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Publication numberUS2991574 A
Publication typeGrant
Publication dateJul 11, 1961
Filing dateAug 15, 1960
Priority dateAug 15, 1960
Publication numberUS 2991574 A, US 2991574A, US-A-2991574, US2991574 A, US2991574A
InventorsTrame Charles E
Original AssigneeNeon Products Inc
Export CitationBiBTeX, EndNote, RefMan
External Links: USPTO, USPTO Assignment, Espacenet
Animated display means simulating appearance of effervescing fluid
US 2991574 A
Abstract  available in
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Claims  available in
Description  (OCR text may contain errors)

1 July 11, 1961 C. E. TRA ANIMATED DISPLAY MEANS SIMULATING APPEARANCE OF EFFERVESCING FLUID Filed Aug. 15, 1960 FIG. 2.-

IN VEN TOR.

FIG. 3.

ATTORNEYS.

CHARL 8 E. T R AME.

tates 'This invention relates to animated displays and more particularly to display means simulating the appearance of an efiervescing fluid such as a soft drink, beer, medicinal preparation or the like.

An object of this invention is to provide a display means simulating the appearance of a transparent walled vessel containing eifervescing fluids such as beer, soft drinks, medicinal preparations or the like.

Another object of this invention is to provide for an advertisingdisplay an impervious, inert chamber-enclosing-wall enveloping acup-shaped fluid-filled chamber, a portion of the volume of which contains liquid fluid and the balance of the chamber contains gaseous fluid.

Another object of this invention is to provide a device of the above character having a mat clamped between the spaced wall portions defining the bottom of the cupshaped chamber and which mat is inert to attack by the fluid.

Another object of this invention is to provide a device of the foregoing character in which a vapor-collecting dome is provided in superadjacent relation to the central portion of the mat and which is adapted to receive and accumulate vapor generated by application of heat to the bottom of said chamber wall.

Another object of this invention is to provide a device of the above character which contains a thin layer of fluid so disposed as to give the illusion of a fluid-filled vessel and which upon application of heat to the wall beneath a mat results in vaporization of liquid in the mat and beneath the vapor-collecting dome until suflicient vapor pressure is generated to force vapor bubbles through the interstices of the mat to peripheral areas thereof from which bubbles escape to rise freely through the liquid and escape to the gas filled portion of the chamber where vapor is condensed to return to the fluid-filled portion.

Another object of this invention is to provide a device simulating the apppearance of a beer stein having a central transparent section through which vapor bubbles rising through the liquid may be viewed to create the illusion of beverage content.

- Another object of this invention is to provide a device of the foregoing character in which the lower portion of the stein simulating structure may rotate about a vertical axis to attract attention to the display through motion.

Another object of this invention is to provide an animated display device of the above character in which heat is provided by an electric lamp which also illuminates the bubbles rising through the liquid to provide a sparkling efiect.

Another object of this invention is to provide a device of the above character in which means are provided for regulating air flow in the vicinity of the light bulb to regulate the quantity of heat applied to the chamber to produce vapor at a rate necessary to maintain the desired rate of bubble production.

The above and other objects and features of this in vention will be in part apparent and will in part be obvious to those having ordinary skill in the art to which this invention pertains, from the following description, the accompanying drawings, and the appended claims.

In the drawing, FIG- 1 is a view'in elevation of an animated display ice embodying the instant invention and simulating the appearance of a beverage stein; and

FIG. 2 is a view in vertical section taken generally along the line 22 in FIG. 1, portions of the structure being broken away to more clearly illustrate details of construction; and

FIG. 3 is an enlarged fragmental view in vertical section of a portion of the structure shown in FIG. 2.

In the drawings and following specification, like reference characters indicate like parts.

The embodiment of the invention. illustrated in the drawings simulates the appearance of a beer stein and is suitable for use as an advertising display of substantial dimensions and in which the appearance of an effervescing beverage may be produced through the use of a sealed chamber partly filled with liquid. The embodiment illustrated in the drawings with particular reference to FIG. 2 has a frame 15. The frame 15 comprises a ring portion 16, a mounting bracket portion 17, and sling portion 18. The component portions 16, 17, and 18 of frame 15 may be fabricated or joined in unitary relation by means of welds or the like.

