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Publication numberUS2988363 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJun 13, 1961
Filing dateNov 21, 1957
Priority dateNov 21, 1957
Publication numberUS 2988363 A, US 2988363A, US-A-2988363, US2988363 A, US2988363A
InventorsRichard M Hall
Original AssigneeRichard M Hall
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Golf game device
US 2988363 A
Abstract  available in
Images(1)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

June 13, 1961 R. M. HALL 2,988,363

GOLF GAME DEVICE Filed Nov. 21, 1957 III INVENTOR.

BY LMA vn. ma

TORNEY 2,988,363 GOLF GAME DEVICE Richard M. Hall, 808 W. '31st St., Richmond, Va. Filed Nov. 21, 1957, Ser. No. 697,837 4 Claims. (Cl. 273-181) This invention relates generally to a golf game device and more particularly to a golf game device for use in conjunction with an ordinary golf club and ball.

Golf enjoys a widespread popularity which is based in part upon the fact that players can exercise and relax in the fresh air. ln addition, it is not -a game for only one age group `but for all age groups. However, the fact that a permanent and meticulously cared for outdoor course is an essential feature of the game is a distinct disadvantage. Neither land nor money is plentiful enough to permit the construction and maintenance of enough courses to satisfy the public demand.

My invention is designed to provide outdoor fun and relaxation as well as exercise for people of -all ages by simulating the game of golf without using or requiring a permanent landscaped course. Thus the dual problems of land and money are almost completely eliminated and hence many people can use my invention who would never have an opportunity to play any game even remotely resembling golf.

Broadly, my invention is a series of Stands, preferably nine, spaced about the playing area; each stand comprising a base resting upon the ground and two uprights extending vertically from the ends of thevbase. Pivoted about the uprights are numbered score indicators and ya gate or stand marker. One side of the base will also comprise a ramp to allow a rolling ball to pass through the scoring area.

The invention will be more fully understood by reference to the Aaccompanying drawings illustrating a preferred embodiment of the invention, of which:

FIG. l is a perspective view of the manner in which the apparatus may be used;

FIG. 2 is a partial sectional front view of the apparatus shown in FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a partial sectional side view of FIG. 2; and

FIG. 4 is a sectional view taken along 4 4. h

As shown in FIG. 2 each gate comprises a base port1on 1 which rests upon the ground and maintains an entire gate in the proper vertical position. One side of the base portion comprises a ramp 2 up which a ball may roll if hit ialong the ground and not through the air. Set into each end of the base portion are molded sockets 3 adapted to receive Kand hold firmly in place upright members 4. Though held securely in position the uprights 4 are readily removable for ease in the disassembling and moving of the gates. Pivoted about the uprights are score indicators 5 comprising a cylinder portion 6 which encompasses an upright in frictional engagement and a flag portion 7 extending horizontally from the cylinder portion 6 almost one-half the distance between the two uprights 4. The flag portions 7 of oppositely situated indicators will not therefore touch each other. The score indicators 5 are pivoted about the uprights so that if a ball should strike an indicator, the indicator will swing to the rear as shown in FIG. 4. The score indicator so struck will remain in the displaced position, thereby aiding in scoring, by reason of the frictional engagement the cylinder portion 6 with the upright. Also pivoted about the uprights are cylindrical sleeves 8 which are easily removable like the score indicators 5. The sleeves 8 and score indicators 5 are slipped onto the uprights so that sleeves and score indicators Kalternate in varying combinations With each other from gate to gate, for example, one pattern being as shown in FIG. 2. A gate indicator 9 is put on the uprights in the same manner as the score "ice indicators are after the score indicators and sleeves are on. Each gate indicator bears a different number to designate the sequence of play and to permit scoring for each gate.

To be used the gates must iirst be spaced about the playing area. The arrangement may be any that is desired by the players, but it should be such that play will progress in a natural sequence from gate number 1 to gate number 2 and on to gate number 9. The ball is placed on the ground three or four yards from the iirst gate. The first player then attempts to hit the ball through the gate without hitting any-part of the gate. If the ball does actually pass through Vwithout touching a portion of the gate, the score for that player for that gate will be the number of actual strokes used. Should the ball strike a score indicator thereby forcing it to swing to the rear to permit the ball to continue on its llight, the score of the player includes the actual strokes plus the number written on the displaced score indicator. Thus, each player who causes the displacement of a score indicator rn eiTect suffers a penalty. Accurate scoring is assured because a score indicator moved by the impact of a ball will remain in a displaced position due to the frictional engagement of the score indicators with the uprights. At the end of the game the scores for each gate may be added to give a total medal score for each player, the lowest total winning as in golf. Also as in golf the lowest score for each gate is the winning score for that gate, and if mate play is simulated, the winner would be that player winning the most gates.

By changing the Iarrangement of the score indicators, which is done by varying the number and position of sleeves and score indicators on the uprights, each gate olers a new challenge to, and new opportunities for irnproving the players skill. However, a player may prefer the easy way of getting the ball through the gate by hitting the ball ialong the ground so that it will roll up the ramp and through the gate. To encourage players to try for a gate in one the score indicators are so advantageously arranged so l'that a rolling ball will always displace a score indicator thereby causing the player to suffer a penalty every time.

