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Publication numberUS2991046 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 4, 1961
Filing dateApr 11, 1957
Priority dateApr 16, 1956
Publication numberUS 2991046 A, US 2991046A, US-A-2991046, US2991046 A, US2991046A
InventorsParsons Lional Ashley
Original AssigneeParsons Lional Ashley
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Combined winch and bollard device
US 2991046 A
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Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

July 4, 1961 I L. A. PARSONS 2,991,046

COMBINED WINCH AND BOLLARD DEVICE Filed April 11, 1957 BY \V/W ,d. W

ATTORNEY INVENTOR United States Patent 2,991,046 Patented July 4, 1961 fiice 2,991,046 v r COMBINE-D WINCH AND BOLLARD DEVICE Lional Ashley Parsons, 536 Cameron Road 5., Gate Pa, Tauranga, New Zealand' Filed Apr. 11, 1957, Ser. No. 652,259 Claims priority, application New Zealand Apr. 16, 1956 1 Claim. (Cl. 254-450) This invention relates to bollards and winches and particularly to marine bollards and winches.

The object of the invention is to form a winch and bollard in combination and in doing so to achieve greater simplicity and efliciency in construction and operation.

While it had previously been known to operate a winch and bollard in combination and with a single gearing this has hitherto involved a rather complicated arrangement and has not obviated the use of a separate bollard and winch. According to my invention the combined winch and bollard device may be said to be a single unit in which the whole appliance is constructed on a single axis. This permits greater economy in engineering construction, greater simplicity in operation, and a valuable saving of space. All these factors are of particular importance in launches and similar small vessels but it will also be appreciated that the foregoing advantages may be of importance in larger vessels on wharves and in other marine installations.

The invention comprises broadly a winch and bollard combination constructed of two sections having a common or single axis the bottom section being the bollard and the top section being the winch with a driving shaft passing cent-rally up through the bollard section by which shaft the winch section is adapted to be rotated on top of that bollard section.

A preferred construction of my invention is illustrated in the accompanying drawings in which FIGURE 1 is a half-sectional elevation, and

FIGURE 2 is a plan, and in which drawings A denotes the bollard, A the bollard base, B the winch drum, C the driving shaft, D the deck or other foundation base, E the passage through the bollard, E the bollard relief, F the key between shaft and winch drum, G the recess in the winch drum, H the cap for the recess, H the screw-driver slot, I the grease nipple, I the grease channel from the top of the Winch section to the thrust bearing, L the thrust bearing, M the winch gypsy and N the retaining nut.

In more fully describing my invention with reference to these drawings the appliance is constructed in two main parts or sections, the standing or stationary section A which operates as the bollard, and the top section B which is constructed to rotate and operates as the winch. According to a preferred form of my invention the bollard section may be of the appearance of the conventional form of mooring bollard as shown in the drawings with the shape in elevation of a Maltese cross and symmetrical in all views.

The winch operation is by means of a driving shaft C which passes up through the deck or other foundation D to which the bollard base A is secured loosely through a vertical central pasage in the bollard section B and is keyed by key F into the top rotating section A which operates as the winch drum. The passage B may be of wider diameter at its centre section E so that it forms a bearing top and bottom for the shaft with added clearance relief near its centre. The winch drum top is recessed at G and covered by a cap H. This allows on removal of the cap H for the fastening and removal of the drum B from the shaft C and also for a housing for a grease nipple to grease, through channel I, the thrust bearing L which is machined half into the bottom of the drum B and half into the standing or bollard portion A. To facilitate the operation of the appliance as a winch, the driving power which would normally be an electric motor may be controlled by a conveniently situated foot operated switch.

In operation to haul in on a line or anchor warp fastened to the bollard A, the line or warp would be released from that bollard and two or three turns of line taken on the winch drum B, the loose part of the line pulled in and, by operating the foot switch, the winch drum B is rotated and the line is hauled in as the winch drum revolves. When enough line has been hauled in the line is secured by taking several turns under and over the bollard part A in the usual manner.

When hauling up mooring chains the buoy chain is hauled up on the winch gypsy M until the heavy mooring chain comes up, when the heavy mooring chain can be slipped into a permanent moo'nng hook (not illustrated in the drawings) fastened around the base of the bollard casting A The recess G in the top of the winch section with the associated cover cap H is made so that none of the necessary parts for locking as by nut N or keying by key F the winch section B to the top of the shaft C will extend out into the open above the top winch to catch up any of the lines to be wound around the winch drum. In addition the recess G enables the grease nipple I mounted on the top of shaft at the entry to the grease channel I to also be housed below the top of the winch section. By unscrewing the cap H as for instance by the use of a screw driver inserted into the slot H the recess may be uncovered to permit action on the parts housed in the recess.

It will be appreciated that the foregoing operations can be easily performed by one man whereas with methods now in use the operation can be heavy work for one man and rather complicated by comparison, for example when a heavy mooring chain has to be transferred to a bollard from the winch drum when they are separated even by a short distance.

I desire it to be understood that my invention is not limited to the precise form shown in the drawings. For instance either the winch section or the bollard section or both may be constructed partially hollow and also other means may be used between the two sections than the thrust race L, as, for instance, a Washer.

Having now described my invention what I claim is:

A combined winch and bollard device for hauling in on a line comprising a bollard section having a base and an upstanding body member, a pair of bits each projecting laterally from the upper portion of the body member on opposite sides thereof, and a winch section above the body member, said winch section comprising a winch-driving shaft extending vertically through said body member, and a drum mounted on the upper portion of said body member and on said shaft for rotation about a vertical axis so that a few turns of said line is taken around said drum for hauling thereon as said drum is rotated, the lower portion of said drum juxtaposed with respect to said bits wherein the line as it is hauled moves across said bits and when enough line is hauled in said line is secured by taking a few turns around one of said bits, said drum having a diameter less than the inner ends of said bits.

(References on following page) 3 4 References Cited in the file of this patent FOREIGN PATENTS UNITED STATES PATENTS 20,186 Norway June 6, 1910 15,933 Perley Oct. 21, 1856 1,131,260 France Oct. 15, 1956 1,246,669 Snelling Nov. 13, 1917 1,811,400 McClellan June 23, 1931 5 OTHER REFERENCES 2,288,276 Head "June 30, 1942 A Catalog of Windlasses, published by the American 2,435,447 Kortum Feb. 3, 1948 Engineering Co., Philadelphia, Pa., 1920 (pages 24, 25

2,439,988 Ross Apr. 20, 1948 relied on).

Patent Citations
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Classifications
U.S. Classification254/266, 254/901, 226/190, 114/218
International ClassificationB63B21/16, B66D1/74
Cooperative ClassificationY10S254/901, B66D1/7489, B66D1/7421, B63B2708/00, B63B21/16
European ClassificationB63B21/16, B66D1/74F, B66D1/74P