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Publication numberUS2990739 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 4, 1961
Filing dateJun 8, 1959
Priority dateJun 8, 1959
Publication numberUS 2990739 A, US 2990739A, US-A-2990739, US2990739 A, US2990739A
InventorsZifferer Kenneth B
Original AssigneeUs Expansion Bolt Company
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Axial-impact tool with reversible chuck
US 2990739 A
Abstract  available in
Images(2)
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

y 1961 K. B. ZIFFERER 2,990,739

, AXIAL-IMPACT TOOL WITH REVERSIBLE CHUCK Filed June 8, 1959 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 A TTORNEYS.

United States Patent f 2,990,739 AXIAL-IMPACT TOOL WITH REVERSIBLE CHUCK Kenneth B. Zitlerer, York, Pa., assignor to United States Expansion Bolt Company, York, Pa., a corporation of Pennsylvania 7 Filed June 8, 1959, Ser. No. 818,732 12 Claims. ((181-5235) This invention relates to hand tools. More particularly, this invention relates to multiple purpose hand tools having a variety of reversible and interchangeable parts.

It is an object of this invention to provide a hand hammer fastening tool of simple and sturdy construction which is primarily adapted to the driving of a variety of hard, pointed pins, threaded studs and similar objects into construction materials such as concrete, mild steel, composition block, and the like, and which is also readily convertible for use with a variety of interchangeable tool parts, such as twist drills, chisels, screw drivers, socket adapters, self-drilling anchors, etc.

' It is another object of this invention to provide a hand hammer fastening tool having the foregoing attributes and adapted to the aforesaid purposes which contains within itself all the elements necessary for the reversibility of the parts thereof without resorting to accessory tools of any kind.

It is another object of this invention to provide a hand hammer fastening tool of the kind aforedescribed which is contoured to provide a relatively non-slip grip and to minimize operator fatigue, and which is also provided with hat surfaces whereby said tool may be laid down upon scaffolds and other structures without danger that it will roll off or fall therefrom.

' It is another object of this invention to provide a hand hammer fastening tool having measuring means whereby pointed pins, studs, and the like, may be easily driven into construction materials of the kind aforementioned, to the particular depth desired without removal of the tool from the surface of said material for inspection.

it is another object of this invention to provide an anvil element in connection with a hand hammer fastening tool which when struck by a hammer, mallet, or the like, affords a minimal rebound to the blow thereof whereby the assembled parts of said tool remain intact without any attention thereto on the part of the opera-tor thereof;

It is another object of this invention to provide an anvil element in connection with a hand hammer fastening tool of the kind aforedescribed' which is shouldered on the body'of said tool in a manner to equalize the: stress resulting from the blow of a hammer, mallet, or the like, on all parts of the tool, whereby excessive wear upon any one part of the tool is avoided.

It is another object of this invention toprovide a hand hammer fastening tool of the kind aforedescribed having a detachable chuck to which a large variety of guards, templates, jigs and disc holders, or the like, canbe att-ached for use in connection with many different kinds of surfaces and materials and for a great variety of purposes;

It is another object of this invention to provide a hand hammer fastening. tool whereby pointed pins, studs and the like, may be easily driven into a large variety of construction materials without the necessity of pre-drilling, or other preparation.

Other objects and attendant advantages will become apparent from the attached drawings wherein:

I FIG; 1 is a view in elevation of a multiple purpose hand hammer fastening tool constructed. in accordance With this invention.

ice

FIG. 2 is a view in top plan of the tool.

FIG. 3 is a sectional view of the tool showing the manner in which the tool is used to drive a pin into suitable construction material, such as masonry, for the purpose of fastening paneling or the like thereto.

FIG. 4 is a fragmentary sectional view of the tool showing the positioning of a pin in the lower portion thereof prior to driving the pin into a surface of masonry or the like.

FIG. 5 is a view in elevation of a pointed pin or stud having an annular disc mounted thereon as used in accordance with this invention.

FIG. 6 is a view in elevation of the anvil and driving rod elements of the tool as constructed in accordance with this invention.

