Search Images Maps Play YouTube News Gmail Drive More »
Sign in
Screen reader users: click this link for accessible mode. Accessible mode has the same essential features but works better with your reader.

Patents

  1. Advanced Patent Search
Publication numberUS2990651 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 4, 1961
Filing dateMay 16, 1958
Priority dateMay 16, 1958
Publication numberUS 2990651 A, US 2990651A, US-A-2990651, US2990651 A, US2990651A
InventorsChalmers Alexander A
Original AssigneeBrixite Mfg Co Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Overlap shake siding
US 2990651 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
Previous page
Next page
Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

y 4, 1951 A. A. CHALMERS 2,990,651

OVERLAP SHAKE SIDING Filed May 16, 1958 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 TOR.

l INVEN A OZ/VE Y5 United States Patent 2,990,651 OVERLAP SHAKE SIDING Alexander A. Chalmers, Caldwell, N.J., assignor to Brixite Manufacturing Co., Inc., South Kearny, NIL, a corporation of New Jersey Filed May 16, 1958, Ser. No. 735,770 17 Claims. CC]. 50-240) This invention relates to building siding, and more particular to overlap shake siding which is applied in the form of relatively heavy panels, but which is intended to simulate shingles.

The general object of the' present invention is to improve overlap shake siding of the specified character. In a common and popular size, the panels are about forty four inches long, eleven inches wide, and inch thick. The edges are rabbeted at the back to a depth of A1, inch, leaving a thickness of approximately inch. A panel is applied with its lower rabbeted edge overlying the upper edge of the next lower panel, and thus the apparent thickness of the simulated shingle, as exposed at the lower edge of the upper panel, is approximately inch. This thickness is sometimes called the butt thickness.

It is considered desirable to simulate a heavy shingle, that is, to increase the butt thickness. The primary object of the present invention is to provide a very substantial increase, say inch or more, in the apparent butt thickness, without requiring an actual increase in the board thickness; without reducing the depth of the rabbet; without introducing extra filler strips between the overlapped boards; without increasing the cost of manufacture of the panel; and without increasing the labor and consequent cost of applying the panels to a building wall.

To accomplish the foregoing objects, and other more specific objects which will herein-after appear, my invention resides in the overlap shake siding panel, and the elements thereof, as are more particularly described in the following specification. The specification is accompanied by a drawing in which:

FIG. 1 is a fragmentary vertical section showing the relation between overlapped panels made in accordance with my invention;

FIG. 2 is a similar fragmentary section showing a different form of the invention;

FIG. 3 is a fragmentary front view drawn to small scale and showing the relation of overlapped panels on a building wall;

FIG. 4 is a fragmentary view of panels simulating a different kind of shingle;

FIG. 5 is a schematic view explanatory of a step in the manufacture of the panel shown in FIG. 1;

FIG. 6 in a schematic View explanatory of another step in the manufacture of the panel shown in FIG. 1;

FIG. 7 is a schematic view explanatory of a step in the manufacture of the panel shown in FIG. 2; and

FIG. 8 is a fragmentary View looking in the direction of the arrows 88 in FIG. 3.

Referring to the drawing, and more particularly to FIG. 1, the lower edge of an upper siding panel 12, is shown overlapping the upper edge of a lower panel 14. Both panels are nailed in conventional fashion to a building wall 18. The panels are alike, that is, the lower edge of panel 14 as shown for panel 12, and the upper edge of panel 12 is as shown for panel 14. The panels have a rabbeted bottom edge as shown at 16, to definitely fix the overlap when applying the panels to a building wall 18.

The panels are conventional in comp-rising a composition or fiberboard base characterized by good heat insulation properties. This is heavily coated with a waterproofing adhesive substance, typically asphalt, as shown at 22. Usually, and preferably, the board 20 is impregnated with asphalt, apart from the coating at 22. The

latter is surfaced with mineral granules, sometimes called grit, is indicated at 24.

In the prior practice, the panel has an overall thickness of about inch, and the rabbet 16 has a depth of inch, thus leaving an exposed edge at 26 with a thickness of about inch.