Frame portion 15 is secured to a member 19 which is integrally mounted in fixed relation to a wall or other suitable supporting structure. Member 19 may be an element such as an electrical junction box embedded in a wall. Mounting screws 20 have threaded shanks which extend in cooperating relation to lug191 and through clearance aperture 14 provided in mounting bracket portion 17. Heads 21 of screws 20 clamp the bracket 17 against electrical junction box 19 to secure the bracket 17 and the frame 15 in fixed relation thereto with ring portion 16 disposed in a substantially horizontal attitude. A socket 40 having mounting tab 41 is secured by'nv'et' 42 to frame sling portion 18. An incandescent light bulb 43 is in cooperating relation tosocket 40 and supported in centered subjacent relation to the central aperture 161 provided in frame ring portion 16. The peripheral margin of frame ring portion 16 is turned upwardly to form a rim flange 44 which assists in location and retention of a device supported upon frame ring portion 16 in a predetermined position.

Frame ring portion 16 is adapted to support a generally cup-shaped-chamber-defining transparent envelope 22, which may be of glass or other suitable material having properties of strength and chemical inertness to the substances with which it may be expected to come in contact. The envelope 22 comprises an outer shell portion 23 and an inner shell portion 24. Outer shell portion 23 is of generally cup-shape, having a bottom 25 and an upstanding wall 26 which terminates in rim or edge 27. The inner shell 24 comprises a hollow glass vessel having an upstanding wall 28 which extends upwardly and is joined to neck portion v29 by inwardly turned portion 14. Neck portion 29 extends upwardly to an outwardly flaring mouth portion 30, the peripheral edge of which is turned upwardly to form a lip-like cylindrical rim having an edge 31. The bottom of inner shell 24 comprises a conic ring form portion 32 extending in integral relation from the lower portion of wall 28 to the upper portion of depending lip 281. Depending lip 281 is joined by curve portion 34 to the peripheral portion of vapor-collecting dome 33.

Envelope 22 is assembled by placing mat or pad 35 inside outer shell portion 23 in a position in which it covers the central portion of bottom 25. The pad 3 5 shown in the drawing is a felt-like mat of glass fibers having a density and interfiber spacing of predetermined character which will be subsequently explained. After mat 35 is placed, as shown in FIG. 2, the inner shell 24 is advanced into co-axial relationnto .andwithin cuter she'll portion 23. The thickness and density of pad 35 and the axial dimension of shell 24 are such that the curve portion 34 presents an annular rim or depending portion of a diameter approximately the diameter of bulb 43, a'nnu'larly of vapor-collecting dome 33 so as to compress pad 35 in the manner shown in FIG. 2. It will be noted as shown in FIG. 2, the central portion of mat 35 under vapor-collecting dome 33 is substantially uncompressed and is in spaced relation to the central portion of dome 33 while portion 34 is pressed into mat 35 when the edges 27- and 31 of the respective shell portions 23 and 24 are in adjacent relation suitable for fusing of the rim portions 27, 31 of said shells to join the inner and outer shells into a unitaryenvelope which encloses a cupshaped-shel-l-form chamber 38. As shown in FIG. 2, a filling neck 36 is provided as an integral portion of inner shell portion 24 and the bore 37 extending therethrough, provides communication between the free atmosphere and chamber 38.

A suitable fluid 45 such as a methylene chloride in liquid form is introduced through bore 37 into chamber 38. I have found that the quantity of methylene chloride introduced in the embodiment illustrated in the drawing may occupy a volume of the order of two-thirds of the volume of chamber 38. Thereafter, the remaining volume of chamber 38 is preferably filled substantially with methylene chloride vapor 46 and filler neck 36 is fused shut at 39 to seal envelope 22 and preclude the escape of methylene chloride from chamber 38.

When envelope 22 has been assembled, filled, and sealed, as described, it is adapted for use in display devices simulating the appearance of transparent containers of eifervescing fluids. It is to be noted that the thin shell of fluid 45-disposed between walls 26 and 28 has substantially the same appearance to an observer as would the outer envelope filled with such fluid in the absence of inner shell 24. The fact that the presence of inner shell 24 is not readily apparent in a device such as is shown in FIG. 1, is due in part to the fact that a thin opaque band 47 conceals the gas filled portion of chamber 38 and the envelope 22 defining same by reason of the fact that the lower edge 48 of the opaque band 47 extends below the upper surface 49 of the liquid in chamber 38.

As shown, suitable conductors of electrical energy wires 5051, extend from socket 40 to a source of electricity (not shown), such that incandescent light bulb 43 is illuminated by electrical energy supplied through wire conductors 5051. Such operation of lamp bulb 43 produces light and heat. Since the envelope 22 is transparent, some of the light emitted from bulb 43 passes upwardly through the envelope and illuminates the liquid contained therein.