FIG. 7 is a fragmentary view in section of the tool showing the reversible holder or chuck thereof in reversed position and accommodating therewithin the tapered end of a detachable screw driver element.

FIG. 8 is a view in elevation of a tapered detachable star drill tool element as provided in accordance with this invention.

FIG. 9 is a View in elevation of a tapered detachable twist drill tool element as provided in accordance with this invention.

FIG. 10 is a view in perspective of a modification of the reversible shank as provided in accordance with this invention, showing the manner in which a hexagonal socket is provided therein, together with the hexagonally shaped head of an associated screw bolt.

FIG. 11 is a sectional view showing a wire fastener as driven into a wall by the tool.

FIG. IQ is a sectional view showing a threaded stud. as driven into a wall by the tool.

The following description is directed to the specificforms of the hand tool as shown in the drawings and is not intended to be addressed to the scope of the invention as exemplified by the drawings. It will be appreciated that the drawings represent preferred embodiments of the invention which is capable of being practiced in a wide variety of forms and arrangements.

Adverting herewith to the specific form of the invention illustrated in the drawings, a hand hammer tool as constructed in accordance with this invention comprises a cylindrical tube 10 (FIG. 3) formed of suitable hard metal, such as steel, the inside diameter of which is of suitable dimension to accommodate the close fitting shank =11 of a driving element 9 arranged to move slidingly within said tube in an axial direction. At the upper end of the shank 11 there is formed a head or anvil 12 having a striking surface 13. A rubber coating or hand grip 14 surrounds the outer surface. of the tube 10 and has formed thereon adjacent the lower end of said tube the ridges 15a, 15b, 15c to insure a secure grip of the tool. At the upper end of the tube the rubber coating 14 is flanged outward to form a hexagonally-sided hand guard 14a.

Affixedto the lower end of the shank is a driving rod 16 which extends downward through an axial bore 17 of slightly larger diameter which is formed in a reversible holder or chuck 18 positioned in the lower portion of the tube 10. At the lower end of the tube 10 there are provided internal screw. threads 19 by means of which either end of the reversible chuck 18 may be, screwed into the tube 10 at either of the threaded portions 22 or 23. As may be seen in FIGS. 3 and 7, the bore 17 is formed to have an outwardly tapering counterbore 1711 at the end of 18a of chuck 18 and has another outwardly tapering disc retaining counterbore 17b at the end 18b of chuck 18. The chuck 18 is further provided with a transverse bore 24 near the end 18a thereof, the axis of which is perpendicular to the axis of the bore 17. Intermediate the ends 18a and 18b of the chuck 18 is a stop 25, on each side of which are the two sets of screw threads of opposing pitch, 22 and 23. An aperture 26 is provided in the stop 25 extending from the outer surface thereof to a depth sufficient to permit insertion of the distal end 16a of the driving rod 16 thereinto whereby either end of the reversible chuck 18 may be screwed tightly into the lower end of the tube 10. From the foregoing, it will be clear that the chuck 18 is comprised of a segment 18c extending from the stop 25 to the end 18a and a shorter segment 18d extending from the stop 25 to the end 18b.

As may be seen in FIGS. 1 and 6, the anvil 12 is pro vided with a lower bevelled edge 12a which shoulders against the top of the tube 10 when the driving element 9 has been inserted to its fullest extent within the tube 10. As illustrated in FIG. 3, when the anvil 12 is shouldered against the top of the tube 10, the driving rod 16 extends into the bore 17 within the chuck 18 so that the end 16a of the driving rod 16 is substantially flush with the narrowest portion of the counterbore 17b. As may best be seen in FIG. 3, a base or jig 27 may be sesured to the end 18b of the reversible chuck 18 by means of the screw threads 28. The base 27 is provided with a fiat surface 29 and an axial bore 30.