Additional rules can be devised by those using my invention to reect their personal preferences, e.g., penalties to be incurred when a ball hits fa non-movable part of the gate, boundary lines, when the player can move the ball back to the playing area and what additional strokes will be added to his score by so moving the ball.

The entire gate may be constructed from any solid material that can withstand the impact of moving golf balls. However, since one feature of my invention is the portability of the gates assembled or disassembled, a lightweight material would be preferred. My invention would not be affected by the choice of materials used.

While one embodiment of the invention has been shown and described in detail, it will be understood that this is illustrative only land is not to be taken as :a definition of the scope of the invention, reference being had for this purpose to the appended claims.

l claim:

1. Golf game apparatus comprising a series of gates, each of said gates comprising in turn a base portion one side of which is a ramp; two tubular upright members extending from said base portion, a plurality of randomly spaced score indicators pivoted about said upright tubular members so as to be moved upon impact, each of said score indicators being subject to friction drag to retain said score indicator in any displaced position it might assume following impact, said score indicators having a horizontal length of less than one-half the distance between said tubular uprights, a plurality of sleeves tted about each upright for separating some of said score-indicators mounted on said uprights; each of said score indicators and said sleeves being removable to permit a change in the arrangement o f score indicators and sleeves on the gate, and a removable gate indicatortted to the free ends of said tubularuprights.

2. A gate for a golf game comprising a base portion one side of which is a ramp; two tubular upright members extending from said base portion, a plurality of randomly spaced score indicators pivoted about said upright tubular members so as to be moved upon impact, each of said score indicators being subject to friction drag to retain said score indicator in any displaced position it might assume `following impact, sad score indicators having a horizontal length of less than one-half the distance between said tubular uprights, a plurality of sleeves tted about each upright for separating some of said score indicators mounted on said uprights; each of `said score indicators and `said sleeves being removable to permit a changetin the arrangement of score indicators and sleeves on the gate, anda removable gate indicator tted to the free ends of said tubular uprights.

3. Golf game apparatus comprising a series of gates each of said gates comprising two tubular upright members, `a plurality of randomly spaced score indicators pivoted about said upright tubular members so as to be moved upon impact, each of said score indicators being subject to friction drag to retain said score indicator in any displaced position it mightas sume following impact, a plurality of sleeves fitted about each upright for separating some of said score indicators mounted on said uprights; leach of said vscore indicators and said-sleeves'being removable to permit a change in the arrangement of score indicators and sleeves on the gate, and a removable gate indicator iitted to the free ends ,of said tubular uprights.

4. A gate for a golf gamecomprising two tubular upright members, a plurality of randomly spaced score indicators pivoted about'y said upright tubular members so as to be moved upon impact, each of said score indicators being subject to friction drag to retain said score indicator inany displaced position it might assume following impact, said score indicators having a horizontal length of less than lone-half the distance between said tubular uprights, a plurality of sleeves tted about each upright for separating some of said Yscore indicators mounted on saidtuprights; each of .said score indicators and said sleeves being removable to permit 4a changewn the arrangement of score indicators and ksleeves .onthe gate, and a removable gate indicator :fitted to .,thefree ends of said tubularuprights.

References Cited inthe-tile of this patent UNITED STATES -PATENTS 1,348,442 Prebble Aug. 3, 192,0

1,841,851 Semple n Jan.V 19, 19,32

1,952,187 Wade Mar. 27, 1934 2,372,111 Norberg a Mar. 20, 1945 FOREIGN PATENTS 468,079 Great Britain Dec. 12, 1936

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1348442 *Feb 3, 1920Aug 3, 1920Andrew PrebbleGame apparatus
US1841851 *Aug 24, 1929Jan 19, 1932Semple John BTarget
US1952187 *May 13, 1931Mar 27, 1934Ripley WadeGame
US2372111 *Apr 30, 1942Mar 20, 1945Clarance NorbergFolding target holder
GB468079A * Title not available
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3822883 *Jan 22, 1973Jul 9, 1974Vos J DeCompartmented net target and play field
US4208050 *Mar 26, 1979Jun 17, 1980Perrine James JJump measuring apparatus
US5064194 *Jan 18, 1991Nov 12, 1991Bixler Dickie RApparatus for use in practicing pitching of baseballs
US5181721 *Apr 26, 1991Jan 26, 1993Jeron Technology, Inc.Golf game apparatus
US5599017 *Jul 17, 1995Feb 4, 1997Dick Bixler Sports, Inc.Baseball target and projector apparatus
US5853335 *Apr 24, 1997Dec 29, 1998Self; Harry LeePitching and chipping golf game and training device
US5984793 *Aug 19, 1997Nov 16, 1999Carlo A. PalombiGolf game
US6994632 *Feb 9, 2001Feb 7, 2006Laurent MorinGolf training installation
WO1997012649A1 *Oct 5, 1995Apr 10, 1997Alain TetartVertical golf game
Classifications
U.S. Classification473/190, 473/195
International ClassificationA63B63/00
Cooperative ClassificationA63B63/00, A63B2024/0046
European ClassificationA63B63/00