve upon the construction of such devices, particularly with respect to means permitting the user to blow into the device to thereby form a plurality of bubbles.

Itis another object of the invention to provide a bubble blowingdevice of this type whereby entering air rotates the parts and exhaustair forms the bubbles.

A iurther object of the invention is to facilitate the production of a continuous stream of accurately shaped globular bubbles by means of a device which is simple to manufacture and which can constitute an inexpensive, entertaining toy.

Other objects and advantages of the invention will be apparent from the following description and from the drawings in which:

FIGURE 1 is a view in perspective of a bubble blowing device embodying my invention;

FIGURE 2 is view in vertical section along the line 2-2 of FIGURE 1;

FIGURE 3 is a view in horizontal section along the line 3-3 of FIGURE 2;

FIGURE 4 is a view in transverse section along the line 4-4 of FIGURE 3;

FIGURE 5 is a view like FIGURE 2 of a modified form of the invention. I

FIGURE 6 is a view in vertical section along the line 6-6 of FIGURE 5; and

FIGURE 7 is a like view along the line 7-7 thereof.

Generally stated, the present invention relates to a bubble blowing device employing a casing in which an impeller and an apertured disk are mounted for simultaneous rotation, the disk being rotatable in a bubble trough. The casing has an air passage which is adapted to cause rotation of the impeller and the disk. The air passage includes an exhaust passage extending to a point adjacent the apertures of the rotatable disk. By virtue of this construction, a stream of air blown through the air passage will cause the impeller and disk to rotate and, at the same time, bubbles to be formed from films in the apertures of the disk as they are rotated in front of the exhaust passage.

The bubble blowing device illustrated in FIGURES 1 to 4 consists generally of the casing 10, which preferably is molded in two sections from a suitable material such as plastic, metal, rubber or similar material. The casing is constructed to provide an open trough or chamber 12 at one end, and an interior generally cylindrical chamber 14. The trough 12 can be enlarged adjacent its lower portion, as at 16, to accommodate a substantial quantity of a film forming solution 18. The upper lip 20 of the trough is preferably turned inwardly so as to act as a splash guard or retainer for the solution.

The casing, which preferably is of generally circular cross section, has a longitudinally extending axial passage 22 providing a bearing for a rotatable spindle 24. An apertured bubble disk 26 is mounted on the end of the spindle for rotation within the bubble trough 16. An impeller 28 is mounted on the other end of the spindle so as to be rotatable within the interior chamber 14. The spindle can further be provided with radial 2,987,847 Patented June 13, 19 61 ice projections or grommets 30 to insure a proper axial alinemen tof the disk 26 and impeller 28 within the casing.

It is a feature of my device that an axial air passage 32 is provided to facilitate rotation of the disk 26 by blowing on the impeller and, simultaneously, the formation of successive bubbles from films in the apertures 34 of the disk. As illustrated in FIGURES 2 to 4, the air passage 32 is divided into a bifurcated inlet portion including the separate passages 36 and an exhaust portion 38. The inlet passages 36 are constructed to divide a stream of air blown through the inlet .40. into separate opposed air streams. This relationship is represented by the arrows 44in FIGURE 4. These op-' positely directed air streams, impinge on diametrically opposed blades 42 of the impeller, and cause the impeller 28, shaft 24 and, disk 26 to rotate rapidly in a counter clockwise direction, as viewed in FIGURE .4. Exhaust air from the chamber 14 discharges through the passage 38 and simultaneously impinges against the outer periphery of the rotating bubble disk 26 (arrows 46). The result is that a succession of bubbles 48 forms continu-' ously, and moves away from the bubble device in the direction of the arrows 50.

The bubble device can be further provided with a convenient standard 52 which can additionally serve as a hand grip. This standard permits the device to be placed on a table or other flat surface without spilling film forming solution contained in the chamber 16.