FIG. illustrates a pointed pin 31 which is used in the practice of this invention and which is adapted to be driven into a masonry wall or other surface 59 by means of the hand hammer tool as constructed according to this invention. illustrated in FIG. 3 wherein the paneling P is shown secured to the adjacent surface 59 by means of a tightly wedged pin which has been driven thereinto in a manner to be more fully described hereinafter. The pointed pin of FIG. 5 is made of hardened steel and comprises integrally formed sections 33 and 34 of generally cylindrical shape. Section 33, of larger diameter than section 34, is flanged outward at the top thereof to form a head 35 of the pin. Section 34 narrows to the point 36 which serves as the penetrating point of the pin. Connecting the two sections 33 and 34 is a neck 37 which forms a wedge in association with section 33 to hold the pin securely in position in the wall or surface into which it is driven. Disposed on section 34 immediately adjacent the neck 37 is an annular disc 38 made of soft steel or other metal.

. As may best be seen in FIGS. 1 and 4, When the driv-' ing element 9 has been partially pulled out of the tube so that the driving rod 16 has been pulled up through the bore 17, the pointed pin 31 may be inserted into the bottom portion of the bore 17 of the chuck 18 through the bore 30 of the base 27 until the disc 38 enters the counterbore 17b and becomes wedged therein, thereby detachably holding the pin in position within the bore 17.

The shank 11 is further provided with three annular grooves 41, 42, and 43 (see FIGS. 1 and 6) which serve to indicate the extent of penetration of the pin 31 in a manner to be more fully explained hereinafter. In addition, a larger annular groove is provided in the shank 11 near the end adjacent the driving rod 16 for the reception and retainment of a rubber O ring 44 which presses frictionally against the inside wall of the tube 10.

FIG. 7 illustrates the hand tool as constructed in accordance with this invention with the chuck 18 screwed into the tube 10 in the reverse position from that shown in FIG. 3. Wedged within the tapered counterbore 17a at the end 18a of the chuck 18 is the tapered end 45 of an interchangeable screw driver element 46 having a working head 47. The tapered end 45 of tool element 46 is provided wtih an annular groove 48 which coincides with the transverse bore 24 when the tapered shank 45 has been wedged into the tapered counterbore 17a A typical use of the pointed pin 31 is.

so that the end 18a of the chuck 18 abuts a limiting stop 49 forming the base of the tapered section 45. Further illustrated in FIG. 7 in dot-dash lines is a key 50 which may be inserted into the bore 24 and wedged between the wall thereof and the annular groove 48 in the tapered section 45 as a convenient means of removing the interchangeable tool element 46 from the chuck 18. FIGS. 8 and 9 illustrate, respectively, an interchangeable star drill element and an interchangeable twist drill element for use with the hand hammer tool in accordance with this invention.

1 FIG. 10 illustrates a modification of the reversible chuck as constructed in accordance with this invention in which the tapered counterbore17a in the long end 18a of the reversible chuck 18 is replaced by a hexagonally shaped socket 53 which may be fitted over the hexagonally shaped head 54 of a screw bolt, whereby said bolt may be turned in the direction desired by the manual application of suitable torque to the tool.

Studs or pins 31a and 31b are shown in FIGS. 11 and 12, respectively, and illustrate the manner in which a variety of such studs may be driven into a wall or other surface in the ordinary practice of this invention. The stud 31a is provided with a head 35a of cylindrical proportion which has a lateral hole or bore 32a extending therethrough perpendicularly to the longitudinal axis thereof. the stud 31a by means of a hook or wire inserted through the hole 32a. Stud 31b is provided with a threaded head 35b for the reception of a suitably threaded nut whereby an object may be screwed tightly against the adjacent wall or surface as desired.