In accordance with the present invention, however, the front face of the panel has an indented channel 28 extending parallel to the upper edge, and spaced a little below the upper edge. The formation of this channel serves to displace material and to raise a ridge 30 at the upper edge of the channel, and this ridge is nearer the upper edge 32 of the panel than the width of the rabbet 16, so that the rabbet of upper panel 12 rests on the raised ridge 30- of lower panel 14. In preferred form the upper edge 34- of channel 28 is so spaced from the upper edge 32 of the panel, relative to the width of the rabbet 16, that the lower edge 26 of the upper panel 12 is flush the lower edge of the ridge 30, and also with the upper edge 34 of the channel 28.

In the particular case shown, the rabbet 16 is /2 inch wide, and the upper edge of channel 34 is located /2 from the upper edge 32 of the panel. In any case, with this arrangement, the apparent thickness of the shingles (or the so-called butt thickness) is made up of the pants 26, 30 and 34, and adds up to A2 inch or more, instead of /8 inch. The channel 28 is indented to a depth of A to inch, and the ridge 30 rises at least inch and ordinarily, somewhat more than that.

The channel 28 is preferably indented by a narrow roller as: schematically shown at 45 in FIG. 5, beneath which a panel 40 is being run. Of course, when the channel 42 is first indented, two ridges 43 and 44 are formed at the edges of channel 42. However, one step in the treatment of the panel is to run it under a roller which helps level and control its final thickness, and this roller is so disposed as to flatten the ridge 43 without afiecting the ridge 44. This is schematically indicated in FIG. 6, in which panel 40, having channel 42 and ridge 44, is being run beneath a finishing roller 46. The latter is disposed with its edge 48 over the channel 42, so that it will flatten the ridge at the lower side of the channel, without however flattening the ridge 44.

Referring now to FIG. 2 of the drawing, I there show overlapping panels 50 and 52. These diifer in two respects. The first is in providing a sloping channel 54 instead of a rectangular channel. To form such a channel, the roller which produces the channel is preferably frusto conical instead of cylindrical. This is illustrated in FIG. 7 in which a panel 56 is channeled by running it beneath frusto conical roller 58, thereby producing a ridge 60* at one side of the channel, without producing any significant amount of corresponding ridge at the other side of the channel.

Reverting to FIG. 2, the ridge 60 corresponds to the ridge 30 in FIG. 1, and is similarly located, that is, the upper edge 62 of channel 54 is preferably spaced from the top edge 64 of panel 52, an amount substantially equal to the width of the rabbet 66. In a typical case, this spacing and width may be /2 The depth of the channel at 62 may be to inch, and ridge 60 has a height of inch or more. The butt thickness is then made up of the lower edge 68 of panel 50, and the ridge 60 and the channel 62, making a total of /2 inch or more instead of inch.

Another difference in panels 50 and 52, compared to panels 112 and 14 in FIG. 1, is that there is a rabbet 66 at the lower edge only. The upper edge 64 has no rabbet, thereby differing from the panel shown at FIG. 1 in which the upper edge has a rabbet 70 (which ordinarily is similar in dimension to the rabbet 16 at the lower edge).

It will be understood that these elements are interchangeable, that is the triangular channel of FIG. 2 may be used on a panel having both edges rabbeted, as in FIG. 1, and conversely the rectangularchannel of FIG. 1 may be used on a panel having only its bottom edge rabbeted, as shown in FIG. 2.

The ends of the panels may be rabbeted in accordance with present conventional practice. There are mating or reversed rabbets, that is, if the back is rabbeted at the left end, as shown in FIG. 8 for panel 72, the front is rabbeted at the right end, thus permitting panels to be fitted with a flush fit at the ends as shown in broken lines for the next adjacent panel. In applying the panels to a wall, the overlapped ends of one pair are preferably offset or staggered relative to another pair, and this is shown in FIG. 3, in which a lower panel 72 is overlapped at its upper edge by a next panel 74, which is applied with its end 76 offset sidewardly from the end 78 of panel 72. Similarly, the next higher panel 80 overlaps the panel 74, but its end 82 is offset still further to the right. The channeling of these panels is indicated at 34, 86 and 88.