The heat produced by bulb 43 rises upwardyy and heats the central portion of the bottom 25 of outer shell portion 23. The area heated is primarily the area overlain by mat 35 which tends to restrict fluid flow in the vicinity of the heated portion of bottom 25. When the liquid 45 contained in chamber 38 is methylene chloride, such local application of heat raises the temperature of bottom 25 to the boiling point of methylene chloride, approximately 104 Fahrenheit, and boiling or vaporization of the liquid commences. The flow of liquid methylene chloride into the heating zone is restricted by the mat 35 as Well as the previously formed methylene chloride vapor substantially filling the interfiber spaces in at least the central portion of the mat 35. A portion of such vapor rises into dome 33 displacing any liquid methylene chloride therein. As the vaporization of methylene chloride progresses in the mat 35, vapor will be forced outwardly in a generally radial direction through the interfiber spaces of pad 35 from which the vapor escapes in the form of bubbles 52, 53. These bubbles 52, 53, upon escape from met 35 move upwardly through the liquid methylene chloride .45 and interface .49 .to, the gas-filled portiqn 9f Chamber 38 designated by the reference character 38G. Condensation of methylene chloride vapor occurs in chamber portion 386 and as apparent from FIG. 2, condensate is free to drain into the liquid filled portion of chamber 38 whereby the movement of vapor upwardly through the liquid methylene chloride will eventually be at a rate in equilibrium with the rate of return of condensed methylene chloride from chamber portion 38G. It may also be noted that Where the curve portion 34 is in compressing relation to mat 35, there will be gaps or spaces through which vapor may travel between the fibers of mat 35 and the surface of inner shell portion of envelope 22. The bubbles 52 of vapor which escape through apertures or spaces between the inner shell portion 24 of envelope 22 and mat 3-5 tend to issue as streams of individual bubbles 52 while those bubbles 53 of vapor which escape by passage between the fibers of the mat spaced from the envelope tend to issue in a random fashion as bubbles'53 which do not appear to be released in stream form. The size range of bubbles 52, 53, which escape may be regulated by the density of the mat, that is, the interfiber spacing, and to some extent by the degree of heating applied to the mat-occupied region. The degree of heating affects the quantity or volume of vapor produced and thus the volume and number of vapor bubbles 52, 53 produced to rise upwardly through the liquid 45.

A cup-like shell portion 54 is provided to decoratively house the lower portion of envelope 22, frame portions 16, 18, light bulb 43, and socket 40.

To secure cup-like screen portion 54 in desired relation to the other portion of the device shown, a suitable vertical shaft motor 55, which may be of the synchronous clock type adapted to have an output shaft speed in the range of a few revolutions-per-minute, is mounted upon frame sling portion 18 in which an aperture 181 has been provided to allow downward projection of motor shaft 56. A suitable collar 57 may be secured to motor shaft, 56 by set screw 58. Collar 57 is adapted to cooperate with screen portion 54 so as to couple the latter to motor shaft 56 for rotation in unison therewith. An ornamentai retaining nut 59 in threaded relation to a portion of collar 57 prevents disengagement of screen 54 from collar 57. As shown in FIG. 2, screen 54 may be of a cuplike shape having a rim of slightly larger diameter than the frame ring portion 16 and the lower portion of envelope 22 adjacent thereto. Such dimensioning of screen 54, results in a narrow annular slot 61 through which circulating air may rise. To regulate the rate of air circulation, apertures 62 are provided in the bottom 63 of screen 54. Air may pass through apertures 62 due to heating of air within cup-screen 54 when light bulb 43, as well as motor 55, which are wired in parallel for unison operation, are in operation and produce heat. Since only a portion of the heat produced is utilized in the vaporization of liquid beneath vapor dome 33, the air moving upwardly through apertures 62 serves to carry away excess heat through slot 61 by convection.

Since conditions under which devices of the instant character must operate will vary from place to place, I prefer to provide apertures 62 of substantially maximum possible desired size and then provide regulator 65 having aperture 66 which may be shifted relative to screen bottom 63 to alter the effective area of apertures 62 and thereby effect regulation of the quantity of heat supplied to the bottom 25 of envelope 22 beneath pad 35. The even distribution and/ or dissipation of heat is enhanced by the fact that screen portion 54 is rotated by operation of motor 55.

When the device shown in the drawings is used as an attention-attracting display, advertising material v(not shown) may be placed upon various portions thereof, particularly upon the exterior surface of screen 54 which screen in such case, would preferably be of translucent character, so that light bulb 43 would also serve to backlight such indicia as may appear on screen 54.