In the practice of this invention, when it is desired to drive a pin, stud or similar object into a wall or other surface for a variety of purposes, among which may be, for example, the securing of the paneling P adjacent a. masonry wall, or the like, such as the surface 59, the driving element 9 is withdrawn from the tube 10 and the end 18:: of the reversible chuck 18 inserted into the threaded end thereof so that the threads 22 of the chuck engage the threads 19 of the tube. To tighten the chuck securely into position, the end 16a of the driving rod 16 is inserted into the hole 26 and torque applied. After assembling the chuck in the tube in the aforesaid manner, the driving element 9 is again inserted into the tube so that the driving rod 16 enters the bore 17 of the chuck. The anvil 12 is positioned a sufficient distance from the upper end of the tube 10 to permit the pin 31 to be inserted head-first into the bore 17 at the end 18b of the chuck 18, as shown in FIG. 4. When the pin has been inserted into the bore in the manner aforedescribed, sufiicient pressure is applied to secure the pin in position by means of the frictional contact of the disc 38 with the tapered wall of the counterbore 17b. With the pin in position as illustrated in FIG. 4, the hand hammer tool is positioned so that the flat surface 29 of the base 27, which has been tightly screwed onto the end 18b of the shank, is adjacent the wall or other surface to be penetrated. With the point 36 of the pin placed in the exact spot at which penetration is to take place, a hammer blow is struck against the striking surface 13 of the anvil 12 forcing rod 16 downward against the head 35 of pin 31 whereupon the pin penetrates the material 59 sufiiciently that the flat surface 29 of the base 27 can be pressed flush against the surface to be penetrated. After a blow has been struck upon the striking surface 13 of the anvil 12, and the end 16a of the driving rod 16 has communicated the force of the blow to the head of the pin 31, the driving element 9 will tend to rebound in reaction to the blow. The tendency of the element 9 to rebound out of the tube 10, however, is minimized by the effect of the frictional force of the rubber ring 44 surrounding the shank 11 and in contact with the inner wall of the tube 10. Successive blows by a hammer, mallet, or the like, against the anvil 12 will cause A variety of objects may be suspended from the pin 31 to penetrate the wall or surface'59 to the particular depth desired.

The large section 33 of the pin 31, as well as the driving rod 16, is shrouded by the bore 17 of the chuck 18. As the hammer or mallet strikes the anvil 12, the driving rod 16 strikes against the head 35 of the pin and the resulting pressure is communicated axially of the pin, which is thereby forced into the wall or surface. The protecting shroud of the bore 17 prevents both the deflection and bending of the driving rod 16 and of the pin 31. For the foregoing reasons it is unnecessary to predrill or otherwise prepare the surface to be penetrated by the pin 31.

Guides 43, 42, and 41 indicate by their relative position from the end of the tube or from the guard 14a the distance into the wall that the pin has been driven. When the pin has been positioned as desired, the hand hammer tool may be removed by lifting it from the adjacent surface leaving the pin securely wedged therein.

It will be noted that the design of the pin is such that it is securely wedged into the material '59 by reason of the gradually- Widening surface of neck 37 and the wide section 33. As the pin is driven into the wall, the disc 38 moves toward the head so that the pin is effectively driven through the disc; and if the pin is driven into the wall for its whole length, the disc 38 becomes positioned adjacent the head 35.

Whenever it is desired to use the hand tool as constructed according to this invention for a variety of purposes other than the driving of pins or studs, the driving element 9 is removed from the tube 10 and the end 16a of the driving rod 16 inserted into the hole 26 and a torque applied to loosen the reversible chuck 18. The chuck end 18a is removed from the tube and the opposite end 18b inserted into the tube so that the threads 19 and 23 are mutually engaged. The driving rod 16 may again be used to tighten the chuck 18 into the tube 10. When the chuck 18 has been positioned in this manner so that its long end 18a extends outward from the tube 10, the hand tool may be used with a variety of interchangeable tool elements as illustrated. For example, the screw driver tool element 46 may be attached to the hand tool by the insertion of its tapered section into the open end of the chuck 18 so that the aforesaid section becomes frictionally engaged within the tapered counterbore 17a in the manner illustrated in FIG. 7. After positioning the screw driver tool element within the aforesaid tapered chuck 17a, the entire hand tool may be used as a screw driver. In like manner, the interchangeable elements 46a and 46b may be fitted into the tapered counterbore 17a of the chuck 18.

Whenever it becomes necessary to remove the tool element 46 from the chuck, this may be accomplished by the insertion of an ejector key into the transverse bore 24 so as to pass into the groove 48 in the tapered section 45 of tool element 46 and thereupon free the tool element from the chuck.

