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Publication numberUS2988091 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 13, 1961
Filing dateSep 4, 1956
Priority dateSep 4, 1956
Publication numberUS 2988091 A, US 2988091A, US-A-2988091, US2988091 A, US2988091A
InventorsLong Edward D
Original AssigneeLong S Hair Conditioner Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Mechanism for permanently conditioning hair
US 2988091 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 13, 1961 E. D. LONG MECHANISM FOR PERMANENTLY CONDITIONING HAIR Filed Sept. 4, 1956 2 Sheets-Sheet l Jadeair fjciwar A]. 0&Q9

June 13, 1961 E. D. LONG MECHANISM FOR PERMANENTLY CONDITIONING HAIR Filed Sept. 4, 1956 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 Jae/eater dwaro! efaag United States Patent 2,988,091 MECHANISM FOR PERMANENTLY CONDITIONING HAIR Edward D. Long, Jacksonville, Ill., assignor to Longs Hair Conditioner, Inc., a corporation of Illinois Filed Sept. 4, 1956, Ser. No. 607,690 Claims. (Cl. 13231) The present invention relates to the general held of hair conditioning. More specifically the invention contemplates a power driven conditioner which, when employed with differing hair solutions and techniques, can either permanently straighten kinky hair or wave straight hair.

It is well known that a hot. comb when used with certain solutions may be employed to straighten the air. Usually the hot comb is employed with a greasy type of material, and the effect of straightening rarely persists longer than two weeks. In the event the hair thus straightened is washed, it will almost immediately revert to its original form. In some instances, acids or alkalies are used in conjunction with the hot comb. Although this-may elfect a semi-straightening of the hair, acids and alkalies are injurious to the scalp and require numerous precautions in use. Also the acids and alkalies tend to discolor the hair so that it often requires dyeing after straightening. In addition, the hair is often made dry, brittle-and unmanageable by such strong solutions.

In view of the foregoing it is the general object of the present invention to provide a mechanism and solution which may be employed to permanently alter the characteristics of human hair.

A more specific object of the invention is to provide a permanent hair conditioner which is light, compact, and relatively inexpensive to construct.

Still another object of the invention is to furnish a device for permanent hair conditioning which derives its heat from friction, and utilizes the frictional elements for further conditioning the hair.

A further object of the invention is to provide a permanent hair conditioner which employs mild conditioning solutions that are safe to use on the scalp.

Further objects and advantages of the present invention will become apparent as the following description of an illustrative embodiment proceeds, taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings in which:

FIG. 1 illustrates the use of an illustrative hair conditioning machine on the human head.

FIG. 2 is a front elevation of the hair conditioning machine.

FIG. 3 is a top view of the hair conditioning machine shown in FIG. 2.

FIG. 4 is a partial exploded perspective view of the end of the hair conditioning machine.

FIG. 5 is an end view of the hair conditioning machine.

FIG. 6 is a transverse sectional view in an enlarged scale of the hair conditioning machine taken along section line 66 of FIG. 2.

FIG. 7 is a diagrammatic view illustrating how the hairs are inserted into the conditioning machine.

FIG. 8 illustrates the hair conditioning machine after the hair has been clamped in place.

FIG. 9 illustrates the use of the hair conditioning machine as the end of a strand of hair passes through it.

The invention stems from the discovery that heat generated by friction when directly applied to the hair effects a superior conditioning action both in straightening and curling, the hair, permanently. In the event that kinky or unruly hair isto be straightened, the conditioner is used with a solution. containing a major proportion of formaldehyde and a minor proportion of cold wave solu- Patented June 13, 1196.1

tion. To permanently wave or curl" the hair, a cold wave solution is employed-which may be blended with shampoo.

For. a better understanding of the invention, it will be helpful to first understand how the mechanism is'used. Thereafter the details of its construction will be more fully appreciated.

In the event that the hair is to be straightened, it is best not to wash the hair before beginning operation. It has been observed that the natural oils of the hair appears to aid in the straightening processes; At the start the operator parts off a section of the hair about 1 or 1 inches wide and four inches long. The straightening solution, the detailed composition of which will be described hereinafter, is then applied to this section of the hair. Thereafter the operator grasps a strand of hair which covers an area of scalp of about /1. inch by 1% inches. This hair is held in one hand while the conditioning machine 10is held in the other hand. The hair is then inserted in the comb 11 and conformed to the driving rod 12 in order that the heat of the driving rod impinges directly upon the'hair.

The hair is then slowly moved over the driving rod by removing the conditioning machine from the head. The speed of'feed through the conditioning machine is such that the straightening composition is observed to steam and bubble at the point of contact with the driving rod.