As shown in FIGS. tans-2, the upper portions of en velope 22 are concealed by'opaque band 47. Band", which may be ofthin opaque-material applied to theexterior surface of envelope 22, .or may be an integral por-. tion of a cap-like structure 70 formed of any suitable m le terial such as die cast synthetic resins, metals, or the like. Band 47 may simulate the appearance of a collar of beer foam upon the top of the fluid simulating the appearance of effervescing beer contained in and visible through the exposed portions of the transparent walls of envelope 22. The cap portion 70 may have as an integral portion thereof a simulated hinge portion 71 and handle 72. If desired, I have found the portion 47 may be formed to snugly receive and engage the upper portion of envelope 22 and thus serve as mounting means for the portions 70, 71, 72, which, as shown, are in unitary relation thereto.

Having thus described an illustrative embodiment of the invention, it will be apparent to those having ordinary skill in the art to which this invention pertains, that various changes may be made in the embodiment of the invention without departing from either the spirit or scope thereof in view of the appended claims. Therefor, what is claimed as new and desired to be secured by Letters Patent is:

1. In an illuminated advertising display the combination comprising a glass envelope defining a closed fluid chamber, fluid in liquid and gaseous states filling saidchamber, a fibrous mat clamped in fixed relation in the bottom of said chamber between adjacent spaced portions of said glass envelope, said envelope having a domed vapor trapping portion above said mat, a light and heat source subjacent said mat and adapted to vaporize said liquid to supply vapor to said vapor trap from which vapor escapes through the mat as random bubbles and as streams of bubbles within limits of predetermined size range which are illuminated by said light source as they rise through said liquid to the gas filled vapor condensing, portion of said chamber.

2. In an advertising display the combination comprising a glass envelope defining a cup-shaped shell-formclosed fluid chamber, fluid in liquid and gaseous states filling said chamber, a mat clamped in fixed relation in the bottom of said cup-shaped chamber between adjacent spaced portions of said glass envelope, said envelope having a domed vapor trapping portion above said mat, a

. heat source subjacent said mat and adapted to vaporize.

said liquid to supply vapor to said vapor trap from which vapor escapes through the mat as random bubbles within limits of predetermined size range which rise through said liquid to the gas filled vapor condensing portion of said chamber.

3. In an advertising display the combination comprising a glass envelope defining a cup-shaped shell-form closed fluid chamber, fluid in liquid and gaseous states filling said chamber, a fibrous mat clamped in fixed relation in the bottom of said cup-shaped chamber between adjacent spaced portions of said glass envelope, said envelope having a domed vapor trapping portion above said mat, a heat source subjacent said mat and adapted to vaporize said liquid to supply vapor to said vapor trap from which vapor escapes through the mat as random bubbles and as streams of bubbles within limits of predetermined size range which rise through said liquid to the gas filled vapor condensing portion of said chamber.

4. In an illuminated advertising display the combina-.- tion comprising a glass envelope defining a cup-shapedshell form closed fluid chamber, fluid in liquid and gaseous states filling said chamber, a fibrous mat clamped in fixed relation in the bottom of said cup-shaped chamber between adjacent spaced portions of said glass envelope,

to said vapor trap from which vapor escapes through the mat as random vbubbles and as streams of bubbles within limits of predetermined size range which are illuminated by saidlight source-as they'rise through said liquid to the gas filled vapor condensing portion of said chamber.

5. In an illuminated advertising display the combina tion comprising a glass envelope defining a cup-shaped shell-form closed fluid chamber, fiuid in liquid and gaseous states filling said chamber, a fibrous mat having a ring-shaped area clamped in fixed relation in the bottom of said cup-shaped chamber between adjacent spaced portions of said glass envelope, said envelope having a domed vapor trapping portion above a substantially uncompressed portion of said mat, surrounded by a ringshaped portion compressed to greater density having reduced interfiber spacing to restrict fluid flow therethrough, a light and heat source subjacent said mat and adapted to vaporize said liquid to supply vapor to said vapor trap from which vapor escapes through the mat as random bubbles and as streams of bubbles within limits of size range predetermined by interfiber spacing and which bubbles are illuminated by said light source as they rise through said liquid to the gas filled vapor condensing portion of said chamber.