In the example shown in FIG. 3, the simulated shingles are marked by closely adjacent vertical lines, some of which are deeper than others. However, the invention is applicable to overlapping panels simulating different kinds of shingles, and another example is illustrated in FIG. 4. Here again the panel 90 is overlapped by panel 92, which in turn is overlapped by panel 94, and each of the panels has a channel 96, 98 and 100 to provide desired increased butt thickness. The panels have rather widely spaced lines to simulate separate shingles, and these shingles have wavy lines to suggest a wood surface. The ends of the panels are not shown in FIG. 4, but it will be understood that here again the ends preferably have reverse or mating rabbets for a flush fit, and that the end joints are preferably located in stepped or sidewardly displaced relationship.

It is believed that the construction, method of manufacture, and method of applying my improved overlap shake siding panel, as well as the advantages thereof, will be apparent from the foregoing detailed description. It will also be apparent that while I have shown and described my invention in several preferred forms, changes may be made in the structures shown, without departing from the scope of the invention as sought to be defined in the following claims.

I claim:

1. A building siding panel simulating thick shingles, said panel being rectangular with a rabbeted bottom edge for overlap, said panel comprising a composition base board coated with a waterproofing adhesive substance, and the latter being surfaced with mineral granules, the front face of said panel having an indented channel extending parallel to the upper edge a little below the upper edge and a ridge of displaced material at the upper edge of the channel, said ridge being nearer the upper edge of the panel than the width of the bottom rabbet, and being raised relative to the main front surface of the panel, whereby the rabbet of an upper panel will rest on the ridge of a lower panel in order to increase the apparent thickness of the shingles.

2. A building siding panel simulating thick shingles, said panel being rectangular with a rabbeted bottom edge for overlap, said panel comprising a composition base board coated with a waterproofing adhesive substance, and the latter being surfaced with mineral granules, the front face of said panel having an indented channel extending parallel to the upper edge a little below the upper edge and a ridge of displaced material at the upper edge of the channel, and being raised relative to the main front surface of the panel, the upper edge of the channel being so spaced from the upper edge of the board relative to the width of the bottom rabbet that the rabbet of an upper panel will rest on the ridge of a lower panel with the- 4 lower edge of the upper panel substantially flush with the lower edge of the ridge.

3. A building siding panel simulating thick shingles, said panel being rectangular with a rabbeted bottom edge for overlap, and with rabbeted end edges for a flush butt fit at the ends, said panel comprising a composition base board impregnated and heavily coated with asphalt, and the latter being surfaced with mineral granules, the front face of said panel having an indented channel extending parallel to the upper edge a little below the upper edge and a ridge of displaced material at the upper edge of the channel, said ridge being nearer the upper edge of the panel than the width of the bottom rabbet, and being raised relative to the main front surface of the panel, whereby the rabbet of an upper panel will rest on the ridge of a lower panel in order to increase the apparent thickness of the shingles.

4. A building siding panel simulating thick shingles, said panel being rectangular with rabbeted top and bottom edges for overlap, and with rabbeted end edges for a flush butt fit at the ends, said panel comprising a composition base board impregnated and heavily coated with asphalt, and the latter being surfaced with mineral granules, the front face of said panel having an idented channel extending parallel to the upper edge a little below the upper edge and a ridge of displaced material at the upper edge of the channel, and being raised relative to the main front surface of the panel, the upper edge of the channel being so spaced from the upper edge of the board relative to the width of the bottom rabbet that the rabbet of an upper panel will rest on the ridge of a lower panel with the lower edge of the upper panel substantially flush with the lower edge of the ridge and the upper edge of the channel in order to greatly increase the apparent thickness of the shingles.

5. A building siding panel as defined in claim 1 in which the channel is approximately triangular in crosssection, with the deep edge of the channel at the top.

6. A building siding panel as defined in claim 2 in which the channel is approximately triangular in crosssection, with the deep edge of the channel at the top.

7. A building siding panel as defined in claim 3 in which the channel is approximately triangular in crosssection, with the deep edge of the channel at the top.

8. A building siding panel as defined in claim 4 in which the channel is approximately triangular in crosssection, with the deep edge of the channel at the top.

9. A building siding panel as defined in claim 1 in which the channel is approximately rectangular in crosssection.

10. A building siding panel as defined in claim 2 in which the channel is approximately rectangular in crosssection.

11. A building siding panel as defined in claim 3 in which the channel is approximately rectangular in crosssection, and in which the lower edge of the channel is devoid of a raised ridge such as that existing along the upper edge of the channel.