This action is continued with one strand of hair after another until the first section of the scalp has been treated. Thereafter another section of the scalp is parted off and the hair similarly treated. After the treatment has been concluded the hair is washed and may be set in pin curls' or conformed to the coiflure desired by the operator. The hair after treatment is permanently straightened and no further treatment is necessary until the straightened hair grows out. After treatment the hair is not only'straight but much softer and easier to manage. The hair can be washed repeatedly without reverting to its original kinky status. Microscopic examination of the hair indicates that the treated hair appears round in cross section, whereas it is rather fiat or oval shaped prior to treatment.

In the event that the straight hair is to be permanented a similar treatment is given except that the solution employed differs. Also the operator may desire to perform the' treatment on only a portion of the hair where the wave is desired. As pointed out above the hair is set: in. pin curls or other convoluted temporary curling devices after the treatment with the hair conditioner.

The conditioning machine.Referring now to the drawings, it will be seen that the hair conditioning machine 10 contemplates. a hand grip portion 15 which houses a motor (not shown) supplied through electric cord 16. A switch: 18 may be turned on and off by the operator to control the use ofthe conditioner.

The heart of the invention resides in the head 20'. As will'be-seen in FIG; 2, the head 20 contemplates a driving rod 12 which is rotated by the motor 21 through extension shaft 22. The driving rod 12 operates in conjunction with a comb 11 extending paraxially beneath the driving rod 12. A removable clamp 24 may be dropped over the driving rod 12 in operation to hold the hair. in place during treatment.

Referring now to FIG. 4, it will be seen that a block of frictional material 25 is secured against the driving rod 12 by means of a yoke 26. Normally the driving rod rotates at approximately 17,000 r.p.m. The action of. the friction block 25 against the driving rod provides the necessary heat for the operation.

Because the comb 11 may become hot when operated in. closeproximity to driving rod 12, it is providedwith means for lowering it away from the driving rod when not in use. The end of the comb is provided with a pair of teeth 28 which ride in the mounting grooves 29 in the end bearing support frame 30. A comb spring 31 engages the lower portion of the comb 1'1 and tends to hold the comb up close to the driving rod 12. The upper portion of the comb 11 rides against the end bearing 32. The bearing housing cap 33 completes the end bearing frame assembly.

The hair clamp 24, as will be seen in FIGS. 2 and 3, is a cylindrical segment proportioned to overlie the driving rod 12. A handle 34 extends from the end of the hair clamp 24. The hair clamp 24 is secured at a midportion to the inner block assembly 35 by means of clamp pivot screw 36. A spring support portion 38 extends from the clamp 24 and receives clamp spring 39. The clamp spring 39 is secured to a clamp spring support pin '40 at the lower portion of the inner bearing block assembly 35. The clamp spring 39 urges the clamp into its operative position adjacent the driving rod of the operation.

When the first strand of hair is placed in position, the clamp 24 is open as shown in FIG. 7. The mechanism is lowered to a point Where the comb 11 is in close proximity to the scalp outline 44. When the hand hold on the clamp handle 34 is released the clamp 24 then comes down on the rod 12 and clamps the strand of hair in position for treatment as shown in FIG. 8.

FIG. 9 illustrates how the clamp 24 serves to hold the strand of hair in close proximity to the drive rod 12 throughout the entire length of the strand.

Since the drive rod '12 relies for its heat on friction with the friction block 25, it will be apparent that the heat could also be induced by a reciprocatory action of the drive rod 12 incited by a concentric arm connected to the power source of the drive mechanism. Such a mechanism is contemplated by the invention but is not the preferred construction and has not been made up of what is known in the cosmetics field as a cold wave solution, plus certain trace elements. The cold wave solution is normally six to seven percent thioglycolic acid and the balance being water or any other inert ingredient. Traces of glycerine, lanolin, and tragacanth (mucilage) may also be added. These additives do not exceed one per cent each of the straightening solution but have been found to impart certain advantages in operation.

In the event that hair is to be waved rather than straightened, a typical cold wave solution such as described above will operate satisfactorily. As pointed out above a cold wave solution is one which contains between five and ten percent thioglycolic acid as an operative ingredient. In the event that the solution is to be thickened, gum arabic may be added making the solution easier to apply without dripping.

In review, it will be seen that a mechanism has been provided which, depending upon the method of use and solutions employed, can be used to either permanently straighten kinky hair or permanently wave straight hair.

The unit is small, portable and easy to handle. The solutions employed are both safe to use, and effective in operation. The method of treatment gives a permanent set to the hair without many of the disadvantageous side effects exhibited by the techniques commonly practised.

Although a particular embodiment of the invention has been shown and described in full here, there is no intention to thereby limit the invention to the details of such embodiment. On the contrary, the intention is to cover all modifications, alternative embodiments, usages and equivalents of the mechanism, method, and solution for permanently conditioning hair as fall within the spirit and scope of the invention, specification, and appended claims.