The use of my new bubble device can be summarized as follows: A bubble solution is first placed in the chamber 16, which is filled to a height below the splash guard 20. The user then places his mouth adjacent the inlet opening 40, and blows to cause a stream of air to divide and pass through the passage 36 and against the blades 42 of the impeller. The ensuing rotation of the impeller causes a corresponding rotation of the disk 26, and at the same rate of rotation. Air leaving the impeller chamber 14 is directed through the passage 38 against the now rotating bubble disk 26, where it strikes films of soapy liquid carried by the apertures 34 of the disk. The net result is that a series of bubbles 48 are rapidly formed in a stream issuing from the device.

FIGURES 5 to 7 illustrate a modified form of the invention adapted to achieve reduced speed of rotation of the bubble disk and increased starting torque for immediate rotation. As best illustrated in FIGURE 5, the impeller 28:: is mounted on a first shaft 54 for rotation in an upper portion of the casing. The bubble disk 26a is mounted on a second shaft 56 for rotation in a lower position in the casing. An internal chamber 58 is provided to receive suitable gear means provided on the inner end of each shaft. As illustrated in FIGURE 7, the upper gear 60 secured to the impeller is substantially smaller than the gear 62 secured to the bubble disk. This relationship provides a gear reduction and a decreased speed of rotation of the bubble disk relative to the impeller. For example, very satisfactory results have been obtained with a 2 to 1 gear reduction. The resultant reduction in the rotational speed of the bubble disk 26a effects a substantial savings in the use of the bubble solution 1 8a, and consequently in the bubble producing capacity of the device.

FIGURE 6 also illustrates a gradual reduction in size of the inlet air passage, as at 64, to achieve a nozzle or a jet effect. This construction has the effect of increasing the force of the air stream adjacent the impeller blades 42a, and of increasing the starting torque im parted to the gear system and bubble disk.

In the use of the modified device, blowing on the inlet opening 40a will produce high velocity jets of air adjacent the impeller, to produce high starting torque for immediate rotation. However, rotation of the impeller V 7 i 3 will cause the bubble disk slow speed, due to the gear reduction provided by the gears 60, 62. The air leaving the impeller chamber through the passage 38a causes a stream of bubbles to be -formed as before, but at a slower more uniform rate.

To those skilled in the art to which this invention relates, many additional variationsand embodiments'and applications of the invention will suggest themselves with out departing from the spirit and scope hereof. Accordingly it should be understood that the application is not intended to be in any sense limiting. M

' I claim:

I. In a bubble blowing device, a casing provided with an interior chamber and an open trough for a film forming liquid, a spindle mounted for rotation in said casing and carrying an impeller and apertured disk, said im' peIler being positioned in said interior chamber and said disk being positioned in said trough, said casing being further provided with air passage means for causing rotation of said impeller and said disk, said passage means including inlet means for blowing air into said passage means, and exhaust means disposed adjacent said disk for blowing bubbles from films picked up by said apertured 26a to rotate at a relatively 2. In a bubble blowing device, a casing provided with an interior chamber and an open trough for a film forming liquid, a first spindle mounted for rotation in said casing and carrying an impeller, a second spindle mounted for rotation in said casing and carrying an apertured disk, said spindles being provided with meshing gears to provide a speed reduction to said apertured disk,'said impeller being positioned in said interior chamber and said disk being positioned in said trough, said casing beng further provided with air pa agc means for causing rotation of said impeller and said disk, said passage means including inlet means for blowing air into said passage means, and exhaust means disposedadjacentsaid disk for blowing bubbles from films pickedup by said apertured disk. v H

References Cited in thetile 'o f'tbis patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1 r 290,474 Riblet ec. 18,1883 1,388,232 Zsarnay s Aug. 23, 1921 2,412,732 Holman Dec. 17, 1946 2,547,825 King -a-- Apr. 3, 1951 Fisher Mar. 6, 1956