Although in the specific embodiment of this invention the shape of the tapered counterbore 17a and the correspondingly tapered section 45 of the tool element 46 have been described and illustrated as generally frustoconical in form, it will be appreciated that the aforesaid tapered counterbore and the correspondingly tapered section of the aforesaid tool element are not limited to that form. On the contrary, the tapered counterbore may be multi-sided, as in the modification of this invention shown in FIG. 10, as may also be the correspondingly tapered sections of the interchangeable tool element. Moreover, the tapered chuck may also be formed with a narrow slot in a wall thereof for engagement with a correspondingly shaped key element formed as a part of the aforesaid tapered section 45.

It will be apparent that an important advantage of this invention is realized by the provision therein of a novel chuck element which is easily and readily reversible 6 without. the aid of any accessory tools or parts other'than thosecontai'ned within the hand tool itself. Moreover, the unequal lengths of each end of the reversible chuck as provided in accordance with this invention contributes to the ready convertibility of the tool for a variety of purposes.

Another important advantage of this invention lies in the manner in which pins or studs and the like, may be driven into very hard construction materials without the deflection, bending or breaking of said pins and studs and without recourse to any predrilling or other preparation.

Although this. invention has been disclosed with refer ence to specific forms and embodiments thereof, it will be evident that a great number of variations may be made without departing from the spirit and scope of this invention. For example, parts may be reversed, equivalent elements may be substituted for those specifically disclosed, and certain features of the invention may be used independently of other features, all without departing from the spirit and scope of this invention as defined in the appended claims.

Having thus described my invention, I claim:

1. A multiple-purpose hand tool comprising in combination a hollow handle for said tool, an anvil element disposed adjacent an end of said handle, a reversible chuck disposed within the opposite end of said handle, said chuck having an axial bore extending therethrough and comprising sections of different longitudinal dimension at opposite ends thereof, means disposed at one end of said chuck for the detachable retention of an anchoring device therein, socket means disposed at the opposite end thereof for engagement with a correspondingly headed object, and means arranged within said bore for driving said anchoring device therefrom by striking said anvil element.

2. The hand tool defined in claim 1 wherein either end of said chuck is threadable into said handle, said chuck being divided intermediate the ends thereof by a laterally projecting segment extending transversely to the longitudinal axis of said chuck, said segment abutting the end of said handle when either end of said chuck is threaded thereinto.

3. The hand tool defined in claim 2 wherein the distance from said segment to one end of said chuck is greater than the distance from said segment to the other end thereof.

4. The hand tool defined in claim 3 wherein said chuck is adapted to retain at either end thereof a threaded base for said tool. i

5. A multiple-purpose hand tool compnsmg in combination a hollow handle for said tool, an anvil element disposed adjacent an end of said handle, a reversible chuck extending into said handle at the opposite end thereof, said chuck having an axial bore extending therethrough, said bore being adapted for the detachable retention of an anchoring device at one end thereof and an interchangeable tool element at the opposite end thereof, means connected to said anvil element for driving said anchoring device from said bore by striking said anvil ele ment, and means detachably connected to said chuck for holding said tool against a surface.

6. A multiple-purpose hand hammer tool comprising in common a hollow handle for said tool, said handle being partially threaded at an end thereof, an anvil element slidably arranged adjacent the end of said handle opposite said threaded end, a threaded reversible chuck, said chuck being adapted at each end thereof to screw into said threaded end of said handle, said chuck having formed intermediate the threads thereof a lateral segment adapted to abut the end of said handle, said segment dividing said chuck into a long end and a short end, said chuck having an axial bore therethrough, said chuck having tapered counterbores at each end thereof connecting with said axial bore, a movable driving rod attached I to said anvil element and extending into said bore, and a threaded base adapted to be attached to either exposed end of said chuck.

-7. The hand tool defined in claim 6 wherein said anvil element comprises a striking head and a shank, said shank extending into said handle and arranged to slide entirely thereinto, said striking head being arranged to shoulder on the end of said tubular handle when said shank is entirely within said handle.

8. The hand tool defined in claim 7 wherein a plurality of annular grooves is successively formed in spaced relation along said shank, at least one of said a lar grooves having disposed therein a rubber ring, said ring being in frictional contact with the wall of said handle.