I claim as my invention:

1. A device for conditioning the hair'comprising, in combination, a source of power, a long rod driven at one end thereof rotatably by the power source, a frame, said rod having a cylindrical surface, a friction piece held in contact with the rod adjacent one end thereof by said frame to heat the rod as the rod is rotatably driven by the power source, and a comb secured to said frame in a parallel and adjacent relationship with the rod, the whole in such combination that a strand of hair may be held by one hand of an operator while guiding the rotating rod with his other hand over the strand of hair as flattened for engagement with the rotating rod by the comb.

2. A device for conditioning the hair comprising, in combination, a source of power, a long cylindrical rod having a continuous smooth surface driven rotatably at one end thereof by the power source, a frame, a friction piece held in contact with the rod by said frame to heat the rod as the rod is rotatingly driven by the power source, a comb secured to said frame on an axis parallel with the axis of the rod and adjacent thereto, and a retractable hair clamp secured to said frame and engageable in a parallel relationship with the rod and the comb and mounted on an opposite side of the rod from the comb, the whole in such combination that a strand of hair may be held in one hand by the operator while guiding the same over the rotating heated rod, the hair being held against the rod by the clamp and flattened for continuous engagement by the comb.

3. A device for conditioning the hair comprising, in combination, a source of rotating power, a cylindrical rod driven by the power source at one end thereof, a frame, a friction piece held in contact with the rod by said frame to heat the rod as the rod is driven rotatably by the power source, a retractable comb mounted to said frame on an axis parallel and adjacent to the rod, a retractable hair clamp mounted on said frame and engageable in a parallel relationship with the rod and on the opposite side of the rod from the comb, and means connected with the clamp and comb to retract the comb simultaneously with the retraction of the clamp, the whole in such combination that a strand of hair may be manipulated back and forth across the rotating rod and heated thereby While conditioned for contact with the rod by the comb and clamp.

4. A device for conditioning the hair comprising, in combination, a source of rotating power, a rod rotatably driven by the power source at one end thereof, a frame, a friction piece held in contact with the rod by said frame to heat the rod as the rod is drivingly rotated by the power source, a comb mounted to said frame parallel with and adjacent to the rod, the whole in such combination that a strand of hair may be held by the operator against the rotating rod and combed in order to contact the rod for frictional and heat engagement whereby the hair may be worked to the desired condition.

5. .A device for conditioning the hair comprising, in combination, a source of power, a rod having a connection with the power source and rotatably driven thereby, a frame, a friction piece held in contact with the rod by said frame to heat the rod as the rod is drivingly rotated by the power source, a comb mounted to said frame in 6 parallel relationship with and adjacent to the rod, and a References Cited in the file of this patent retractable hair clamp secured to said frame and engage- UNITED STATES PATENTS able in parallel relationship with the rod and opposed from the comb orientation with relation to the rod, the 212 323; gi' 5g whole in such combination that a strand of hair may be 5 2446424 Kline 1948 held by an operator and run across the frictional surface 2524058 1950 of the rod and heated by the friction piece while spread by 2:542:514 Harrell Feb 1951 the comb and held in position by the retractable clamp 577 7 McDonough Dec. 4, 5 whereby the operator may, in accordance with desired 10 2,733,304 Arnold 13, 1956 result, condition the hair to a different configuration than 2,776,668 Morgan Jan, 3, 1957 normal. 2,809,150 McDonough Oct. 8, 1957

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1857689 *Feb 26, 1930May 10, 1932Emmanuel Melkman SaulHair waving device
US2094283 *Jan 27, 1936Sep 28, 1937Us Appliance CorpHair waving apparatus
US2446424 *Nov 7, 1946Aug 3, 1948Kline Elizabeth LHair dressing device
US2524058 *Jul 18, 1947Oct 3, 1950Bokri Kamara SoriElectromechanical hair curler
US2542514 *Jan 5, 1948Feb 20, 1951Harrell Oliver AHair waving mechanism
US2577711 *Nov 1, 1949Dec 4, 1951Goodrich Mcdonough EverettPermanent waving compositions and methods
US2738304 *Apr 27, 1951Mar 13, 1956Gillette CoCreaming composition
US2776668 *Jun 28, 1951Jan 8, 1957Rubinstein Inc HMethod and preparations for the permanent dyeing of keratinous material
US2809150 *Feb 26, 1951Oct 8, 1957Procter & GambleBromate-perhydrate fixing composition
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3870056 *Nov 7, 1973Mar 11, 1975Stemme WalterHair detangling device
US6070596 *Jun 30, 1999Jun 6, 2000Wahl Clipper CorporationHeated hair styling device
US6920886Nov 7, 2002Jul 26, 2005Wahl Clipper CorporationMulti-function hair styling iron
US20040089317 *Nov 7, 2002May 13, 2004Wahl Clipper CorporationMulti-function hair styling iron
Classifications
U.S. Classification132/269, 132/148
International ClassificationA45D2/00
Cooperative ClassificationA45D2/001
European ClassificationA45D2/00S