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US290474 *Jul 12, 1883Dec 18, 1883 Mechanical advertising apparatus
US1388232 *Nov 26, 1920Aug 23, 1921Abraham LewisFigure toy
US2412732 *Oct 29, 1945Dec 17, 1946Turco Products IncBubble blowing device
US2547825 *Jan 16, 1948Apr 3, 1951King Gaither JMechanical hand powered soap bubble maker
US2736988 *Jun 23, 1952Mar 6, 1956Fisher Norman AMulti bubble producing device
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3708909 *Nov 18, 1969Jan 9, 1973Winston EBubble producing toy
US3913260 *May 17, 1974Oct 21, 1975Corbett James CToy bubble generator
US4234525 *Mar 13, 1979Nov 18, 1980Piterskikh Georgy PApparatus for spraying fluid and paste-like materials
US4324063 *Oct 1, 1980Apr 13, 1982Marvin Glass & AssociatesToy motor vehicle
US4804346 *Nov 4, 1987Feb 14, 1989Sheng Lin MOpen mouth blowing bubble toy
US5269715 *Aug 27, 1992Dec 14, 1993Silveria Richard WSoap bubble making apparatus
US5643035 *Nov 13, 1995Jul 1, 1997Gerry Baby Products CompanyBubble producing device having a rotatable turbine wheel with pin members
US6186853May 27, 1999Feb 13, 2001Gene MessinaBubble maker with mechanized dipping wand
US6244463Dec 9, 1999Jun 12, 2001Oddzon, Inc.Candy dispenser with single-user-action dispensing mechanism
US6315627 *Apr 18, 2000Nov 13, 2001Placo Corporation Ltd.Bubble generating assembly
US6328286May 22, 2000Dec 11, 2001Oddzon, Inc.Apparatus for blowing streams of bubbles
US6544091 *Aug 15, 2000Apr 8, 2003Arko Development LimitedBubble generating assembly
US6659830Feb 7, 2002Dec 9, 2003Arko Development LimitedBubble generating assembly
US6969293Jan 26, 2004Nov 29, 2005Arko Development Ltd.Bubble generating assembly
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US7021986Nov 17, 2003Apr 4, 2006Arko Development LimitedBubble generating assembly
US7144291Sep 8, 2004Dec 5, 2006Arko Development LimitedBubble machine
US7172484Jan 18, 2005Feb 6, 2007Arko Development Ltd.Bubble machine
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US7223149May 13, 2005May 29, 2007Arko Development Ltd. (Hk)Bubble generating assembly
US7367861Jun 7, 2006May 6, 2008Arko Development LimitedBubble generating assembly
US7390236Jun 10, 2005Jun 24, 2008Arko Development LimitedApparatus and method for delivering bubble solution to a dipping container
US7476139Feb 14, 2006Jan 13, 2009Arko Development LimitedBubble generating assemblies
US7758397May 8, 2008Jul 20, 2010Arko Development LimitedApparatus and method for delivering bubble solution to a dipping container
US7780497Jan 31, 2007Aug 24, 2010Arko Development Ltd.Bubble machine
US7883390Feb 25, 2005Feb 8, 2011Arko Development Ltd.Bubble generating assembly
US7914359Jan 5, 2007Mar 29, 2011Arko Development LimitedBubble generating assembly
US8038500Dec 10, 2007Oct 18, 2011Arko Development LimitedBubble generating assembly
US8123584Jul 31, 2007Feb 28, 2012Arko Development LimitedBubble generating assembly
US8267736May 21, 2010Sep 18, 2012Placo Bubbles LimitedAnimal bubble assembly
US8272915Feb 15, 2008Sep 25, 2012Arko Development Ltd.Bubble generating assembly that produces vertical bubbles
US8272916Nov 14, 2008Sep 25, 2012Arko Development Ltd.Bubble generating assembly that produces vertical bubbles
EP0094532A2 *Apr 29, 1983Nov 23, 1983DULCOP INTERNATIONAL S.p.A.Toy airplane emitting bubbles of the type of soap bubbles
Classifications
U.S. Classification446/17
International ClassificationA63H33/28
Cooperative ClassificationA63H33/28
European ClassificationA63H33/28