12. A building siding panel as defined in claim 4 in which the channel is approximately rectangular in crosssection, and in which the lower edge of the channel is devoid of a raised ridge such as that existing along the upper edge of the channel,

13. An exterior building wall covered with a plurality of siding panels as defined in claim 1 in which the ends of the panels are offset or staggered, and in which the lower rabbeted edge of each upper panel overlies the adjacent raised ridge of each lower panel.

14. An exterior building wall covered with a plurality of siding panels as defined in claim 2 in which the ends of the panels are offset or staggered, and in which the lower rabbeted edge of each upper panel overlies the adacent raised ridge of each lower panel with the lower edge ofthe upper panel substantially flush with the lower edge of the ridge and the upper edge of the channel, wherebythe apparent thickness of the lower edge of the upper panel is increased by both the height of the ridge and the depth of the channel.

15. An exterior building wall covered with a plurality of siding panels as defined in claim 3 in which the ends of the panels are oifset or staggered, and in which the lower rabbeted edge of each upper panel overlies the adjacent raised ridge of each lower panel.

16. An exterior building wall covered with a plurality of siding panels as defined in claim 4 in which the ends of the panels are ofiset or staggered, and in which the lower rabbeted edge of each upper panel overlies the adjacent raised ridge of each lower panel with the lower edge of the upper panel substantially flush with the lower edge of the ridge and the upper edge of the channel, whereby the apparent thickness of the lower edge of the upper panel is increased by both the height of the ridge and the depth of the channel.

17. A building siding panel simulating thick shingles, said panel being rectangular with a rabbeted bottom edge for overlap, the front face of said panel having an indented channel extending parallel to the upper edge a little below the upper edge and a ridge of displaced material at the upper edge of the channel, said ridge being nearer the upper edge of the panel than the width of the bottom rabbet, and being raised relative to the main front surface of the panel, whereby the rabbet of an upper panel will rest on the ridge of a lower panel in order to increase the apparent thickness of the shingles.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 1,219,652 McKay Mar. 20, 1917 1,915,905 Speer June 27, 1933 2,153,015 Voigt Apr. 4, 1939 2,156,566 Kirschbraun May 2, 1939 2,231,008 Ochs Feb. 11, 1941 2,241,080 Carpenter May 6, 1941 Williams Sept. 19, 1944

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US1219652 *Apr 18, 1916Mar 20, 1917William F MckayPrepared roofing.
US1915905 *Feb 13, 1930Jun 27, 1933Certain Teed Prod CorpRoofing
US2153015 *Dec 21, 1935Apr 4, 1939Johns ManvilleSiding unit and assembly
US2156566 *Apr 16, 1935May 2, 1939Patent & Licensing CorpBuilding unit and method of manufacture thereof
US2231008 *Oct 11, 1937Feb 11, 1941Bakelite Building Prod Co IncSurface covering and assembly thereof
US2241080 *Sep 7, 1940May 6, 1941Duramore Buildings IncGrooved plywood facing
US2358550 *Oct 31, 1942Sep 19, 1944Williams Richard NBuilding material
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US4015391 *Feb 13, 1973Apr 5, 1977Alside, Inc.Simulated cedar shake construction
US4261152 *Sep 24, 1979Apr 14, 1981Champion International CorporationMulti-lap siding with beaded edge
US7694477 *Jan 3, 2007Apr 13, 2010Peter KuelkerHangerless precast cladding panel system
US8443563 *Apr 7, 2011May 21, 2013Malcolm SchmidtBuilding block having the appearance of wood shake
US8621811 *Nov 4, 2008Jan 7, 2014Steven David HartmanThermoplastic siding insulation
US20070186501 *Jan 3, 2007Aug 16, 2007Peter KuelkerHangerless precast cladding panel system
US20090145065 *Nov 4, 2008Jun 11, 2009Industrial Thermo Polymers LimitedThermoplastic siding insulation
US20110247289 *Apr 7, 2011Oct 13, 2011Malcolm SchmidtBuilding Block Having The Appearance of Wood Shake
Classifications
U.S. Classification52/541, D25/139, 52/553, 52/316, 52/604, 52/554
International ClassificationE04F13/08
Cooperative ClassificationE04F13/0864
European ClassificationE04F13/08D