' 9. The hand tool defined in claim 7 wherein said driving rod extends through the length of said chuck when said striking head of said anvil element is shouldered on the end of said handle and said long end of said chuck is threaded inwardly of said handle, but wherein said driving rod does not extend into said tapered counter-bore in said long end of said chuck when said short end thereofis threaded inwardly of said handle.

10. The hand tool defined in claim 9 wherein said tapered counterbore in said short end of said chuck is adapted to retain an anchoring device in said short end by the frictional contact of the walls thereof with said device and said tapered counterbore in said long end of said chuck is adapted to retain an interchangeable tool element in said long end by the frictional contact of the walls thereof with said tool element.

' 11. A multi-purpose hand tool comprising a hollow handle, a reversible chuck detachably secured to one end of said handle, means disposed on said chuck at one end thereof for the detachable retention of an anchoring device and at the opposite end thereof for the detachable thereon and disposed externally of the other end of the handle, said driving means including means for trans-,

mitting striking force exerted upon the anvil to the anchoring device for driving said device into a wall or similar surface.

12. A multi-purpose hand tool comprising a hollow handle, a driving element telescopically mounted within said handle, said driving element having an anvil disposed externally of one end of the handle and a drive rod disposed internally of the other end of the handle, a chuck detachably secured to said other end of the handle and having an axial bore for containment of the drive rod, means disposed on said chuck for the detachable retention of an anchoring device adjacent the drive rod whereby striking force exerted upon the anvil is transmitted to said anchoring device, and means disposed at the end of said chuck for the detachable retention of a base for said tool.

References Cited in the file of this patent UNITED STATES PATENTS 187,600 Collins Feb. 20, 1877 1,697,414 Cordray Ian. 1, 1929 1,805,005 Phillips May 12, 1931 2,787,178 Maxim Apr. 2, 1957 2,815,692 Daniels Dec. 10, 1957 2,839,754 Pfaff June 24, 1958 2,855,817 Kopf Oct. 14, 1958 2,887,925 Kopf May 26, 1959 FOREIGN PATENTS 90,367 Switzerland Aug. 16, 1921

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Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3119423 *May 10, 1962Jan 28, 1964Hermann Weick HeinzComposite tool structure
US3163865 *Sep 13, 1961Jan 5, 1965Port Clinton Mfg CompanyDrive tool
US3364963 *Oct 27, 1965Jan 23, 1968Gkn Screws Fasteners LtdTool for piercing and threading a workpiece
US3459095 *Sep 28, 1967Aug 5, 1969Omark Industries IncFastening structure
US3990343 *Aug 7, 1975Nov 9, 1976Uniroyal Inc.Rivets for securing end connectors to conveyor belts
US4173828 *Dec 19, 1977Nov 13, 1979Leopold Paul LustigInterchangeable tool operating apparatus with plural motion
US5800109 *May 13, 1997Sep 1, 1998Amifast CorporationFastener with a tapered section and a slot
US5967713 *Sep 17, 1998Oct 19, 1999Emuge-Werk Richard Glimpel Fabrik Fuer Praezisionswerkzeuge Vormals Moschkau & GlimpelQuick-change insert
US7377019 *Jun 28, 2005May 27, 2008Haytayan Harry MMethod and apparatus for fastening together structural components
US8074348Aug 8, 2007Dec 13, 2011Haytayan Harry MApparatus and method for fastening together structural components
US20050235779 *Jun 28, 2005Oct 27, 2005Haytayan Harry MMethod and apparatus for fastening together structural components
US20070271761 *Aug 8, 2007Nov 29, 2007Haytayan Harry MApparatus and method for fastening together structural components
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Classifications
U.S. Classification173/29, 173/104, 408/238, 279/14, 173/131, 173/31
International ClassificationB25C3/00, B25F1/02, B25F1/00
Cooperative ClassificationB25C3/006, B25F1/02
European ClassificationB25C3/00C, B25F1/02
Legal Events
DateCodeEventDescription
Jun 11, 1982ASAssignment
Owner name: U.S.E. DIAMOND, INC.
Free format text: CHANGE OF NAME;ASSIGNOR:U.S. EXPANSION BOLT C.;REEL/FRAME:004011/0509
Effective date: 19801215