6. In an illuminated advertising display the combination comprising a glass envelope defining a cup-shaped closed fluid chamber, fluid in liquid and gaseous states filling said chamber, a fibrous mat having a ring-shaped area clamped in fixed relation in the bottom of said cupshaped chamber between adjacent spaced portions of said glass envelope, said envelope having a domed vapor trapping portion above a substantially uncompressed portion of said mat surrounded by said ring-shaped portion compressed to greater density with reduced interfiber spacing to restrict fluid flow therethrough, a light and heat source adjacent said mat and adapted to supply heat for vaporizing said liquid, a screen adapted for regulating the flow of heat removing air and the rate of fluid vaporization to control the supply of vapor to said vapor trap from which vapor escapes between fibers of the mat as random bubbles and as streams of bubbles Within limits of predetermined size range which are illuminated by said light source as they rise through said liquid to the gas filled vapor condensing portion of said chamber.

7. An animated advertising display comprising a frame adapted to be secured to a support, a transparent en velope supported upon said frame and defining a thin shell-like cup-form chamber, said chamber being substantially filled with fluid in liquid and gaseous states, an electrically operated light and heat source supported by said frame in subjacent relation to said chamber defining envelope, a cup form shell supported by said motor and rotatable thereby, said shell receiving said light, motor and substantial portions of said frame and having a rim in close spaced relation to said chamber defining envelope, there being apertures in the bottom of said cup, means for obstructing portions of said apertures, and means in said envelope defined chamber for controlling fluid movement adjacent the area of said envelope to which heat is applied, said motor rotating said shell to permit substantially even flow of air upwardly therethrough at a predetermined rate to efiect even removal of excess heat from adjacent said envelope bottom whereby the appearance of a vessel containing an effervescent fluid may be simulated.

8. A device according to claim 7 characterized by the fact that the upper portion of said envelope is encased by said envelope having a domed vapor trapping portion an opaque band concealing the gaseous fluid containing 7 portion of said envelope defined chamber whereby a foam 2,i5,Q53 collared efierverscing beverage may be simulated. 2,378,934

e 2583,941' References Clted 1n the file of th1s patent 2520691 I UNITED STATES PATENTS Y Y 5 2573574111 Re. 22,289 Otis Mar. 16, 1943

Patent Citations
Cited PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US2353063 *Nov 6, 1941Jul 4, 1944Carl W OtisOrnamental illuminating device
US2378934 *Aug 5, 1943Jun 26, 1945Joseph H KlonerIlluminated bubbling ornament
US2383941 *Jan 28, 1942Sep 4, 1945Carl W OtisOrnamental illuminating device
US2520691 *May 30, 1945Aug 29, 1950Carl W OtisOrnamental bubbling light
US2731747 *Jul 19, 1951Jan 24, 1956R R Kellogg Advertising ServicReflector display device
USRE22289 *Nov 27, 1935Mar 16, 1943 Display
Referenced by
Citing PatentFiling datePublication dateApplicantTitle
US3392466 *Oct 24, 1965Jul 16, 1968Joseph C. Lo GiudiceEffervescent advertising display and method of making same
US3499238 *Jun 9, 1967Mar 10, 1970Sidney PublickerBubbling display device
US4928412 *Feb 24, 1988May 29, 1990Nishiyama Gary SDecorative cup
US5291674 *Feb 25, 1993Mar 8, 1994Mechtronics CorporationRecirculating snowfall-type display
US6065640 *Apr 18, 1997May 23, 2000Ho; StanleyDispenser
US6105819 *Jun 17, 1999Aug 22, 2000Allure Home Creation Co., Inc.Container with a structural improvement
US6138870 *May 7, 1999Oct 31, 2000Lin; RichTwo-chamber milky lotion bottle
US6193106 *Sep 28, 1999Feb 27, 2001Allure Home Creation Co., Inc.Dispenser
US7927171Sep 19, 2007Apr 19, 2011Mattel, Inc.Infant entertainment device
EP0512180A1 *May 7, 1991Nov 11, 1992GREAT TRUTH CO., LtdReceptacle for containing things and providing amusing effects
WO1990011589A1 *Mar 21, 1989Oct 4, 1990Gary S NishiyamaDecorative cup
WO1998047810A1 *Nov 24, 1997Oct 29, 1998Allure Home Creation Co IncDispenser
WO1999066480A1 *Jun 10, 1999Nov 28, 1999Allure Home Creation Co IncA container with a structural improvement
WO2000068648A2 *Apr 28, 2000Nov 16, 2000Seaquist ClosuresA valved dispensing system with priming liquid loss prevention
Classifications
U.S. Classification40/406
International ClassificationG09F13/24, A47G23/00, A47G23/06, A47G19/22, G09F13/00, G09F19/12, A63H33/30
Cooperative ClassificationA47G19/2227, A47G2023/0658, A63H33/3022, G09F13/24, G09F19/12
European ClassificationA47G19/22B6, A63H33/30E, G09F19/12, G09F13/24